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10" table saw blade - rip and crosscut hardwoods

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Forum topic by toolie posted 09-05-2021 09:24 PM 750 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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toolie

2210 posts in 3911 days


09-05-2021 09:24 PM

Hi. I’m doing more end grain hardwood cutting boards these days. What have individuals going similar work with hardwoods found to work well for ripping the stock to width and then crosscutting the initial (edge grain) cutting board glue up for the end grain “up” glue up?

Thanks.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.


17 replies so far

View SMP's profile

SMP

4952 posts in 1188 days


#1 posted 09-05-2021 10:08 PM

I have an Amana combination blade that works well. But I am sure you will soon get 100 more recommendations lol!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6773 posts in 3592 days


#2 posted 09-05-2021 10:21 PM

I assume you want a blade designed for thick stock since you are doing cutting boards. Keep that in mind when choosing a blade.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5021 posts in 2777 days


#3 posted 09-05-2021 11:23 PM

Asking about table saw blade selection is like asking which super model looks better. lol
Lots of different answers, and most are correct within certain bounds.

Here is general guide:
Tips for Picking Saw Blades

TS HP can narrow blade choices. I find full thickness blades defect less, especially when ripping less than perfect wood. But you need a min 2HP saw to use them.

Have used all kinds of general purpose blades and none work perfect for both rip and cross cut on thick stock. The Tenryu Gold Medal has been best GP blade I’ve used (among magazine editor recommended blades by Tenryu/Freud/Forest/Amana). Cross cuts are good, and it doesn’t burn cherry/maple like a 50-60T combo blade when ripping.

As AlaskaGuy mentioned, ripping thick lumber needs different blade. I flip-flop between a Tenryu Industrial 24T (IW-25524CBD1) or Freud Industrial 24T Rip Blade (LM72M010) for serious rip cutting. If ripping large stacks of 12/4, might want a 18T rip blade.

Best Luck finding YOUR favorite super model!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View SMP's profile

SMP

4952 posts in 1188 days


#4 posted 09-06-2021 12:18 AM



Asking about table saw blade selection is like asking which super model looks better. lol
Lots of different answers, and most are correct within certain bounds.

Here is general guide:
Tips for Picking Saw Blades

TS HP can narrow blade choices. I find full thickness blades defect less, especially when ripping less than perfect wood. But you need a min 2HP saw to use them.

Have used all kinds of general purpose blades and none work perfect for both rip and cross cut on thick stock. The Tenryu Gold Medal has been best GP blade I ve used (among magazine editor recommended blades by Tenryu/Freud/Forest/Amana). Cross cuts are good, and it doesn t burn cherry/maple like a 50-60T combo blade when ripping.

As AlaskaGuy mentioned, ripping thick lumber needs different blade. I flip-flop between a Tenryu Industrial 24T (IW-25524CBD1) or Freud Industrial 24T Rip Blade (LM72M010) for serious rip cutting. If ripping large stacks of 12/4, might want a 18T rip blade.

Best Luck finding YOUR favorite super model!

- CaptainKlutz

Megan Fox is QUITE different than a TS blade!

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2247 posts in 1010 days


#5 posted 09-06-2021 12:32 AM

If you can handle a wider kerfed blade I think this would be a good one for your purpose.

A few extra teeth for cross cutting, yet aggressive enough to rip with.

View Rich's profile

Rich

7559 posts in 1872 days


#6 posted 09-06-2021 01:10 AM


If you can handle a wider kerfed blade I think this would be a good one for your purpose. A few extra teeth for cross cutting, yet aggressive enough to rip with.

- LeeRoyMan

That’s a glue line rip blade with triple chip grind teeth. They’re designed to give extremely smooth rip cuts that can skip the jointer and go right to glue up.

They’re set up differently when you cut with them, with only a small fraction of the tooth above the surface being cut.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3153 posts in 1871 days


#7 posted 09-06-2021 02:44 AM

My fave combo is the Freud LU83. It gives glassy crosscuts and glue line rips from a $60 blade.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View toolie's profile

toolie

2210 posts in 3911 days


#8 posted 09-06-2021 11:15 AM

Many thanks tor all the good comments above regarding a one blade does it all solution. I, unfortunately, did what I was afraid I‘d do. I didn’t word the question properly. I’m not looking for a one blade does it all solution on this project. I am asking for a cross cut blade recommendation and another blade recommendation for ripping hardwoods with 8/4 being pretty much my maximum material thickness.

I’ve read the article CK linked but was concerned about the article’s age when recommending individual brands and models of blades currently available. So if anyone has any CCing blade recommendations for CCing hardwoods and any recommendations for a different blade for ripping hardwoods ( again, with 8/4 being the max thickness) based on personal first hand experience, I would be most appreciative. Thanks in advance.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Rich's profile

Rich

7559 posts in 1872 days


#9 posted 09-06-2021 01:29 PM


I am asking for a cross cut blade recommendation and another blade recommendation for ripping hardwoods with 8/4 being pretty much my maximum material thickness.

- toolie

Well, what do you know? LeeRoy was a mind reader on this one. His glue line rip blade would make an excellent choice for a rip blade. For crosscut, I like to use a dedicated crosscut blade, and any of the top brands will give outstanding results.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2299 posts in 2932 days


#10 posted 09-06-2021 02:20 PM

I found I was not happy with combo blades. I use a CMT rip and Amana 60 tooth crosscut.
Especially true on a contractor grade saw. A 3 HP can power through better, but thr right blade for the job is still the best choice. I have heard of Tenryu but never had one. I bought the CMT for flat bottom as well as general rip.

I have been much happier with Amana and CMT over Freud.

In a production chop where you can’t take the time to change a blade, then have two saws. Cheaper. For the rest of us, spend the time.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2210 posts in 3911 days


#11 posted 09-06-2021 02:50 PM

To add even more details, I am a hobbyist with two 113 C-man/Ridgid contractor saws. No 3 hp saws here (sold the right tilt unisaw to keep the two contractor saws). Any specific model numbers providing good rip cuts for the rip blade and model numbers providing good hardwood crosscuts would be appreciated.

And just because I don’t want to have to fuss with my splitter, if recommendations cold be kept to 1/8” kerf blades, it would be appreciated. Thanks.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9097 posts in 3860 days


#12 posted 09-06-2021 03:01 PM

View Ed Weber's profile

Ed Weber

82 posts in 165 days


#13 posted 09-06-2021 04:59 PM

I use Freud blades which have been discussed.
If I need to rip a large quantity of hardwood, I use the bandsaw, mill to size, then crosscut.
JMO

View xedos's profile

xedos

452 posts in 583 days


#14 posted 09-06-2021 09:39 PM



if I need to rip a large quantity of hardwood, I use the bandsaw, mill to size, then crosscut.
JMO
- Ed Weber

carbon steel, HSS, or carbide ?

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1860 posts in 3870 days


#15 posted 09-07-2021 04:10 AM

I use whatever I have in my saw at the time. Generally it’s a combination blade. My drum sander takes care of any tear out.

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