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Forum topic by controlfreak posted 06-19-2021 04:37 PM 431 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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controlfreak

2465 posts in 755 days


06-19-2021 04:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a door leading into my dug out basement that has been in need of replacement for years. It is about 4 1/2’ high and 32” wide. I will be installing a new frame made out of treated 2×6. I like to torture myself by picking joinery that I have never done before so I am looking for some ideas on style and wood to use. Not a big fan of wet treated wood but it may get some splash during rain. That said the untreated plywood and bottom don’t seem to be too badly affected by water.

Here is what my thoughts are:
Would like some old school joinery, I like hand tool work but have power tools too.
Interesting design like frame, rails and maybe grooved or shiplap panels.
Can be painted or solid body stained.
Not sure what glue to use for tenons and such, so far I have only used Titebond but I don’t know if outdoors will be a problem.

I am struggling to fid an inspirational photo to work from. I have tried searching “Barn doors” but the size of those doesn’t seem to get me to what I am looking for. So I am open to any ideas. Here is a picture of the one that needs to go.


14 replies so far

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

627 posts in 3228 days


#1 posted 06-19-2021 05:30 PM

I don’t care for PT wood either but will use it when/if I have to. I’ve used Larch for a few out door projects and have been very pleased with the long term results.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

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ibewjon

2530 posts in 3947 days


#2 posted 06-19-2021 06:03 PM

I like the fiberglass or steel pre made units if one fits your opening. I know you would rather make it, but for some things, wood is not the best, and the door will be heavier than the fiberglass. Just an option..
.

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controlfreak

2465 posts in 755 days


#3 posted 06-19-2021 06:32 PM

The one that is there looked almost that bad when I moved in and that was forty years ago. I don’t think it is that tough of an environment especially if I keep it sealed up. I haven’t even painted it in the last decade or two because it is on the to do list.

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corelz125

3252 posts in 2130 days


#4 posted 06-19-2021 11:34 PM

Can use Ipe or black locust. Then it will be dry wood and last a long time. Titebnd 3 is what you need.

View Eric's profile

Eric

1665 posts in 1027 days


#5 posted 06-20-2021 12:39 AM

You can build a frame for the door and use a ship-lap edge boards for the slats. Cedar would be a good choice, then use a solid color stain to seal it, matching the brick.

If you are running a dehumidifier in the crawl space you will want a good seal. You’re not to far from me.

-- Eric, building the dream

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Sylvain

1299 posts in 3653 days


#6 posted 06-20-2021 08:37 AM

For the jamb to be attached to the masonry, two stiles and a rail connected by a dovetail on top of each styles.
If you want a little challenge, a frame and panel door.

I made a replacement door for my son’s shed. Simple tenon and mortise flat frame: two stiles and three rails. Then screwing a phenolic plywood panel on each side. For long term, paint the edge of the phenolic plywood.

edit: looking at the picture, a jamb would slightly reduce the present access width.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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Sylvain

1299 posts in 3653 days


#7 posted 06-20-2021 09:54 AM

P.S way:
https://paulsellers.com/2019/08/making-a-door/

note: the saddle joint on top of the jamb is not glued which allows some adjustment when installing it.

Read also:
https://paulsellers.com/2019/05/replacing-a-garage-door-and-frame/

When I made the shed door for the son, I installed the hinges on the door and jamb stile before attaching the jamb to the shed masonry. I unscrewed them for jamb installation.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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controlfreak

2465 posts in 755 days


#8 posted 06-20-2021 11:37 AM

Good call Sylvain, I have been getting more and more into Paul Sellers lately and just signed up for the Master Classes subscription. It was both for the content and to give back in exchange for time he puts into educating future woodworkers. As I was going down the rabbit hole via your links I happened across one of your comments.

Anyway here is where I am at in my thoughts. I think I may construct door using treated 2×4 and 2×8 morticed and tenoned. I will assemble the frame (jamb) and attach the door leaving only adjustments to the bottom of each on installation day. The only thing that is bothering me is the door panels. I can do exterior plywood set in grooves or glue up some panels. Cut rebates in the panels to make them semi-flush with the face to minimize the ledge where water could sit. This method leads to my next questions. 1) can I glue up treated boards to make a panel? 2) Does treated wood damage or wear an edge more in chisels & planes?

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stevejack

337 posts in 474 days


#9 posted 06-20-2021 01:55 PM

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controlfreak

2465 posts in 755 days


#10 posted 06-20-2021 03:01 PM



You can build a frame for the door and use a ship-lap edge boards for the slats. Cedar would be a good choice, then use a solid color stain to seal it, matching the brick.

If you are running a dehumidifier in the crawl space you will want a good seal. You re not to far from me.

- Eric


Thanks for the reminder, I just ordered a new dehumidifier to replace the one that quit. I am in downtown Hub City so I guess Ken’s is probably the only place I can find cedar maybe. Where are you?

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

3252 posts in 2130 days


#11 posted 06-20-2021 03:17 PM

Joinery and PT wood you will have to add in when it dries and shrinks.

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controlfreak

2465 posts in 755 days


#12 posted 06-20-2021 03:23 PM

And it loves to twist when that drying happens too.

View Eric's profile

Eric

1665 posts in 1027 days


#13 posted 06-20-2021 03:38 PM

I’m up in Walhalla

-- Eric, building the dream

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bigblockyeti

7436 posts in 2874 days


#14 posted 06-20-2021 04:50 PM


Thanks for the reminder, I just ordered a new dehumidifier to replace the one that quit. I am in downtown Hub City so I guess Ken s is probably the only place I can find cedar maybe. Where are you?

- controlfreak

Are you looking for western red cedar or more local eastern aromatic cedar? I’m less than 20 minutes from you and have a little bit of the latter drying since 11/19.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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