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Forum topic by MikeyMikeC posted 09-09-2021 12:28 AM 487 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeyMikeC

3 posts in 608 days


09-09-2021 12:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple oak milling joining

I plan on starting a bed build out of either hard maple or white oak. The design is going to be inspired by this bed which as you can see has some 2.75” square rails and posts. I’m trying to plan out what my options are for making these thick rails and posts. Presumably Option 1 would be to source 12/4 lumber which would put me at around 3” thickness. Assuming the boards are 6+ inches wide I could maybe get 2 rails out of a single board after jointing and planing them. Ripping the board would be a challenge with my contractor saw, but once that is done I do have 6” jointer and 15” planer to get them to final dimension. I think another downside is I may end up with quite a bit of waste with this size lumber if I end up with a less then 3” strip left over.

Another option I was thinking of was using 6/4 and ripping it to 1.5” x 3” wide boards which I can then joint, laminate together, and plane and joint again to get my final 2.75”x2.75” rail. Any other things I should be considering? Any advise is appreciated as this will be my first time using anything thicker then 4/4 for a project.


14 replies so far

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SMP

4831 posts in 1149 days


#1 posted 09-09-2021 12:35 AM

I would check prices on lumber where you are and size availability. I find by me, 5/4, 6/4, and 8/4 are similar price per BF, but 12/4 is way more. So I will usually just laminate 6/4 or 8/4 and use that, whatever is close enough to finished size without stressing on if I make a mistake. That said I tend to just use 8/4, but in your case I would use 6/4 if they are nice straight pieces.

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Madmark2

3096 posts in 1831 days


#2 posted 09-09-2021 01:28 AM

6/4 isn’t going to yield 1-1/2” thickness. On a good day you’ll only get 1-1/4”. Doubling is only 2-1/2”. Use 2x (two by) pieces. Each should be 1-1/2” S2S or doubled is 3” with enough to plane smooth.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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CWWoodworking

2207 posts in 1422 days


#3 posted 09-09-2021 01:43 AM

Whats the rest of the bed made out of? I would probably use thinner material and glue it up depending on design.

My dining table has 5.25” legs. 3 layers of 8/4. turned out pretty good.

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MikeyMikeC

3 posts in 608 days


#4 posted 09-09-2021 02:22 AM



6/4 isn t going to yield 1-1/2” thickness. On a good day you ll only get 1-1/4”. Doubling is only 2-1/2”. Use 2x (two by) pieces. Each should be 1-1/2” S2S or doubled is 3” with enough to plane smooth.

- Madmark2

Yeah not sure what I was thinking, looks like 8/4 is going to be the way to go…

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CWWoodworking

2207 posts in 1422 days


#5 posted 09-09-2021 03:02 AM


6/4 isn t going to yield 1-1/2” thickness. On a good day you ll only get 1-1/4”. Doubling is only 2-1/2”. Use 2x (two by) pieces. Each should be 1-1/2” S2S or doubled is 3” with enough to plane smooth.

- Madmark2

Yeah not sure what I was thinking, looks like 8/4 is going to be the way to go…

- MikeyMikeC

You might get there. There have been times when I got that much out of 6/4. If its readily available and useful in other parts of the bed, id take a chance on it.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2158 posts in 970 days


#6 posted 09-09-2021 03:20 AM

Food for thought.

I would only figure solid wood for the end posts.
The rest of the rails can be made 45’n 2 pieces together, and filling the inside with a plywood core, like so.

PS: You could also use hardwood in place of the plywood if you want it more solid.

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SMP

4831 posts in 1149 days


#7 posted 09-09-2021 03:30 AM


You might get there. There have been times when I got that much out of 6/4. If its readily available and useful in other parts of the bed, id take a chance on it.

- CWWoodworking

Same. if you get decent straight boards it shouldn’t be a problem. especially if you are using hand planes. Sure, mindlessly running them through a thickness planer multiple passes will usually needlessly waste more than necessary.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

237 posts in 628 days


#8 posted 09-09-2021 05:15 AM

+1 for LeeRoy’s food for thought.

If you laminate two 6/4 pieces and only manage to get 2 5/8, would it still give you the look your after. Then just alter the other lengths to get your final platform.
My other concern would be supporting the 7’ lengths on the bed of the 6” jointer

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Madmark2

3096 posts in 1831 days


#9 posted 09-09-2021 05:29 AM

Jeff:
+-1/8” to 1/4” or so should be in tolerance for bed frame. Double check existing but most times frame vs mattress dims aren’t that tight.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View MikeyMikeC's profile

MikeyMikeC

3 posts in 608 days


#10 posted 09-09-2021 11:07 AM



Food for thought.

I would only figure solid wood for the end posts.
The rest of the rails can be made 45 n 2 pieces together, and filling the inside with a plywood core, like so.

PS: You could also use hardwood in place of the plywood if you want it more solid.

- LeeRoyMan

Yes this is also a great suggestion. I had in my mind I needed the rail to be solid for rigidness but the rail is supported by the storage box below it as well so maybe this plywood/hardwood sandwich option doable.. thanks!

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

476 posts in 2775 days


#11 posted 09-09-2021 12:14 PM

You could also make a mitered sleeve and add a core in key strength areas. You will only need 4/4 to start with and the posts will be cheaper and easier to make with a contractor saw.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2207 posts in 1422 days


#12 posted 09-09-2021 04:20 PM


You could also make a mitered sleeve and add a core in key strength areas. You will only need 4/4 to start with and the posts will be cheaper and easier to make with a contractor saw.

- TechTeacher04

A sleeve with a core wouldn’t really work well in this instance. The leg has an exposed top and a taper to it.

Just glueing two pieces of wood together is about as easy as you get. And it’s definitely not cheaper to do sleeve in this instance.

View gdaveg's profile

gdaveg

363 posts in 445 days


#13 posted 09-09-2021 05:22 PM

For the TV Table legs for my last project I wanted around 2 inches square. The supplier had boards 13/16” thick. I laminated 3 pieces 2.375” wide to make 2.44” x 2.38”. Cut down to 2.25” square. After sanding are just over 2” square.

The pieces all came out of the same board so grain and color looked good together. I picked pieces that the grain was a close match for each leg. Cheap way to get QS wood, ha!!

I did not want to go with 12/4 due to cost of a 10 foot board. this Lumber store makes you leave them minimum of 6 feet out of typically 10 footers.

So a long way of saying I would laminate 4 layers of 4/4 if you want 2.75” square.

-- Dave, Vancouver, WA & Tucson, AZ

View DS's profile

DS

3953 posts in 3664 days


#14 posted 09-09-2021 05:44 PM

For these types of glue ups, I prefer working with 8/4 lumber.
It is usually readily available, somewhat moisture stable and you can reliably net 1 3/4” thickness from it,

Start by planing the rough board to 1 3/4” thickness.
Rip it to 3” wide strips.

Then, to get your final sizing, just glue up a 3” thick butcher block style plank to the width of your thickness planer.(or less, depending on how much you need — my planer can handle 12 1/2” fine)

Then, after surfacing it to your 2 3/4 net thickness, rip it to get your 2 3/4” wide x 2 3/4” thick boards.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS

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