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"Tiger Grain" White Oak

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Forum topic by TxSurveyor posted 09-08-2021 05:47 PM 388 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TxSurveyor

63 posts in 112 days


09-08-2021 05:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tiger grain white oak grain

Had never heard of this before. Beautiful! Wonder what causes it. Any other non-typical / unique grain patterns in American hard/softwoods y’all are aware?

-- Will, TX -- "You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas" - Davy Crockett


9 replies so far

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splintergroup

5761 posts in 2442 days


#1 posted 09-08-2021 05:54 PM

I believe it is just happenstance. The medullary rays which make the quarter sawn boards visually unique tend to twist and bend as the angle of the grain varies slightly from 90 degrees.
Basically every tree has this, but the cut has to be just right for it to be exposed.

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therealSteveN

8681 posts in 1794 days


#2 posted 09-08-2021 07:06 PM

Many woods face different positioning on hills, exposure to light, and an unknown number of other factors as they grow. I’ve read where some thought the soil, or base where the tree grew could also change dynamics of the wood. Know there are a lot of different “variances” out there, and many which are quite the same, but known by different names in different regions of the world.

This probably isn’t a complete list, but many are talked about here. Figure and Grain is an interesting page at Hobbit House.

What Bruce says about the cut is 100%. A lot of times a log is magical, if the Sawyer just turns it this way to cut, instead of just lopping it off.

Unfortunately that day I didn’t have a cell phone with me, and probably would never have thought of using it to take a pic, but I was at Frank Miller lumber, and out near shipping they had 2 skids of lumber. It was white oak, and had a curl as crazy as any fiddleback Maple I had ever seen. Each board was 30+” wide, and all was cut 6/4 thick, and they were somewhere around 30’ long. Destination was Fender guitar. I just stood with my mouth open. I looked over at Rob, and he had his gaping open too.

Darryl, then head of the retail store came over, and he said he’d stood looking at it for a while too. He said the sawyer spotted the figure by looking at the bark, so they didn’t waste any, and just started to cut it for figure, evidently knowing what it was going to look like. Otherwise it may have looked like some plain old White Oak, and that would have been a shame.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Lazyman

7836 posts in 2608 days


#3 posted 09-08-2021 08:21 PM



I believe it is just happenstance. The medullary rays which make the quarter sawn boards visually unique tend to twist and bend as the angle of the grain varies slightly from 90 degrees.
Basically every tree has this, but the cut has to be just right for it to be exposed.

- splintergroup

+1. If you look at the end grain of oaks like the image below from wood-database.com, you can actually see the rays radiating out from the center. When the cut results in those rays being nearly parallel to the surface you get some really cool grain affects. The thickness and length of the rays has an impact too. Most trees have rays like this but they are too thin or may not radiate out as far so aren’t that visible even when quarter sawn.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SMP

4755 posts in 1126 days


#4 posted 09-08-2021 08:35 PM

yep, just a pattern of QSWO. Of course someone will give it a trendy name and charge more for it like they do with diets etc. My daughter picked out this orientation when i made her a desk out of QSWO from the woodpile.

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JCamp

1413 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 09-08-2021 09:03 PM

No clue what causes it but like others have said it’s just seems to come out in quarter dawn white oak. I have some outs that I got from a saw mill that have that in them and they are on my chicken coop as siding. I even got a pallet that has some in it. It is pretty tho.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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Kelly

3759 posts in 4164 days


#6 posted 09-09-2021 04:15 AM

Some say even strong winds can cause changes in the wood grain.

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TxSurveyor

63 posts in 112 days


#7 posted 09-09-2021 04:05 PM



Some say even strong winds can cause changes in the wood grain.

- Kelly


I believe it!

-- Will, TX -- "You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas" - Davy Crockett

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TxSurveyor

63 posts in 112 days


#8 posted 09-09-2021 04:16 PM



...

Unfortunately that day I didn t have a cell phone with me, and probably would never have thought of using it to take a pic, but I was at Frank Miller lumber, and out near shipping they had 2 skids of lumber. It was white oak, and had a curl as crazy as any fiddleback Maple I had ever seen. Each board was 30+” wide, and all was cut 6/4 thick, and they were somewhere around 30 long. Destination was Fender guitar. I just stood with my mouth open. I looked over at Rob, and he had his gaping open too.

...

- therealSteveN

That’s fantastic. As a guitar player I find that very cool! Unusual though for guitars, I wonder what they were using the WO for.

-- Will, TX -- "You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas" - Davy Crockett

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Foghorn

1275 posts in 607 days


#9 posted 09-13-2021 04:37 PM


That s fantastic. As a guitar player I find that very cool! Unusual though for guitars, I wonder what they were using the WO for.

- TxSurveyor


WO is getting more popular for acoustics and electrics as exotic species become more difficult to obtain in sufficient quantity and quality and of course prices are ever increasing.

-- Darrel

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