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I have looked everywhere, what is D shape sub base for on a palm router?

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Forum topic by OldBull posted 06-18-2021 04:25 PM 828 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OldBull

458 posts in 449 days


06-18-2021 04:25 PM

I am going to buy a palm router and it is between the colt and dewalt 611. Why are some bases on routers D shaped, I looked everywhere for an answer and couldn’t find it?

Thanks.
Donny


19 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

18380 posts in 2292 days


#1 posted 06-18-2021 04:34 PM

So you can use the flat edge against a fence would be my guess.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2018 posts in 1333 days


#2 posted 06-18-2021 04:39 PM

I have the battery 611. It’s a great router. I like a the D base. If your running against a fence, it’s better to use a round side.

I don’t know which colt your looking at but mine was retired after a couple uses. The base kept slipping and constantly needed adjustment.

The 611 is far superior.

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CWWoodworking

2018 posts in 1333 days


#3 posted 06-18-2021 04:40 PM



So you can use the flat edge against a fence would be my guess.

- HokieKen

The round part is actually better. You don’t have to worry about a fulcrum point because there isn’t one.

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OldBull

458 posts in 449 days


#4 posted 06-18-2021 04:41 PM

Thanks, I was leaning toward the 611, I take it the round against the fence has less friction.

Fulcrum point, meaning you can turn corners? Have you ever used the plunge accessory?

Thanks for the help.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2018 posts in 1333 days


#5 posted 06-18-2021 04:47 PM

If you runs square base against a fence, there is a slight chance a corner can catch and it pulls away from fence. Round there isn’t any corners. You can twist the router 180 degrees, it’s still in the same spot.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8671 posts in 3353 days


#6 posted 06-18-2021 04:48 PM

Fulcrum point, can you put that into a cut example ?
- OldBull

Round base: Put the base against the fence. Twist the router either direction and the distance between the edge of the base and router bit remains the same.

Flat edge base: Put the flat edge against the fence. Twist the router either direction and the distance between the fence and router bit will increase. That is because the flat portion was closer, round portion is further away.

As to ‘why’ there is a flat spot – I got no idea, and none of my routers have one.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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OldBull

458 posts in 449 days


#7 posted 06-18-2021 04:50 PM

Thanks, CWW did a great job explaining :)

View JayT's profile

JayT

6427 posts in 3365 days


#8 posted 06-18-2021 04:51 PM

Don’t know if it was designed that way, but I find the D shaped base great for edge trimming. Having the flat side and corners on the workpiece is more stable than using a round base. The corners really help prevent accidentally tipping the router.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

617 posts in 4900 days


#9 posted 06-18-2021 05:03 PM

Not to be confused with a D-handle base which gives you more control on larger flat surfaces.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View SMP's profile

SMP

4402 posts in 1059 days


#10 posted 06-18-2021 05:09 PM


So you can use the flat edge against a fence would be my guess.

- HokieKen

The round part is actually better. You don’t have to worry about a fulcrum point because there isn’t one.

- CWWoodworking

If you have used a centering cone and ensured it is perfectly center, then sure that works as well. Most people don’t though. With a flat side you don’t really care if the base is perfectly centered.

View MPython's profile

MPython

373 posts in 966 days


#11 posted 06-18-2021 06:22 PM



Round base: Put the base against the fence. Twist the router either direction and the distance between the edge of the base and router bit remains the same.
....

- MrUnix

Sometimes, not always. It depends on the base. If the base is perfectly centered in the router (I.E., centered on the router’s shaft) the distance from the edge of the base to the router bit remains the same. Not all, in fact many, round router bases are not centered, and turning the router with an off centered base as you follow a fence or a template produces an inaccurate cut. The straight side of a “D” shaped base makes following a straight fence easier and produces consistent results. True, turning corners with this set-up is difficult compared to a round base, but accurate straight cuts are a piece of cake.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2018 posts in 1333 days


#12 posted 06-18-2021 07:40 PM

You guys got some crooked bases. :)

No right or wrong answer here. From my personal experience, I have never had issues with the base not being centered. Even if it was, you would have to try to twist the router to make it noticeable. It’s simply not in human nature to move the router around when trying to route a straight line. I messed up 1 panel using straight base. After that I switched to round base.

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MrUnix

8671 posts in 3353 days


#13 posted 06-18-2021 08:57 PM

Sometimes, not always. It depends on the base.
[...]
Not all, in fact many, round router bases are not centered…

I’ll take your word for it, but I have never seen a round base that was intentionally offset/off-center from the bit. I can’t even imagine why such positioning would be desirable, because as you mention, turning a router with an off center base would result in an inaccurate cut unless you are freehanding.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

458 posts in 449 days


#14 posted 06-18-2021 09:48 PM

Thanks everyone for all the help MrUnix, CWW and everyone.

Is the plunge base worth the kit price? (addtional $70 or so).

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2018 posts in 1333 days


#15 posted 06-18-2021 09:49 PM



Thanks everyone for all the help MrUnix, CWW and everone.

Is the plunge acessorie worth the kit price?

- OldBull

Absolutely

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