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Forum topic by boomerk posted 08-13-2021 05:47 PM 478 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boomerk

23 posts in 1612 days


08-13-2021 05:47 PM

Looks like I will be learning something new. I have never really tried to replace the veneer on a piece of furniture but one of my wife’s friends wants me to replace the veneer on an old sewing machine table. The old veneer is off but there is a thin layer of wood beneath it that is glues to the actual wood top. This layer is mostly gone too. Being unfamiliar with this I thought I should seek some advice on how to go about this. What is the thin layer that goes between the wood top and the actual veneer. I assume it is to help smooth out the surface. Any advice I can get would be appreciated. I have pictures if anyone want to see them. Hopefully this is enough information to ge some dialogue started.

Byron

-- Poppy's Woodchips - I don't need therapy. I need my workshop.


15 replies so far

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OldBull

541 posts in 582 days


#1 posted 08-13-2021 05:52 PM

I assume it is the backing on the veneer, however I just learned. I will take a pic shortly. If it is sort of rough looking it is the backing. The backing is already glued to the wood grain when you recieve it.

The first pic is when I accidentally sanded through the top woodgrain. The second pic is of the top woodgrain (left) and the underside on the right (backing).

This was Allwood “2 ply”, I purchased it from Rockler. It performed great for my first time veneer. I used Titebond cold press veneer and it performed flawlessly.

The peel and stick is considered low quality.

The grain on my backing ran opposite the actual (front) wood grain.

Giant tip for first time veneer. Sand nothing until your ready to put a finish on or you may wear through. This veneer was pretty thick but I sanded everytime I saw a flaw and I should have just let it go to the end, luckily this was the bottom and does not show.

I tried to use a standard “band it” cutter on the veneer and it did not work well, I ended up following a suggestion from a fellow Lumberkock member and used a carpet knife. Band it worked good on actual edge banding.
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splintergroup

6038 posts in 2509 days


#2 posted 08-13-2021 06:56 PM

If the wood underneath is solid (not plywood), Good chance what you are seeing is the glue used to bond the veneer.

Just a simple card scraper can usually remove it, either way you want to rebond to wood, not old glue and the surface should be free of defects like gouges and splits

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OldBull

541 posts in 582 days


#3 posted 08-13-2021 07:14 PM

Apology to all, I accidentally mispelled “lumberjock” as the 2 keys were close together, I have asked for help fixing it.

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splintergroup

6038 posts in 2509 days


#4 posted 08-13-2021 07:58 PM



Apology to all,

- OldBull

I didn’t even notice until you pointed it out 8^)

Don’t worry, we all have fat fingers!

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boomerk

23 posts in 1612 days


#5 posted 08-13-2021 09:19 PM

I’m going to have to figure out how to put my pictures in here so I can show what I am working with. Back soon.

-- Poppy's Woodchips - I don't need therapy. I need my workshop.

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CaptainKlutz

5031 posts in 2781 days


#6 posted 08-13-2021 11:45 PM

boomerk
You might like this hide glue blog by one of LJ’s resident veneer experts – shipwright. There are various veneer tips/tricks embedded as he shows how to use hide glue.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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shipwright

8760 posts in 4084 days


#7 posted 08-13-2021 11:57 PM

It is and has been common practice to apply a layer of lesser veneer over bare wood to help prevent the telegraphing through of glue lines and joints before application of the finish veneer. This is especially important with the thin veneers that are common today.
If the sewing machine is more than about fifty years old it will be veneered with hide glue and you can remove the remaining old veneer by applying heat and moisture together (spray bottle and iron). There is no need to remove all the old glue if you re-veneer with hide glue.
When working with heat around hide glue the rule of thumb is no hotter than you can touch. Hide glue is made of the same stuff you are. If it burns you it will burn the glue.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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shipwright

8760 posts in 4084 days


#8 posted 08-13-2021 11:59 PM

The link above to my blog didn’t work when I tried it. Here it is.
https://www.lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/5437

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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boomerk

23 posts in 1612 days


#9 posted 08-14-2021 12:50 AM

Okay. I’ve had some good response on this and a question answered about the thin layer between the actual veneer and the glued up wood that the top is formed from. Now I need to know something about getting the actual veneer and something to use between the veneer and wood. I will, of course be sanding the wood base down as smooth as I can get it but I would feel a lot more comfortable using the “liner” in there. Where is a good place to get veneer? I’ll have to order it in I guess because my local options are Lowes and Home Depot. Probably not a stock item where I live.

Here is a picture of the wood on the cabinet top.

Thanks Byron

-- Poppy's Woodchips - I don't need therapy. I need my workshop.

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shipwright

8760 posts in 4084 days


#10 posted 08-14-2021 03:45 AM

Certainly Wood is my favourite source because they have a good selection of thicker veneers. When it comes to veneer (IMHO) thicker is better. I like 1/16”.
https://certainlywood.com/woodmenu2.php?category=Special%20Thickness%20Veneers

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Lazyman

8257 posts in 2674 days


#11 posted 08-15-2021 02:54 AM

Looking at your picture it is hard to tell for sure how level the surface is. If any of that second level came off when the top veneer came off, you may either need to piece in some veneer to level it or remove that layer completely. Small gaps between those pieces are okay but you don’t want any steps or wide gaps. If pieces are added, it may need to be scraped, planed or sanded to the level everything out.

+1 on shipwright’s hide glue veneer blog. I was able to tackle a pretty large veneer project largely from what I learned from his blog and your small table top would be a good first project to learn from AND be successful.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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boomerk

23 posts in 1612 days


#12 posted 08-27-2021 06:56 PM

The base layer is not too bad but I will certainly give it a good going over before I glue anything down. I had cataract surgery yesterday so it will be a few days before I can do anything. Doctor said no sawdust for 2 weeks. After that I will be on several cabinet jobs with VCB for a few weeks.

Thanks for all the advice and tips. See ya soon.
Byron

-- Poppy's Woodchips - I don't need therapy. I need my workshop.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1465 days


#13 posted 08-27-2021 08:45 PM

If it isn’t hide glue, you can use a router/sled to take off the rest of the veneer if it gives you trouble. My guess is Paul is correct and it is hide glue.

You can use bondo to patch defects and help getting a smooth surface.

If the top is removable you can also use a drum sander to smooth it out.

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boomerk

23 posts in 1612 days


#14 posted 09-01-2021 03:24 PM

Speaking of glue, what is a good reliable glue to use for veneer? I was thinking contact cement but I am open for suggestions. It just needs to be simple.

TIA
Byron

-- Poppy's Woodchips - I don't need therapy. I need my workshop.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3063 posts in 888 days


#15 posted 09-01-2021 04:03 PM

My kitchen table that I bought for $25 forty years ago. It had two layers of veneer on it that I steamed off with an iron. It is solid oak with a lighter colored 2” border that while making the top square is compensating for a non square oak top. I found it odd but looked nice so I finished it like that. Has maple legs (big). It was the first piece of furniture my wife and I purchased. Still in the kitchen and it is just “us”. Anyway I thought I share that to confirm the possible two veneer theory.

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