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Glue Myths and End Grain glue ups

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Forum topic by Foghorn posted 09-07-2021 06:14 PM 616 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Foghorn

1301 posts in 635 days


09-07-2021 06:14 PM

A pretty interesting video explaining how end grain joints are stronger than edge grain joints. Who would have thunk?

https://youtu.be/m7HxBa9WVis

-- Darrel


8 replies so far

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SMP

4849 posts in 1154 days


#1 posted 09-07-2021 11:01 PM

kind of fascinating to watch TBH. I think some of the reasons end glue joints get a bad rap are:

1: Crappy crosscuts in the past with circular saw or 40t multipurpose blades in contractor saws.
2. Older glues that weren’t as good as Titebond(1980s or 90s elmers wood glue)

Because in the past i have glued end grain joints that failed(like 30 odd years ago)

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

17536 posts in 3867 days


#2 posted 09-07-2021 11:27 PM

Very good!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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SMP

4849 posts in 1154 days


#3 posted 09-08-2021 12:48 AM

Forgot to mention, i think one of the key things in his video was that all his pieces were precisely square in every direction.

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shipwright

8753 posts in 4047 days


#4 posted 09-08-2021 02:02 PM

Good party trick!
In the real world we all know that wood breaks more easily along the grain than across which is why we have table trestles, cabinet ends, and shelf dados to support that orientation. In these cases we know that pretty much all glues are stronger than the wood and the wood will fail if not properly supported.

In end joints we know that no glue is as strong as the wood which is why we use scarff joints to help achieve a glue joint that won’t fail before the wood does.

What is a little surprising I guess is that the end grain joints are as strong as they are but it really is irrelevant in the context of real world use.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Kelly

3805 posts in 4193 days


#5 posted 09-09-2021 04:23 AM

I have end grain picture frames that are 40 years old holding 1/4” thick mirror weighing in around 20 pounds and no signs of having given up.

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Rich

7470 posts in 1838 days


#6 posted 09-09-2021 04:24 AM


I have end grain picture frames that are 40 years old holding 1/4” thick mirror weighing in around 20 pounds and no signs of having given up.

- Kelly

Mitered?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Kelly

3805 posts in 4193 days


#7 posted 09-09-2021 04:53 AM

Some are. Others are 1/4 circles for the 90 degree corners. That’s actually the biggest one. Sadly, I don’t have photos. I do of the mitered ones (a 1/2” thick mirror about 20” x 20”).

This mitered one was just 2x fir.

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therealSteveN

8911 posts in 1823 days


#8 posted 09-09-2021 01:54 PM

Interesting. Maybe the most important thing you saw was the attention to crisp, square, cuts to start with, and the attention to detail he used in his glue up. No matter what you are gluing up, or it’s orientation the glue up will benefit from good approximation of the parts, and ample glue.

-- Think safe, be safe

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