LumberJocks

Help repairing a roller stand

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Fotodog posted 07-20-2021 01:08 AM 585 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Fotodog's profile

Fotodog

78 posts in 998 days


07-20-2021 01:08 AM

Hello All,
I’m hoping someone has an idea to fix an old Rockler roller stand so that it doesn’t end up in the landfill. The threaded frame which accepts the tightening rod has stripped, making it worthless. I think the frame is aluminum. I have the tools and experience for woodworking, but no metal working skills. Sending this to a metal shop in my area would be more expensive than buying a new stand.

My only thought so far would be to add a threaded insert to a block of wood, and epoxy that to the frame. Then use a new knob with the shaft sized to the insert. Any thoughts? Thanks!

-- Tim


23 replies so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1413 posts in 1769 days


#1 posted 07-20-2021 01:47 AM

Any chance that putting a C clam on there would squeeze it enough to hold it still?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4867 posts in 2713 days


#2 posted 07-20-2021 04:32 AM

Welcome to club.

Have several various cheap roller stands with stripped threads on locking bolt.

Drilled out the stripped nut, used a short bolt and c-clamp for awhile on one?

Without a welder to fix steel, your options are limited. Finally got fed up and made a better fix.
Ground the old weld nut or stripped threads off to make smooth surface. Then welded a grade 8 coupler nut (1” long) over hole. Used a star knob that allows replaceable bolts, and use grade 3 hex bolt to lock it down. About every 2-3 years, this gorilla grip Klutz has to toss the old stripped bolt and use a new one.

If you can find cup point or dog point (square end) ‘jack’ bolts; they dig in better and don’t need as much torque applied. I welded a piece of 3” flat bar to square head of jack bolt, and it has lasted longest so far.
YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Jake Brain's profile

Jake Brain

67 posts in 3988 days


#3 posted 07-20-2021 10:46 AM

You mite try to use a Heli Coil if there is enough metal. This Youtobe vidil https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79IYC4L68LU

-- Jake Brain, Florida

View SMP's profile

SMP

4746 posts in 1124 days


#4 posted 07-20-2021 12:43 PM



You mite try to use a Heli Coil if there is enough metal. This Youtobe vidil https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79IYC4L68LU

- Jake Brain

yep i have used helicoils to repair all kinds of stuff on cars etc. though it looks like the tightening rid is stripped too. so you may want to buy a new threaded knob to match whatever helicoil insert.

https://www.amazon.com/Knobs-Hand-Wheels/b?ie=UTF8&node=16412791

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7831 posts in 2606 days


#5 posted 07-20-2021 01:30 PM

Looks like steel to me. If it is actually steel, this would be a lot easier if you have a friend who can weld for you. You could simply have them weld a nut over the existing hole. If you take it to a welding shop, they might do it for free or less than $10 if you do all the prep to drill out the old hole, grind off the paint and zinc off the nut beforehand; otherwise, here is how I would address it.
  • I would get a thicker piece of steel and cut (hack saw, angle grinder bench grinder, file) it to the same triangular shape as the piece there and drill the 2 attachment holes to line up with the ones there.
  • Drill 2 more holes further down on the diagonal pieces and tap them to accept 2 more bolts. Remove the plate to do the tapping and enlarge the 2 new holes in the plate to clear the treads of the bolts.
  • I would drill out the old hole larger than the hole in the new plate so that the new bolt passes through it.
  • Drill a new hole exactly where the old tapped hole is and tap it to what ever size bolt you decide you want to use. I would get a new tightening bolt with a nob to match the new hole.
  • Attach the new plate over the old one with 4 bolts (might need longer ones)

Having someone weld a nut on will probably be cheaper.

EDIT: I should have proofread more carefully after editing. Fixed now.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19160 posts in 2357 days


#6 posted 07-20-2021 01:33 PM

Helicoil is best solution but probably too costly to be effective if it’s for a one-time use. Welding a nut on is certainly a good solution too if you have the capability. The simplest solution might be to drill it out and tap for a larger size bolt if you have a tap available.

If you don’t need infinite adjustability in the height, you could just drill a series of holes in the inner bar and use a pin to hold position. Think automobile jack stands.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View Fotodog's profile

Fotodog

78 posts in 998 days


#7 posted 07-20-2021 01:47 PM

Thanks for the replies gentlemen. I think you are correct, it’s a lightweight steel. Welding on a nut would be the simplest solution, but when I have had metal work done before here in San Francisco, all the shops had a minimum fee of $70 – $80.

I’m not sure there’s enough thickness for a heli coil, but that’s great information to know. It’s basically the metal version of the threaded inserts I have used in wood. I’ll do some research.

Kenny, drilling and tapping for a larger bolt sounds like it might be a good solution.

-- Tim

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7831 posts in 2606 days


#8 posted 07-20-2021 01:48 PM

It would seem to me that the Helicoil would not work here (I’ve never used it). It looks to me that the steel, including the rim around the hole is less than about 3/16” thick?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ruscal's profile

Ruscal

111 posts in 397 days


#9 posted 07-20-2021 02:06 PM

Show up at the welding shop an hour before quitting time with a 12 pack.

-- Have a hobby? You should have a business.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4746 posts in 1124 days


#10 posted 07-20-2021 02:23 PM



Thanks for the replies gentlemen. I think you are correct, it’s a lightweight steel. Welding on a nut would be the simplest solution, but when I have had metal work done before here in San Francisco, all the shops had a minimum fee of $70 – $80. I’m not sure there’s enough thickness for a heli coil, but that’s great information to know. It’s basically the metal version of the threaded inserts I have used in wood. I’ll do some research.

Kenny, drilling and tapping for a larger bolt sounds like it might be a good solution.

- Fotodog

do you know what size helicoil you need? i have a couple bags of different sizes. like i need one but have to buy 5 or 10. shouldnt be too much to ship from So Cal to Nor Cal if i have one thst fits its yours

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5754 posts in 2441 days


#11 posted 07-20-2021 04:59 PM

I’d use a “T” nut:

Hammer or pliers to flatten the spikes then drill your stripped hole out to the size of the OD of the T nuts threaded shaft.

Insert the T nut from the inside of the flange (might need to bend the flange outwards slightly).

Generally the tightening of the lock screw will put enough force on the T nut to keep it from spinning, but you could peen around the flange hole with a center punch to displace enough metal to better grab the nuts shaft.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1398 posts in 2321 days


#12 posted 07-20-2021 08:49 PM

Drill out the existing screw hole. Then, get a flanged nut like this and silver solder (braze) it over the larger hole. Silver soldering is strong and is easy to do with nothing more than a propane or Mapp torch. There are lots of web sites and/or videos that show you how. You will need some 56% silver solder (small quantities available on Ebay for under $10), some proper flux, and a torch. The flanged nut will provide additional surface area for brazing and make it even stronger. Then use a larger bolt with a shop made knob.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1398 posts in 2321 days


#13 posted 07-23-2021 09:25 PM

Not sure if the OP is still here. But, for anyone still interested, I think there is a simpler solution. Bolt on a piece of 1/2” to 3/4” wide mild steel 1/8” thick strap using the two existing socket head screws. Or, if the bolts are not long enough, replace them. Then drill and tap a new hole through all three layers of steel. Insert a new bolt with a shop fashioned knob or handle.

View Fotodog's profile

Fotodog

78 posts in 998 days


#14 posted 07-23-2021 11:51 PM

I’m still here, and thanks again guys for your responses. I got busy and was waiting until I had time to work on this to reply, but don’t want anyone to feel like I abandoned the thread. One thing that’s probably not clear in the photo, the 2 bolts attach the legs to the upper support, and allow the legs to hinge open and closed so the stand can fold flat.

I bought a 3/8” tap to see if I could just clean up the existing 3/8” hole, but it was too far gone to work. There’s not enough thickness for heli coils, but that’s great to know for the future. T-nuts won’t work in this situation, because they would interfere with the inner tube sliding sliding up and down.

Bilyo, thanks for the recommendation about silver soldering. That would work, but the expense for the materials would cost more than a new stand. On the plus side, I would have enough for many future projects, and the chance to learn a new skill.

Bolting on a piece of steel would probably work, and I might end up trying that if needed. But I can accomplish the same thing using a piece of strong hardwood and a threaded insert, so that’s what I’ll try first. If the wood isn’t strong enough, I’ll try your idea.

-- Tim

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1398 posts in 2321 days


#15 posted 07-24-2021 03:22 AM


I’m still here, and thanks again guys for your responses. I got busy and was waiting until I had time to work on this to reply, but don’t want anyone to feel like I abandoned the thread. One thing that’s probably not clear in the photo, the 2 bolts attach the legs to the upper support, and allow the legs to hinge open and closed so the stand can fold flat.

If using those bolts are the best/easiest way to fix it, I would be willing to forgo the folding feature. Or, maybe once you have it apart, you can figure a way to have both. If those bolts remain loose to allow the arms to pivot, there is no reason why they can’t stay that way and still hold the new “plate” in place.

I bought a 3/8” tap to see if I could just clean up the existing 3/8” hole, but it was too far gone to work. There’s not enough thickness for heli coils, but that’s great to know for the future. T-nuts won’t work in this situation, because they would interfere with the inner tube sliding sliding up and down.

There are two layers of steel there. Perhaps that is enough to drill out the original hole and re-thread for the next larger size bolt.

Bilyo, thanks for the recommendation about silver soldering. That would work, but the expense for the materials would cost more than a new stand. On the plus side, I would have enough for many future projects, and the chance to learn a new skill.

On Ebay, do a search for “56% silver solder”. There will be many pages. Scroll through and you will find small quantities for under $10 that will be sufficient to do what you need. You are correct. You will also have some left over for future similar repairs if needed. I have used this method to repair several broken band saw blades among other things. It is not much different than soft soldering. You just use a little hotter temps.

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com