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Turning The Inside Of A Salad Bowl

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Forum topic by adot45 posted 09-03-2021 12:47 PM 528 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


09-03-2021 12:47 PM

I’m a beginning segment turner and am using Don Jovag’s book. Some things are very clear and some things he has lost me, I suppose they’ll make more sense to me as I gain a little more experience. I’ve made the bowl using his steps so far and now I am working on the bottom/inside. I’m not crazy about sticking a tool in there! Please take a look at thiese pictures and tell me if I am on the right track as far as working on the inside.


The butt of my tool hits the wall so the angle is not super stable or should I be using different tool(s)?
This part seems awfully risky to me. I’m getting a lot of catches too. Pull the lathe away from the wall?
Thanks

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.


28 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

1800 posts in 2968 days


#1 posted 09-03-2021 01:25 PM

I could be wrong, but from what I can see, it looks like you’re pretty low with the tool rest. That would present another problem that can be resolved by raising your tool rest.

The issue you’re asking about is only operator error. You do not need to present your tool in that angle. All you need to do is to swing the handle towards the tool rest and away form the rim of your piece. You can now oro0ceed to finish turning your piece.

Don Jovag is a member of my turning club in Tucson. He does beautiful stuff. ....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#2 posted 09-03-2021 01:49 PM

Thank You Jerry, raising the tool rest helped quite a bit.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

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Lazyman

7934 posts in 2626 days


#3 posted 09-03-2021 02:09 PM

I can’t see the end but I assume that is a carbide tool? Tool rest should be set so that the cutter is at the same height as the center. Unless you are using a cupped carbide cutter, keep the blade flat. You can probably back the tool rest away from the bowl a little. Having a little room may actually make it easier to see what you are doing. I would keep the speed under 700 RPM.

I would shape the outside first. This will define the overall shape, inside and out. Pay attention to how much thickness you are leaving for shaping the inside. After the outside is mostly done, except for final finishing pass and sanding, begin working the inside starting at the rim and work your way in. You can still make passes that work inward but start with short passes and make them progressively longer to maintain a nice smooth curve. You want as much thickness as possible as you get the rim to the target thickness and then work the thickness inward and downward.

Carbide tools are less likely to catch so are pretty safe for newbies compared to learning to use a HSS bowl gouge on the inside of a bowl.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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DS

3949 posts in 3659 days


#4 posted 09-03-2021 02:11 PM

Can you reverse the spin of your lathe so you are working on the front side?

Turning the insides of bowls still makes me a bit nervous, but, trying to work from the backside of the lathe would unnerve me all by itself.
Fortunately, my Jet 1642EVS can reverse direction.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#5 posted 09-03-2021 02:23 PM

Thanks for the additional tool rest information Lazyman, I was wondering about that exact thing. As to the cutter being cupped or not I don’t really know…..here is a couple of views of it.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#6 posted 09-03-2021 02:26 PM

Yes, I get that DS but unfortunately, my lathe is not able to reverse. Thank you for your comment.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

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Lazyman

7934 posts in 2626 days


#7 posted 09-03-2021 04:00 PM

That is a standard cutter not a cupped one. It is best to just leave it flat on the toolrest.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#8 posted 09-03-2021 04:20 PM

Thanks Nathan

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

#9 posted 09-05-2021 06:20 AM

In addition to what others have said, I would adjust your tool rest so that the end that is inside the bowl is more towards the center of the bottom. It’ll give you more room to maneuver and give you more control at the tool rest end. You do not need to be that close to the inside-side of the bowl.

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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BurlyBob

9322 posts in 3504 days


#10 posted 09-05-2021 06:39 AM

I’ve made 80+ bowls using a bandsaw jig, spindle sander, stationary sander and palm sander. They sure looks a lot safer that fussing with a lathe, tool rest and different gouges. Too each his own. God bless you and your future trials. I am tired of bowl making and looking forward to expanding my skill set.

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LesB

3089 posts in 4681 days


#11 posted 09-05-2021 04:20 PM

To all the other good suggestions made I woud point out that carbide tools do a great job of removing wood but when I get to the final cuts I switch to a steel scraper with a freshly sharpened burr. The high speed steel produces a much better finish and less sanding time.

By the way I am a real fan of Munro’s cupped hollowing bowl tool. It is faster, smoother, and safer for working on inside cuts.
Packard Woodworks carries them, imported from Austrailia. They are expensive but a great tool.

-- Les B, Oregon

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#12 posted 09-05-2021 04:51 PM

Thanks to all for the constructive comments and suggestions. Changing my tool rest height and distance from the work piece made a huge improvement. Just for a progress report, I’ve cut the rabbet on the bottom and removed the blank from the glue block and am now going to work on cutting the bottom. disk.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

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drsurfrat

1024 posts in 425 days


#13 posted 09-05-2021 05:17 PM

Can’t wait to see it finished.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

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Lazyman

7934 posts in 2626 days


#14 posted 09-05-2021 08:57 PM

Great new Dave. Now we just gotta get you to try using bowl gouges. :-) Once you get the hang of them, the carbide tools may just be used for special tasks. I actually stared with HSS tools and added the carbide later.

I forgot to mention before how cool your blank looked. Looking forward to seeing your results.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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adot45

386 posts in 1862 days


#15 posted 09-05-2021 09:45 PM

Thanks Mike, inch by inch but I’ll get there….or somewhere anyway.

Hey Nathan, I started with HSS tools too, well sorta. I bought the set from Benjamin’s Best and tried one or two out and then decided I wasn’t going to use them until I learned how to sharpen them. That was 5 or 6 years ago and they are still sitting there and I still haven’t had the urge to try them…...

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

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