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Forum topic by Heathos posted 08-30-2021 01:52 PM 461 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Heathos

5 posts in 421 days


08-30-2021 01:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mid-century style plans modern

Hello,
As I look at available project plans online or in books, I find that the style is too traditional for my liking. If it has spindles or curvy legs or other pieces I don’t want it in my home. I’m having a hard time finding modern furniture designs. Can anyone recommend a good source with detailed plans. I’m a big fan if mid-century danish style pieces. Thanks


10 replies so far

View drsurfrat's profile

drsurfrat

1103 posts in 475 days


#1 posted 08-30-2021 03:01 PM

You might approach it by searching for famous names of the era (e.g., Eames?). Then, as you look there may be some blog or posting with plans available. Not as efficient as thumbing through a book, but gets you a good variety. Or you may just run across a book reference…

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9254 posts in 1863 days


#2 posted 08-30-2021 03:51 PM

Sounds like walking through Ikea with a camera would get you a lot of info. For reference a dollar bill is exactly 6” long. Nobody bats an eye if you lay a bill on something, pull out a ruler and they get all itchy.

-- Think safe, be safe

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

1120 posts in 4264 days


#3 posted 08-30-2021 04:51 PM

Checkout this guy. He has YouTube channel also.
https://www.foureyesfurniture.com/

View Heathos's profile

Heathos

5 posts in 421 days


#4 posted 08-30-2021 06:03 PM



Checkout this guy. He has YouTube channel also.
https://www.foureyesfurniture.com/

- hotbyte


This is EXACTLY what I’m looking for. Thank you

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1440 posts in 3788 days


#5 posted 08-31-2021 08:33 AM

The expression “mid century” was unambiguous until the end of XX th century.
I suggest using “mid XX th century” (if that is what you mean).
Otherwise, what will one use in 2050?

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2299 posts in 2938 days


#6 posted 08-31-2021 09:48 AM

With the exception of kidney tables, you may find Contemporary, Shaker, Chinese, and Danish modern to be very close with the exception of finish. All are based on simple pleasing proportions. Take a Campaign chest, change the feet, paint it black and it is Chinese. Paint it bright blue, it is Contemporary. Finish in teak, Danish Modern. Along with Kidney tables, I do not miss “Silver Fox”, “Limed Oak and several other fad finishes from the era.

Don’t give up on curves. Sure, we both may loathe “Queen Anne”, but much contemporary work is done with curves. Long graceful ones.

Look at the work of Krenoiv and others. Back issued of FWW are full of the kinds of designs I think you seek in the readers gallery. I much like the slightly earlier Green & Green and some of the Mission. Wright was one of the first with extensive use of plywood even though he was quite a few years earlier. Eames, Bauhaus, Parsons.
Detail plans are not going to be easy though. With CAD, not too hard to go from a picture to a design.

FWIW,
“Mid-Century Modern” is the accepted term for a specific architectural style. Like many terms in English it is ambiguous, but it is what it is. The furniture style is more often called “contemporary”, though that could be even more ambiguous from a language standpoint, it is the accepted term.

Ikea even has disposable measuring tapes for customer use. Measuring is not an issue.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8761 posts in 4087 days


#7 posted 08-31-2021 02:54 PM

You could always buy them from TED.
He’s stolen some of the best plans out there! :-)

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

7576 posts in 1878 days


#8 posted 08-31-2021 02:57 PM


You could always buy them from TED.
He’s stolen some of the best plans out there! :-)

- shipwright

Over on the beer swap thread I posted info on how to download all 16,000 of Ted’s fabulous plans for free.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View MarkCh's profile

MarkCh

76 posts in 516 days


#9 posted 09-01-2021 01:28 AM

Michael Crow, “Mid Century Modern Furniture” has decent designs and a nice intro.
I haven’t actually made anything from this yet, mostly because my skill level is still in the “everything has to be a box” phase. For modern-modern I crib from BluDot, Ethnicraft, and whatwemake. As long as I don’t sell anything, I figure it’s fine, and this has just been inspiration for three pieces (two identical nightstands and a vanity). There is a high-end retailer near me that sells Ethnicraft where I spent a morning poking around in, looking at all sorts of places that “normal” people don’t, like backs, leg attachments, close ups on joinery, etc.

The proportions and accents are really everything. My girlfriend is formally trained in design, and she can spend a couple of hours banging out a plant stand on a chop saw, and it looks awesome. I spend 2 months making a vanity and, well, it’s a box.

View mrg's profile

mrg

886 posts in 4288 days


#10 posted 09-01-2021 11:17 AM

Have you tried the local library? My library has plenty of books on furniture design that includes mid century modern which is what I also like. These books had plans with cultists etc.

-- mrg

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