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Dutch elm

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Forum topic by recycle1943 posted 08-31-2021 12:33 PM 434 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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recycle1943

5843 posts in 2861 days


08-31-2021 12:33 PM

I’ve been offered the opportunity of some dutch elm that will be harvested shortly. I will get it in plank form and wet, I guess I need to know if it is worth milling or even saving for future use. I have never used Dutch Elm before so it’s a new experience – anybody have any in their stash ? have you worked with it ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them


13 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2637 posts in 4032 days


#1 posted 08-31-2021 12:55 PM

I have seen some nice furniture at our local Amish store using elm. But American or Dutch or another species? Their furniture comes from Ohio if that helps.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8411 posts in 1821 days


#2 posted 08-31-2021 01:02 PM

I’ve used red elm for various things. It’s nice because it has interlocking grain, which can prevent splitting along the grain. That means finishing can be more difficult, because the interlocking grain makes planing challenging unless you have very sharp tools, but sanding can take care of that.

I also find the grain patterns in elm nice.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4981 posts in 4973 days


#3 posted 08-31-2021 01:14 PM

Whaaat?
“Dutch” elm, sounds like somebody’s pulling your leg. Dutch Elm is a disease, not a tree species!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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recycle1943

5843 posts in 2861 days


#4 posted 08-31-2021 02:11 PM



Whaaat?
“Dutch” elm, sounds like somebody s pulling your leg. Dutch Elm is a disease, not a tree species!

- poopiekat


Correct – I guess I was as confused as well as the donor. Still, will this lumber be similar to wormy chestnut or maybe like wormy any other lumber ? ie: hickory, oak, cherry etc

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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drsurfrat

1024 posts in 425 days


#5 posted 08-31-2021 02:16 PM

Maybe it is a Dutch elm disease resistant species. Good article to overfill your brain with. Says there are 30-40 species…

Whatever species I had I liked. It was similar to ash in grain, darker and much more varied colorations. And as Dave said, it has interlocking grain so it is really good for toughness like mallet heads and handles. I got some green, and it did not smell pleasant. but after drying (I turned a thin bowl) there was no smell at all, even before finishing.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4981 posts in 4973 days


#6 posted 08-31-2021 02:35 PM

In my city, we lost 8,000 American elms last year due to DED. The city has full-time crews managing infected trees. There is one contractor who gets the logs and is certified in disease control. I’ve met him, he won’t sell lumber at retail, but he will sell flooring and other products using condemned trees that he harvests.

Nowadays, all you can get is Siberian elm or other asian species, but they are grossly unattractive compared to the graceful American Elm which is slowly disappearing. I haven’t seen any Asian species milled, but I’d bet it comparable to the American species.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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recycle1943

5843 posts in 2861 days


#7 posted 08-31-2021 04:22 PM

In my city, we lost 8,000 American elms last year due to DED. The city has full-time crews managing infected trees. There is one contractor who gets the logs and is certified in disease control. I’ve met him, he won’t sell lumber at retail, but he will sell flooring and other products using condemned trees that he harvests.

I wonder then if I should discourage any harvesting and suggest they just burn it ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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poopiekat

4981 posts in 4973 days


#8 posted 08-31-2021 04:29 PM


I wonder then if I should discourage any harvesting and suggest they just burn it ?

- recycle1943

I wouldn’t want to buy any elm lumber except from those who harvest in strict accordance with forestry certification. Jeez, around these parts, you cannot even move firewood from one campground to another, due to federal restrictions on DED and Emerald ash borer. Burning only drives the disease carriers to other trees.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7938 posts in 2626 days


#9 posted 08-31-2021 04:36 PM

It may be illegal to transport it without precautions. It is actually a fungus that kills the tree but it is spread by a beetle because as they leave the tree and attack another, they transmit the fungus to the new tree. If you have any elm trees near you, I would not risk it, unless the wood has been kiln dried. All it takes is a couple of beetles to emerge from the wood to spread it and wipe them all out. Best bet is to cut it and burn it immediately to prevent it from spreading. Tell your friend to inspect any nearby elm trees for bark beetles or other symptoms.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8826 posts in 1813 days


#10 posted 08-31-2021 06:58 PM

Dick there is plenty on DED online. Seems DED started near Cleveland, from logs shipped from France in 1931.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26775 posts in 4344 days


#11 posted 08-31-2021 08:26 PM

Elm is a pretty wood. If the pieces are small enough , you could put them in a microwave to kill any living bugs in it. A kiln that gets hot enough might too. First ask if it was cut because it was killed by the disease. If it was offered as dutch elm, it may be from a diseased tree. It might just be a good healthy tree…in which case, you will have some nice hard wood….........Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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recycle1943

5843 posts in 2861 days


#12 posted 08-31-2021 09:54 PM

It’s being harvested because it’s DEAD. That tells me the fungus has already been there and may still be there. I’m going to call them tomorrow and suggest they not try to save any. I don’t need it nor do they – -

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

8263 posts in 3443 days


#13 posted 08-31-2021 10:31 PM

Oh so its off the radar!

Dick (and other contributors)
It all makes for interesting reading regarding Elm Trees and their tragic history in the USA that’s fr sure.
Along with the quarantine issues that may have to be considered when obtaining timber
Antman27 and I collected a huge stack of Bunya pine, I couldnt use it in the role I wanted due to dormant infestation, but Anthony pumped out a lot of good products. Just goes to show.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/robscastle/blog/130352

May suit may not.

Thanks for the education guys!

-- Regards Rob

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