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Bandsaw tuning for resawing

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Forum topic by leftcoaster posted 09-10-2021 05:05 AM 487 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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leftcoaster

434 posts in 2126 days


09-10-2021 05:05 AM

I’d like to get better RESAW cut quality on my Laguna 14bx with the resaw king blade.

Adding blade tension helped a bunch already. However I still see two problems -

One – while the kerf along the length of the board is straight (no drift) there can be significant differences in thickness from the top of the board to the bottom – as much as 1/16” on a 7” board.

I’m not expecting a glassy finish but it seems rougher than it should be. This blade has not seen so much action that I expect it to be dull. I’m feeding quite slowly – sometimes the saw wants to go faster.

Where to start?


17 replies so far

View rizzo's profile

rizzo

84 posts in 2501 days


#1 posted 09-10-2021 11:24 AM

A couple quick things to check, which you may have already done. You say you have adjusted your fence for no drift, have you checked that the blade is truly dead square to the table? A digital gauge like a wixey can be really helpful to check this there are other ways though too. Just make sure you are checking at least halfway up the blade or higher. The higher you can go the more accurate it will be to giving you an indication of if it is 90 degrees or not.

Second, where is the blade on the wheel? Is “it” centered or do you have the deepest part of the gullet centered. Setting the deepest part of the gullet centered on the wheel is the way to go, as the teeth are not well supported with larger blades when the whole blade is centered on the wheel.

Third is making sure the thrust bearing (in your case the rear ceramic) is just barely making contact with the blade while it is off, so when the blade is then under load while running as you push wood through it, that it has support behind it.

Certainly not a list of all the things you could / should check, but a few things that helped me get my laguna set up for re-sawing.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8004 posts in 2637 days


#2 posted 09-10-2021 12:00 PM

+1 on centering the gullet on wheel and not the blade. You want the most tension applied where the blade is doing the work. When I started doing that my saw started working much better. The thrust bearing should only contact the back of the blade while cutting.

The type of blade you are using will make all the difference too. For example, the Highland Woodworking Wood Slicer blade yields an exceptionally smooth cut when resawing compared to most typical bandsaw blades. They dull a little faster but the quality of the cut is probably only second to a carbide blade. Timberwolf just released a new blade for resawing and veneer that I just bought but haven’t tried yet that might also be worth a look. If you are hearing any regular tapping or other sounds, those can contribute to rougher cuts as well. Check for a rough weld, clean the blade and the tires to see if you can make it run more quietly.

If you have verified that table is square to the blade and still getting a sloped cut, a dull or dirty blade is usually the first suspect for me , though for me I usually get a domed cut not a sloped one. If you look at the bottom guides during the cut, can you see if the blade is hard against one of the guide bearings? Which way does it slope, left or right? Using the wrong type of blade with too many teeth per inch could also contribute to the problem. If the gullets are too small, deep cuts like when resawing cannot clear the sawdust efficiently and the quality of the cut suffers and you can also get sloped or domed cuts because of it. 3-4 TPI is the maximum I would use.

And as always get recommended, if you haven’t already, watch the Snodgrass bandsaw clinic video on YouTube. It has some good tips on proper bandsaw setup and is where most of us learned about setting the gullet up with the middle of the wheel.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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HokieKen

19438 posts in 2388 days


#3 posted 09-10-2021 12:01 PM

It does sound like you have an issue with the blade and table being square so I’d check that like rizzo suggests. I’m not sure what kind of fence you’re using but you’ll also want to check to be sure it’s square to the table.

As far as the rough cut, you could just have one tooth that is bent out. Might want to try stoning the sides of the blade to make sure all teeth have even set.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View dbw's profile

dbw

631 posts in 2886 days


#4 posted 09-10-2021 12:18 PM

+1 on the suggestions. Checking the basics is where I’d start. KIS (keep it simple).

-- Woodworking is like a vicious cycle. The more tools you buy the more you find to buy.

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

434 posts in 2126 days


#5 posted 09-10-2021 01:23 PM

This is great advice! One question about this:

“ you look at the bottom guides during the cut, can you see if the blade is hard against one of the guide bearings? ”

What’s the fix for being hard against a bearing ? Does the rest of the advice here even that out or is there a bearing adjustment issue as well? I have the ceramic guides and they are set to just touch the sides of the blade behind the gullet.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4080 posts in 3047 days


#6 posted 09-10-2021 01:34 PM

Try setting the rear bearings or ceramic so the when you add pressure to the front of the blade it touches both equally.
There’s several ways to this you can figure it out for sure.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View trsnider's profile

trsnider

285 posts in 3259 days


#7 posted 09-10-2021 01:39 PM

Look at one of Alex Snodgrass videos on youtube. https://youtu.be/XYYG91fr_2w
He’s with Carter Guides but the videos are an excellent resource on bandsaw tuneups and usage. He sort of pushes Carter Guides but not in an overtly obnixious way. There are several videos posted.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8004 posts in 2637 days


#8 posted 09-10-2021 02:17 PM


This is great advice! One question about this:

“ you look at the bottom guides during the cut, can you see if the blade is hard against one of the guide bearings? ”

What’s the fix for being hard against a bearing ? Does the rest of the advice here even that out or is there a bearing adjustment issue as well? I have the ceramic guides and they are set to just touch the sides of the blade behind the gullet.

- leftcoaster

If the blade is hard against a bearing, a dull blade or really dirty blade is almost always the culprit in my experience. I usually try cleaning the blade by soaking it in Simple green first which quickly softens any build up so you can just wipe it off and if it continues after that, I change/replace the blade. If it is not hard against the bearing, it is probably some sort of setup issue with the saw itself or possibly some sort of user error like trying to push too hard with a not sharp but not yet completely dull blade or the wrong type of blade for the cut.

EDIT: The reason I asked if it was left or right is that for me, dull blades almost always deflect right (facing the front of the blade), probably because I cut a lot of round bowl blanks using a jig which I assume causes the teeth on one side to dull more quickly than the other.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5891 posts in 2472 days


#9 posted 09-10-2021 03:42 PM

Given what you said, first thing to check is if the blade is parallel to the fence face. This is where all the alignments for resawing occur. Since you mention that the cut is straight (no drift), it seems your fence is not parallel to the blade.

Of course having the blade 90 degrees to the table and the fence 90 deg. to the table is a requirement for general sawing, but often the fence can be a tad tilted after moving it and should be checked carefully before doing a resaw.

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

434 posts in 2126 days


#10 posted 09-10-2021 07:04 PM

Well that Snodgrass video is extremely helpful. The simple act of taking off the table was revelatory and getting the gullet to the middle of the blade makes sense as well. With the table off, I was able to see that the lower guides were doing me no favors at all. They were sort of skewed in ways that would explain my troubles to a large degree. Going through the tune up in general was helpful. Some things that squeaked no longer squeak, etc.

So you can imagine my apprehension at the first cut following this effort. And boy did it pay off. Check out this 8.5” piece of 6/4 hard maple that I split down the middle. The cut quality is hugely better despite the blade missing two teeth (I will replace). The dimensions are dead on. No drift. No slope. Much less effort needed to feed the stock too – the saw just gobbles it up.

Thanks all!!

Edited to add: I followed the manufacturer’s instructions about guide distance from the blade. These are ceramic rather than ball bearings and so some of Snodgrass’ directions didn’t translate exactly.

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HokieKen

19438 posts in 2388 days


#11 posted 09-10-2021 08:23 PM

Well done :-) I wouldn’t necessarily throw a blade away because of two missing teeth. There are lots of teeth on there. It’s unlikely to notice a couple that are missing.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8004 posts in 2637 days


#12 posted 09-10-2021 09:12 PM

It is always nice when things work out.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2292 posts in 2898 days


#13 posted 09-10-2021 09:23 PM

Following this as my C-14 cuts fine, but rougher than I think it should. Roller guides of course. Set them a tad tighter, upped the tension just a bit and it is better, but not what I have seem from others saws.
Blades are from sawblades.com, which many have recommended.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8004 posts in 2637 days


#14 posted 09-10-2021 09:32 PM

What kind of tooth set does your blades have? One reason that the Highland woodslicer resaws so nicely is it has a very narrow set and kerf.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

2040 posts in 3566 days


#15 posted 09-11-2021 12:35 AM

Sounds like the OP resolved most, if not all the problems.

For anyone else that has similar issues and hasn’t figured them out, here are two more things to look at. The blade guides (talking about block guides here) need to be square to the blade and as close as possible without pinching. With the guides that close, the blade weld must be clean and flat otherwise something will get messed up when the weld goes through the guides.

I finally got around to replacing the Euro guides on the Grizzly 513 using hardened 5/8” punch pins. Using PSA sandpaper stuck to the sides of the bandsaw blade, I sanded the pins to a perfect fit with the blade (bandsaw unplugged and moving the wheel by hand).

They are mounted so close it looks like they’re rubbing but the blade glides through smoothly and the flutter caused by out-of-square Euro guides is gone.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

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