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What generator to power a miter saw?

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Forum topic by dbreckejn posted 08-09-2021 10:06 AM 746 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbreckejn

2 posts in 70 days


08-09-2021 10:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: generator power miter saw question

Hey guys,

I am looking for an ideal generator to power my miter saw, in case there is a blackout. I was thinking about buying Honda generator, this one in particular, EU2200i:

https://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/models/eu2200i
https://generatorist.com/honda-eu2200i-review
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLqSPvvO_8U

What do you think? It is quite expensive and I would love to hear your thoughts whether it works or not, or if you have any advice for a generator that will help me power my woodworking equipment.

Thanks again.


15 replies so far

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

1108 posts in 3592 days


#1 posted 08-09-2021 12:02 PM

Just curious, if just for the saw, what are you going to do for lights?
larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2638 posts in 4033 days


#2 posted 08-09-2021 01:40 PM

I missed something. Why would you need a mitersaw during a power outage? I would worry about my refrigerator and freezer and my heat

View gtrgeo's profile

gtrgeo

191 posts in 1670 days


#3 posted 08-09-2021 09:28 PM

Assuming the Honda has enough power for you, I might suggest the Ryobi 2300 watt model. I use one for my RV and have been very pleased with its performance. It may be a hair louder than the Honda but I found it has more power than the Honda and is substantially less expensive. My friends Honda 2200 would not run my trailer’s AC but my Ryobi will at lower elevations.

I know Honda is know for reliability, I have owned their motorcycles and currently own one of their lawnmowers. My Ryobi generator has had no issues for the 3 years I have been using it and always starts on the second or third pull. Like any small engine make sure to keep fresh gas in it and use a fuel stabilizer to prevent issues.

George

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LesB

3092 posts in 4683 days


#4 posted 08-09-2021 10:11 PM

Generator manufacturere always advertice the “surge” power of their generators not the “run” power. In the case of the Honda 2200 it actually runs at 1800 watts. So if you saw draws 1500 watts and less than 15 amps the generator will run it but that will be at or near the max load for the generator. Running most tools at max can wear them out sooner.

I think you should go up to at least 3000 watts or even better 4000 watts of surge
Generac which has a good reputation has a 3500 watt model for under $1000.

-- Les B, Oregon

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northwoodsman

672 posts in 4986 days


#5 posted 08-09-2021 10:36 PM

I purchased a Generac GP2500i during last winters black-out. It’s an inverter type. It’s light and very quiet, you can carry on a conversation standing next to it without raising your voice. You can link 2 of them together. I paid $580.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2207 posts in 1419 days


#6 posted 08-10-2021 12:14 AM

If I were really worried about it, I’d just get a battery chopsaw.

Not much difference in price, could be cheaper. You can also use the batteries for other things and don’t have to listen to a generator.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8832 posts in 1814 days


#7 posted 08-10-2021 03:46 AM

I used to carry a 7500 start up, 5000 running watt unit in the truck. Once you are using electricity remotely, you’ll want to do more than a chop saw. It could do the chop saw, a small compressor, and charge all the batteries. Of course that was during a time you were lucky to get 35 screws in with a charge.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3386 posts in 3878 days


#8 posted 08-10-2021 03:30 PM

Long ago Onan made a gasoline powered table saw. It seems like that’s the direction to go. Miter saws use a belt. With some engineering, it could be done I suppose.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View controlfreak's profile (online now)

controlfreak

2877 posts in 841 days


#9 posted 08-10-2021 04:07 PM

Why not just get a battery power miter saw? I haven’t tried one but I seem to be seeing them more often.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7613 posts in 2961 days


#10 posted 08-10-2021 04:18 PM

That generator should work well for a 15A 120V miter saw. I would use a short cord and give the saw an extra second or two to allow the generator to ramp back up after the initial current in rush bogs it down. Generators of that size seem to be favorites for camping and tailgating, most very closely resemble the Honda design and for good reason.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Woodnmetal's profile

Woodnmetal

183 posts in 85 days


#11 posted 08-10-2021 04:42 PM

X2^^^ On a good short extension cord and Honda design. If your set on the Honda, I would pick up a good 14G or 12G extension cord, no more than 30’ and you should be good to go.

-- I haven't changed... but I know I'm not the same.

View dbw's profile

dbw

626 posts in 2877 days


#12 posted 09-16-2021 11:50 AM



I missed something. Why would you need a mitersaw during a power outage? I would worry about my refrigerator and freezer and my heat

- ibewjon


If I were really worried about it, I’d just get a battery chopsaw.

Not much difference in price, could be cheaper. You can also use the batteries for other things and don’t have to listen to a generator.

- CWWoodworking


+1 on both of these.

-- Woodworking is like a vicious cycle. The more tools you buy the more you find to buy.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5848 posts in 2462 days


#13 posted 09-16-2021 05:55 PM

I bought a generator from Costco several years back for the fridge/freezer during blackouts. Had a nine hour one a few months back but most only last for an hour or two (rural area).
$400 delivered

The thing I searched for and like is the “dual fuel” capability, Propane/gasoline. One 20lb barbecue cylinder is supposed to run about 24 hours. Starts up instantly on the propane and no need to deal with old gas in the tank or carb.

Rated a tad above 5KW peak, 4KW run, about 10% lower on the propane.

The gas option is nice should I ever need to run longer (by adding a larger tank) or otherwise forgot to fill the “Q” bottles.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8832 posts in 1814 days


#14 posted 09-16-2021 06:54 PM



I missed something. Why would you need a mitersaw during a power outage? I would worry about my refrigerator and freezer and my heat

- ibewjon

I totally missed the blackout part first pass. Yes agree with above. My answer to that if at home is this.

-- Think safe, be safe

View GregQ's profile

GregQ

2 posts in 29 days


#15 posted 09-18-2021 07:57 PM

Also, depends on the mitre saw. My Kapex does not like generators at all due to the electronics in the variable speed and blade braking features.

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