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Walnut end grain cutting board

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Forum topic by Jeppedy posted 08-08-2021 03:49 AM 901 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeppedy

10 posts in 2614 days


08-08-2021 03:49 AM

Topic tags/keywords: end grain cutting board walnut

Starting my first end-grain cutting board, walnut and maple. “Planed” flat with a router jig. Sanding now, and the grain of walnut looks like those pore will never close up or sand smooth.
If I keep sanding, will they smooth out eventually?
Do I need a sanding sealer? Pore filler?

Any advice appreciated!

-- Jeff, Newbie from Northwest Indiana


16 replies so far

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therealSteveN

8828 posts in 1813 days


#1 posted 08-08-2021 06:40 AM

How are you sanding, and what grit progression are you doing? Routing end grain with a planer bit might fur things up, as much as calm them down. I don’t think I would suggest that, now on face grain it can level you pretty well.

-- Think safe, be safe

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LittleBlackDuck

8083 posts in 2059 days


#2 posted 08-08-2021 10:14 AM

I think those holes you have are far too big. The gap between the two layers will never be sealed.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Rich

7442 posts in 1828 days


#3 posted 08-08-2021 01:42 PM

As someone who has used a router sled many times, I can assure you that it is an ideal method to flatten an end grain board. Any suggestion otherwise is misguided and should be ignored.

Walnut is an ideal wood for cutting boards, but without seeing yours I can’t comment on your specific situation. However, I’ve never seen walnut that’s too porous for an end grain chopping block.

One thing I can say is that you should not use any sort of sanding sealer or filler, but beyond that, you don’t provide enough detail for me to go on.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

594 posts in 2973 days


#4 posted 08-20-2021 12:42 PM



Might be wiser to ignore your advice.

A router and sled are only ideal if all you have is a router.

More ideal for some of us is a widebelt sander.

For others, a cnc is a better choice.

- xedos

Since the OP says it is their first end grain cutting board, it’s probably safe to assume they are fairly new to the hobby and probably don’t have a widebelt sander or a drum sander readily available. But they obviously have a router. Therefore, a router sled would be ideal in that case.

And isn’t a router sled just a manual CNC machine (as it pertains to flattening)?

As for the OP, we need pics to better help figure out the best possible solutions.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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HokieKen

19343 posts in 2377 days


#5 posted 08-20-2021 05:13 PM

I’ve used a router sled to flatten end grain cutting boards. It worked just fine. Would a wide belt sander be better? Sure. If you have access to one, by all means use it. CNC? Seems like the results would be identical to a router sled assuming you have straight guide rails.

Not sure why your Walnut would have such open endgrain. Never had a problem with it myself. Some pics showing exactly what you’re referring to would let us offer better suggestions. I guess the first question that comes to mind is: Are you positive it’s Walnut?

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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HokieKen

19343 posts in 2377 days


#6 posted 08-20-2021 05:17 PM

And I hate to address this but I will anyway…

There is a very big difference between saying:


...it is an ideal method to flatten an end grain board. ...

- Rich

and saying:

...
Assuring people that you have the ideal method to flatten an end grain board …

- xedos

Ugh fellas.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2147 posts in 965 days


#7 posted 08-21-2021 03:40 PM



Might be wiser to ignore your advice.

A router and sled are only ideal if all you have is a router.

More ideal for some of us is a widebelt sander.

For others, a cnc is a better choice.

- xedos


LOL, kinda the same thing as me posting an air sander right?
Look up hypocrite in the dictionary.

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toolie

2210 posts in 3867 days


#8 posted 08-21-2021 03:48 PM

Where’d the OP go?

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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Andre

4733 posts in 3045 days


#9 posted 08-21-2021 04:05 PM



Where d the OP go?

- toolie

LOL! Yup, shaking his head and quickly realized when you ask for free advice, ya get what ya pay for:)
Projects posted usually clears thing up for me!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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xedos

433 posts in 539 days


#10 posted 09-01-2021 02:09 AM

LOL, kinda the same thing as me posting an air sander right?
Look up hypocrite in the dictionary.

- LeeRoyMan

Sorry bud, not like your sander comment. Ric got on his soapbox and said the ideal way is with a router and every other way was misguided because he thinks he’s the ultimate authority on flattening endgrain. I was not responding to the o.p. at all.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

7442 posts in 1828 days


#11 posted 09-01-2021 03:15 AM


Sorry bud, not like your sander comment. Ric got on his soapbox and said the ideal way is with a router and every other way was misguided because he thinks he’s the ultimate authority on flattening endgrain. I was not responding to the o.p. at all.

- xedos

Somebody’s got a fixation. If only you could differentiate between “an ideal,” and “the ideal.”

This is more sad than funny.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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bigblockyeti

7611 posts in 2959 days


#12 posted 09-01-2021 10:22 AM

I usually start first with gluing everything up so it starts as flat as possible greatly reducing how much the surface needs to be flattened. I don’t use a router else because I’m starting close to as flat as I would get after finishing using a router sled. I start with a belt sander, usually 40 or 60 grit, starting with 40 grit is usually less than 20 seconds per side, after progressively graduating to 120 grit with a belt sander then I switch over to a ROS and progress through 240 grit. Starting with a belt sander is far faster that even the best ROS initially.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

8083 posts in 2059 days


#13 posted 09-01-2021 11:13 AM



... Starting with a belt sander is far faster that even the best ROS initially.
- bigblockyeti

Looks like I know someone that hasn’t used a Rotex!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19343 posts in 2377 days


#14 posted 09-01-2021 12:12 PM

Make that two of us that haven’t used a Rotex LBD ;-)

I will add that I made some endgrain boards as Christmas gifts last year. And what worked best for me to do final flattening was my Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane. With the caveat that you have to dub the edges first to avoid tearout on the ends. And I realize that hand planes aren’t for everyone. I’m not the guy who tells you if you use power tools you’re doing it wrong. I love my electron-eaters :-) But it did work quite the trick for me so I thought I’d throw it into the mix.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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bigblockyeti

7611 posts in 2959 days


#15 posted 09-01-2021 03:10 PM


... Starting with a belt sander is far faster that even the best ROS initially.
- bigblockyeti

Looks like I know someone that hasn t used a Rotex!

- LittleBlackDuck

I have, I was contemplating the big one before the Festool PRO 5 LTD went on sale for $100 a few years ago, so got that. The Rotex was impressive, just not impressive enough for me. Grit for grit a 4×24 has a far greater surface speed than a Rotex, close to the same surface area and 99% of 4×24 belt sanders available have more powerful than any Rotex.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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