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Glue for dining table top?

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Forum topic by RipFence posted 07-31-2021 10:50 PM 410 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RipFence

137 posts in 3909 days


07-31-2021 10:50 PM

Hi Yall:
I’m in the process of building a Stickley 622 dining table out of hard maple. Just finished the base and will start on the top this coming week.
What glue would you recommend for edge gluing the top to make it bullet proof for decades to come? I’m thinking of one specific family member who is fond of making liberal use of all manner of cleaning products. I don’t want to think that 20, 50, or 100 years from now, cleaning products will eventually cause the glue to fail.
Epoxy? Titebond III? Please share your wisdom.
Thanks,
Jim


17 replies so far

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tvrgeek

2264 posts in 2865 days


#1 posted 07-31-2021 11:32 PM

Getting to like powered resin. It has no give though, so I might worry about cross grain. I have used a lot of West System epoxy and of course gallons of PVA.

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Rich

7369 posts in 1805 days


#2 posted 07-31-2021 11:35 PM

I’d just use glue. You’re overthinking it. Any Titebond I, II or III is fine. Hide glue would be a good choice. Unless you’ll be running the table through a car wash, it’s not going to matter.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Richard Lee

425 posts in 1991 days


#3 posted 07-31-2021 11:54 PM



I d just use glue. You re overthinking it. Any Titebond I, II or III is fine. Hide glue would be a good choice. Unless you ll be running the table through a car wash, it s not going to matter.

- Rich

YUp.

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pottz

20145 posts in 2200 days


#4 posted 08-01-2021 12:14 AM



I d just use glue. You re overthinking it. Any Titebond I, II or III is fine. Hide glue would be a good choice. Unless you ll be running the table through a car wash, it s not going to matter.

- Rich


+1 the wood will fail before the glue.as rich said dont worry about it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Rich

7369 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 08-01-2021 12:23 AM

One more note: Since you’re talking about 50 or 100 years in the future (really?), some conservation will be required on the table eventually. That’s just a fact of life. If indeed someone considers the piece to be worthy of the effort, that will be a huge testament to your legacy. Be sure to sign it on the underside for posterity.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Aj2

4032 posts in 3014 days


#6 posted 08-01-2021 01:01 AM

Yellow glue no brown. You will see titebond 3 glue lines. Do not use 3 unless your going to stain it brown
Use #2 or original
Make sure you edges are perfect you can actually thin the glue slightly for a smaller glue line. I’ve found Hardmaple glues easily but Clamp it heavily not to close gaps. To get your glue line as small as possible hard maple is dense and has small open cells for glue to fill.
I’ve made several hard maple tables in the past it’s very challenging and rewarding.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Fred Hargis

7197 posts in 3709 days


#7 posted 08-01-2021 11:21 AM

You are (as mentioned) overthinking this. That said, I’d suggest the powdered resin glue for a different reason, with a caution. The plastic resin glue won’t have “glue creep” (search that term) and your joint will stay smooth for a lifetime. It does however, have a brown color that might show on maple so either extreme care with the glue up, or some of the white powder color changing stuff (Veneer supplies, for one, has it) is needed. One other advantage of this glue is that it’s sandable, so the squeeze out, if any, is easily removed by sanding once it’s dried. One other disadvantage is that it’s a slow cure, so overnight clamps (at least) are needed. Good luck with your top!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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RipFence

137 posts in 3909 days


#8 posted 08-02-2021 04:17 PM

Thanks Trygeek! I’m looking into powdered resin glues now. Do you have a favorite brand? Cascamite? Dap Weldwood?


Getting to like powered resin. It has no give though, so I might worry about cross grain. I have used a lot of West System epoxy and of course gallons of PVA.

- tvrgeek


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RipFence

137 posts in 3909 days


#9 posted 08-02-2021 05:03 PM

Thanks Aj2! I never thought about thinning the glue to make the glue line thinner. Nor did I consider the porosity of the wood in terms of how much glue to apply. Brilliant!


Yellow glue no brown. You will see titebond 3 glue lines. Do not use 3 unless your going to stain it brown
Use #2 or original
Make sure you edges are perfect you can actually thin the glue slightly for a smaller glue line. I’ve found Hardmaple glues easily but Clamp it heavily not to close gaps. To get your glue line as small as possible hard maple is dense and has small open cells for glue to fill.
I’ve made several hard maple tables in the past it’s very challenging and rewarding.
Good Luck

- Aj2


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RipFence

137 posts in 3909 days


#10 posted 08-02-2021 05:05 PM

Thank you Fred! Do you have a favorite brand of plastic resin glue that would be inconspicuous with maple?
Cheers,
Jim


You are (as mentioned) overthinking this. That said, I d suggest the powdered resin glue for a different reason, with a caution. The plastic resin glue won t have “glue creep” (search that term) and your joint will stay smooth for a lifetime. It does however, have a brown color that might show on maple so either extreme care with the glue up, or some of the white powder color changing stuff (Veneer supplies, for one, has it) is needed. One other advantage of this glue is that it s sandable, so the squeeze out, if any, is easily removed by sanding once it s dried. One other disadvantage is that it s a slow cure, so overnight clamps (at least) are needed. Good luck with your top!

- Fred Hargis


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RipFence

137 posts in 3909 days


#11 posted 08-02-2021 05:19 PM

Thanks Rich! Great reminder about signing my work. I’ve been thinking I should have a branding iron made and you may have just nudged me enough to actually order one.


One more note: Since you re talking about 50 or 100 years in the future (really?), some conservation will be required on the table eventually. That s just a fact of life. If indeed someone considers the piece to be worthy of the effort, that will be a huge testament to your legacy. Be sure to sign it on the underside for posterity.

- Rich


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Woodknack

13584 posts in 3596 days


#12 posted 08-02-2021 05:21 PM

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bbc557ci

634 posts in 3290 days


#13 posted 08-02-2021 05:25 PM

I built a cherry table with leaves for the kitchen +/- 30 years ago. Pretty sure I just used Titebond, nothing exotic or special and the top has held together just fine. Same with a smaller table made of ash around the same time. The ash table was used as a stand for a bird cage (small Conure) and the only issue with the top is where the little stinker nibbled on it. Both tables got 2-3 coats of poly as a finish and all is well. I’m a believer in KISS.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

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Fred Hargis

7197 posts in 3709 days


#14 posted 08-02-2021 06:50 PM

The plastic resin glue that’s easiest to find is the Weldwood brand, I usually get mine from Amazon since it’s always fresher than what my local hardware has.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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pintodeluxe

6484 posts in 4029 days


#15 posted 08-02-2021 07:28 PM

For maple or white oak, I always use Titebond II. It’s easy to work with, and has a proven track record. In fact I’ve never had it fail.

On natural walnut projects I use TBIII because it has a darker glue line that looks natural / invisible on walnut.

Best of luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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