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Japanese saw cut always veers right

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Forum topic by jamsomito posted 06-26-2021 03:24 PM 543 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jamsomito

692 posts in 1709 days


06-26-2021 03:24 PM

I love this saw for quick sectioning of boards. If I don’t have a lot of cuts it’s faster and easier than getting out my miter saw or jigsaw, and more pleasant too without the noise and 100% of the dust going airborne.

But for some reason I can’t get my cuts to go straight. They always veer to the right. This is when I’m cutting at the front edge of the board with my hands below the piece. If I switch to the back side and cut with my hands above the piece it’s generally okay, but it’s a little more awkward of a position.

Any tips?


23 replies so far

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

541 posts in 578 days


#1 posted 06-26-2021 03:40 PM

I have just one japanese saw, So I am no pro. This woodcraft article speaks of using the Ryoba styles. I didn’t see any through cuts with these. Something about damaging the cut by the back side blade. Most of the cuts were shallow joinery.

https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/choosing-using-japanese-saws

”“When just starting to use a ryoba saw, it may seem difficult to make a straight cut with such a flexible blade. The secret is to plan your cut so that the kerf you initially make can guide the blade as you finish the cut. Make a cut in stages, as shown below, and you’ll be surprised at the accuracy you can achieve.””

”“Kataba , This saw is designed to take up where the ryoba leaves off. If you have to make a deep or long crosscut with a ryoba, the smooth cut made by the ryoba’s crosscutting teeth will be damaged by the ripping teeth on the opposite side of the blade. The kataba eliminates this problem. ””

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DevinT

2095 posts in 249 days


#2 posted 06-26-2021 04:13 PM

From the picture you uploaded it looks like you aren’t doing a kerfing pass the length of the blade first.

I can demonstrate three ways to do this cut without veering off. Freehand using a kerf, with a block clamped to the piece of wood to guide the saw, and with a guide clamped to cut a kerf (and once you have cut the kerf, you can take off the guide).

With a guide clamped to the wood

Aluminum angle stock makes a great guide

For best precision, lay a free hand on the blade to press it against the makeshift fence provided by your guide block or angle stock.

Freehand by first cutting a kerf line that follows a pencil mark

I find it easiest to push the saw when creating the kerf line, then once you are firmly in he kerf, then apply increasing amounts of force on the pull stroke

-- Devin, SF, CA

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DevinT

2095 posts in 249 days


#3 posted 06-26-2021 04:17 PM

I rarely ever (never?) use the course cutting side of my Ryoba.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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jamsomito

692 posts in 1709 days


#4 posted 06-26-2021 04:17 PM

Hmm, I can definitely see how a kerfing pass would help. I guess I just didn’t think it was necessary. Perhaps it is.

I’m using the finer side for crosscutting.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4952 posts in 1188 days


#5 posted 06-26-2021 04:48 PM

What brand is the saw? If its a decent quality saw it shouldn’t be the saw itself unless you see the plate is bent. If its decent, then its likely your grip, kind of like with golf. Since it doesn’t have a western style grip, most likely you have the handle rotated slightly or are twisting your wrist when using.

What can help regardless is a knife-wall like Paul Sellers uses. Strike a line with a marking knife and chisel out the waste side, the blade will follow that little valley.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9iQ1-kuQ1qY

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jamsomito

692 posts in 1709 days


#6 posted 06-26-2021 04:51 PM

It’s a Suizan saw. Most likely user error, lol.

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SMP

4952 posts in 1188 days


#7 posted 06-26-2021 05:40 PM

Wait, is the board horizontal and you are cutting from top? I generally have better luck clamping it in a vise so it is vertical to the bench.

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jamsomito

692 posts in 1709 days


#8 posted 06-26-2021 06:09 PM



Wait, is the board horizontal and you are cutting from top? I generally have better luck clamping it in a vise so it is vertical to the bench.

- SMP

Yes it is. Don’t have a vise :(

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DevinT

2095 posts in 249 days


#9 posted 06-26-2021 06:23 PM

See the above videos. I saw the way you do (because no vise).

-- Devin, SF, CA

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2247 posts in 1010 days


#10 posted 06-26-2021 06:29 PM

Start the cut, after the first inch or so, tilt the saw back about 60 degrees and score the line ahead for about 3/4” the straighten up and cut until you reach the end of the score, then repeat.
Kind of like riding a teeter totter.
Proper or improper IDK, but this method works easy enough for me.

View Eeyore's profile

Eeyore

125 posts in 499 days


#11 posted 06-26-2021 06:30 PM


I rarely ever (never?) use the course cutting side of my Ryoba.

It’s not the coarse side, that’s the ripping side. Use the big teeth for ripping, and the small teeth for cross-cutting. Anything not directly along the grain is a cross-cut.

-- Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans

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DevinT

2095 posts in 249 days


#12 posted 06-26-2021 06:36 PM

Thanks for explaining this. I was not sure of the function or names.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View Eeyore's profile

Eeyore

125 posts in 499 days


#13 posted 06-26-2021 06:38 PM


Wait, is the board horizontal and you are cutting from top? I generally have better luck clamping it in a vise so it is vertical to the bench.
- SMP

Yes it is. Don t have a vise :(
- jamsomito

Build a low (18” high or so) sawing bench, then hold the board in place with one knee. You’ll be above the board. Really, you should be using a light enough pressure on the saw that you can use your other hand to hold the board in place. Keep your saw sharp and let the tool do the work.

-- Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

2846 posts in 830 days


#14 posted 06-26-2021 07:13 PM

Where you have your hand placed on the handle is also a factor; close to the blade and you will tend to have problems; the farther away the better – and like Eyeore says, let the blade do the work.

Not sure, but I think I recall Stumpy doing a demo with these saws.

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8795 posts in 1865 days


#15 posted 06-26-2021 07:50 PM

One thing nobody has mentioned is that sometimes the saw isn’t set exactly evenly, which will cause it to veer off, even if you’re doing everything correctly. If you’ve tried Devin’s solutions and are still getting curvy cuts, take a file or sharpening stone to the right side of the saw, and take a tiny amount of set off the saw. One or two passes at most. Then try it again. If it cuts straighter, you may have found one that shouldn’t have got past QA on the way out the door.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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