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Forum topic by nnywoodworks posted 08-27-2021 03:25 PM 1171 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nnywoodworks

7 posts in 271 days


08-27-2021 03:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: roy underhill spring pole lathe hand tool traditional grinder drill press non-electric

Hey everybody,

I’ve been a long time lurker, but decided to take the plunge and sign up. I’ve been into woodworking in various forms for many years, but more recently got bit by the hand tool bug. Something about it is just more relaxing and enjoyable, and I appreciate the quiet, less dusty shop conditions also!

I’ve accumulated quite the collection of hand tools at this point, and now I’m at the stage where I’m looking into outfitting a separate shop where I can keep everything strictly traditional, with only hand tools (think Roy Underhill).

My question for everybody is what other hand powered tools and devices (aside from hand tools) do you find either essential, interesting, or just fun to use? I’m considering a hand crank bench grinder, a hand powered drill press and a spring pole lathe (I currently have an electric lathe in my “normal” shop). Just curious what other interesting tools may be out there that I’m unaware of and what other people had for thoughts?

I’d like to be able to make or repair more or less whatever might come along (related to wood products and hand tools), all with non-electric options, even if it may be harder and slower.

Thanks!


25 replies so far

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

1026 posts in 2491 days


#1 posted 08-27-2021 03:55 PM

If you’ve got the room a shave horse is a handy thing to have around.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View nnywoodworks's profile

nnywoodworks

7 posts in 271 days


#2 posted 08-27-2021 04:05 PM

Good idea Mike. I was so focused on mechanized or moving things, that I completely overlooked a shave horse. I’ll have to put some thought into layout space to see if I can justify the footprint of one.

View SMP's profile

SMP

5307 posts in 1362 days


#3 posted 08-27-2021 04:18 PM

The hand crank grinders are a pain to use (unless you have a second person or monkey to crank it for you) I would rather have one of the sit down pedal powered ones. have only seen one come up on my local CL but it was a few hundred so I passed.

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nnywoodworks

7 posts in 271 days


#4 posted 08-27-2021 11:59 PM

Do you mean one of the traditional grinders with the large wheel (compared to the hand crank anyway)? Would it get enough use to justify the floor space? I pictured that as something that would more likely be seen in a traditional blacksmith shop.

On the subject of traditional shop equipment, does anybody have any good sources of information for what would have traditionally been in a wood shop in say, the late 1800s?

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

31875 posts in 4140 days


#5 posted 08-28-2021 12:05 AM

Hmmm going to cut any miters?

Then maybe a good mitre box and saw…instead of the motorized ones…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1749 posts in 1360 days


#6 posted 08-28-2021 12:16 AM

Woodcarving with hand tools has many forms from whittling to chip carving, figure carving, relief, sculpture. The possibilities are endless.

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

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SMP

5307 posts in 1362 days


#7 posted 08-28-2021 01:11 AM



Do you mean one of the traditional grinders with the large wheel (compared to the hand crank anyway)? Would it get enough use to justify the floor space? I pictured that as something that would more likely be seen in a traditional blacksmith shop.

On the subject of traditional shop equipment, does anybody have any good sources of information for what would have traditionally been in a wood shop in say, the late 1800s?

- nnywoodworks

If you wanna know, this is a great book to start, and you can even build the items the same way as “Thomas” does. Many bloggers have done so so you can see pictures as well etc

https://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/the-joiner-and-cabinet-maker-1

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1673 posts in 3956 days


#8 posted 08-28-2021 09:38 AM

Have a look here:
https://www.mortiseandtenonmag.com/blogs/blog/watch-a-human-powered-bandsaw-at-work
better view of the mechanism:
https://www.mortiseandtenonmag.com/blogs/blog/the-human-powered-bandsaw

One doesn’t need to collect a lot of tools before starting to do wood working. (Although collecting tools is a legitimate activity).
Search for the Paul Sellers book “essential woodworking hand tools”.
And visit his various web sites.
His site “common woodworking” is a good place to start.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3733 posts in 1058 days


#9 posted 08-28-2021 09:55 AM

I am with Sylvain on Paul Sellers, his way of teaching suits me. He has a habit of showing two or three way to go about a task in the event you don’t have every tool on hand. And as bandit has said a miterbox is very handy to have. This list can go on forever. The hand tool bug is a strong one.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2378 posts in 3106 days


#10 posted 08-28-2021 10:44 AM

I once saw someone put a foot treadle on a 6 inch hand crank grinder. Allowed two hand use.
The best tools for sharpening saws, chisels, planes etc.
Often overlooked is flywheels. They can make a big difference in hand powered rotary tools.
Of course, it all depends on what you want to make.
I think FWW had a design for a foot crank fret saw. Small walking beam.

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tvrgeek

2378 posts in 3106 days


#11 posted 08-28-2021 10:44 AM

I once saw someone put a foot treadle on a 6 inch hand crank grinder. Allowed two hand use.
The best tools for sharpening saws, chisels, planes etc.
Often overlooked is flywheels. They can make a big difference in hand powered rotary tools.
Of course, it all depends on what you want to make.
I think FWW had a design for a foot crank fret saw. Small walking beam.

View nnywoodworks's profile

nnywoodworks

7 posts in 271 days


#12 posted 08-28-2021 07:09 PM

Bandit, the mitre box is another good one that I had overlooked. Now that I think of it, I’ve seen Roy use one in his shop on more than one occasion.

Phil, I’ve got a couple carving tools for the shop, as well as a small roll I take when we go camping. At this point, I wouldn’t trust myself to attempt carving on anything I’ve put much shop time into, but I do like to dabble with it once in a while. I’ve got a Pfeil gouge in the size that Paul recommended for spoon carving and I’ve tried a few things with that so far.

SMP, I just watched the wood wright shop episode the other day, where Chris talked about this book (free on the PBS app). I was considering buying it, so it’s good to hear recommendations from others. I know Chris is trying to sell something, so I don’t like to just take his word for it.

Sylvain, I actually came across Mortise and Tenon a month or so ago and had been reading through some of their content. I hadn’t seen the foot powered bandsaw yet, though. That looks interesting. I see that the article on that page mentions most of the items that have been discussed on this post to date. Have you purchased their magazine? I’ve been wondering if it is worth it or not?

On the topic of Paul Sellers, it’s funny you bring him up, because I would say he is what started the hand tool itch with me. I came across him a few years ago and have been following him ever since. I have his essential hand tool book and have read it more than once. It definitely has a wealth of knowledge within it. My hand tool collection is at the point it is today, mostly by following his guidance. Between his blog, common woodworking, YouTube and woodworking masterclasses, he really goes into detail on a lot of topics.

I admit at this point, my acquisition of hand tools has gone beyond the required basics, and it might be another hobby that equals or surpasses actual woodworking at times…

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

4836 posts in 3406 days


#13 posted 08-28-2021 07:40 PM

Do you have a router plane?

-- Petey

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3733 posts in 1058 days


#14 posted 08-28-2021 09:05 PM

I love my wireless router!

View Bearcontrare's profile

Bearcontrare

373 posts in 593 days


#15 posted 08-28-2021 10:15 PM

Most hand cranked bench grinders have not been serviced in 60 – 70 years. This makes them a PITA to use. Once the ancient crud is removed and all the gears freshly lubricated it makes a WORLD of difference.

A hand cranked drill press, either a post drill or a bench mounted model is very handy. I have a couple of them and love using them.

A treadle jig saw is a really neat thing to use. Original, all cast-iron models can be costly, but functional saws can be made either from scratch or belt driven models adapted to run by foot power.

An online search of foot powered woodworking machinery will produce some interesting information on items that have been produced over the years.

-- Barry, in Maryland

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