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Forum topic by MrRon posted 08-23-2021 11:39 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

6184 posts in 4484 days


08-23-2021 11:39 PM

I spent a few hours designing a jig. Everything went along fine up to the end, when I discovered I drilled the wrong sized holes. This has been my situation ever since I can remember; I’ve been at it on and off for 60+ years. I try to take my time and think through every step of a project. My question is: How many others produce a project that turns out 100% perfect? No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to reach 100%. Sometimes, I can make a repair and salvage the project, but I can never reach 100%. Maybe I should find a new hobby.


21 replies so far

View Richard Lee's profile (online now)

Richard Lee

438 posts in 2016 days


#1 posted 08-23-2021 11:41 PM

Trust me you are not alone, wont matter what the hobby mistakes happen.

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Craftsman on the lake

3882 posts in 4679 days


#2 posted 08-24-2021 12:02 AM

There is only one thing I’ve made with my hands in my life that I wouldn’t make any changes on. Everything else has some flaws that others, but often only I, would notice. And if you made it you always see it. Of course I was once told by a guitar craftsman that the sign of a true craftsman is the one that can hide his own mistakes. Implying of course that there are always mistakes.
That being said. If the thing works or you can get it to work then forgive thyself and move on to the next thing. You’re worth it. Save the criticism for someone else more deserving. It’s more fun that way! ;-)

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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corelz125

3721 posts in 2217 days


#3 posted 08-24-2021 12:08 AM

I’ll be happy with 65% perfect. Figuring out how to fix those mistakes is what makes you better.

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EarlS

4751 posts in 3589 days


#4 posted 08-24-2021 12:15 AM

Some of my best design ideas came out of trying to hide/fix something I missed. It seems like I can always see the solution to the problem a minute after I cross the point of no return. Sometimes I can stand it and start over. But there are plenty of times I just have to move on.

You’re not the only one.

I think striving for “perfection” is what keeps woodworking so interesting. There is just so much to learn and even after you learn how to do it, you have to practice until you get good at it, then on to the next thing.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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gdaveg

361 posts in 443 days


#5 posted 08-24-2021 12:25 AM

MrRon,

No projects so far without something I wished had not happened. Often mine come from going too fast, or is it my mind is going too slow….

-- Dave, Vancouver, WA & Tucson, AZ

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CWWoodworking

2207 posts in 1420 days


#6 posted 08-24-2021 12:37 AM

This might be seen as unimaginative, but the best products/things ive built have come out of a system for building things.

The more you repeat, the better you get at it.

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bilyo

1406 posts in 2344 days


#7 posted 08-24-2021 01:08 AM

There is no such thing as perfection, particularly in woodworking. The true indication of a craftsman is his ability to repair, hide, or make use of his mistakes.

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pottz

20639 posts in 2225 days


#8 posted 08-24-2021 01:17 AM

yeah if i get 90% right i call it perfect.i stopped worrying about perfection a long time ago.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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BB1

2440 posts in 2089 days


#9 posted 08-24-2021 01:35 AM

I had a close to perfect picture frame that I ended up drilling thru the front when doing some pilot holes for the backer hardware. I saw it as a reminder not to be too proud…haha. Fixed it such that likely only I would spot the holes (yep…did it multiple times before I got the tape on my drill bit to guide my depth).

I think with most projects there will be something that isn’t “100%” – only a LJ might see the issue. ;) Don’t give up the hobby. I get frustrated too, but then I reflect on all the less that perfect projects that are in daily use.

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cracknpop

520 posts in 3590 days


#10 posted 08-24-2021 02:07 AM

I believe only once have I had a project completed without a hitch. It was a nice oak box, dovetail corners and all, I made to hold my Dad’s ashes. 2 days later we buried it in concrete.

All other projects have been Philippians 3:13-14 in action… “I know I am not perfect, but I will set aside the past mistakes and keep pressing on towards perfection.” (Rick Snider translation)

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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Rich

7454 posts in 1830 days


#11 posted 08-24-2021 03:45 AM

I’ve invested a great deal of time into learning touch-up and repair. With that, my batting average on producing flawless projects is 1000.

Sometimes it’s flaw in the wood that you can’t work around. Sometimes it’s an error in my work. Whatever it is, being able to repair it is critical. The old sawdust and glue stuff might work for some, but not for me.

Here’s a tiny bit of what I use (the photo is from 2018):

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

4820 posts in 1147 days


#12 posted 08-24-2021 04:48 AM

For me its hit or miss. Some projects turn out 100%. then the next one I’ll make some stupid mistake. Like making box sides too long or too short by not taking into account the thickness of the front and back. Or cutting dados in the wrong side and making two “left” pieces, or drilling holes perfectly the same on 2 pieces when they were supposed to be mirrored. Or one of the thousand other mistakes you can make in woodworking that you didn’t even know were possible UNTIL you make them lol.

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RyanGi

83 posts in 278 days


#13 posted 08-24-2021 04:52 AM

Just something to consider….if it was 100% perfect, I’d just assume it was made by a machine. Even the finest made pieces, from the finest craftsmen, have minor flaws somewhere…it’s what makes them handmade and unique. I’d take that over having one of a thousand copies made in some factory, any day. Be proud of your quest to be the best craftsman you can be, but be humble enough to know that none of us are perfect!

-- Ryan/// I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar

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Rich

7454 posts in 1830 days


#14 posted 08-24-2021 05:02 AM


I believe only once have I had a project completed without a hitch.

- cracknpop

Good point. That begs the question—what constitutes 100%? I’d honestly have to say that very few of my bigger pieces have progressed without a hitch. Depending on the threshold for defining a hitch, it might be zero.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Kelly

3796 posts in 4185 days


#15 posted 08-24-2021 05:34 AM

There it is:


Some of my best design ideas came out of trying to hide/fix something I missed. It seems like I can always see the solution to the problem a minute after I cross the point of no return. Sometimes I can stand it and start over. But there are plenty of times I just have to move on.

You re not the only one.

I think striving for “perfection” is what keeps woodworking so interesting. There is just so much to learn and even after you learn how to do it, you have to practice until you get good at it, then on to the next thing.

- EarlS


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