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Router Lift Into Sawstop Extension Table

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Forum topic by jayseedub posted 06-17-2021 08:51 PM 501 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jayseedub

208 posts in 3124 days


06-17-2021 08:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router router lift routerlift sawstop saw stop jessem jess-em

I have the Sawstop Contractor Saw (CNS—not the Jobsite one) with the 36” T-glide fence. The 36” fence width comes with a wooden (not cast iron) extension table, and I’d like to insert a router lift in that table.

I really haven’t been able to find anything online where someone has done that. I presume I’d need to make the table top more “beefed up” underneath to make it more rigid—but does anyone have any insight or concerns about that that I should consider?

I’m thinking about the Jess-Em router lift, if that matters—and would probably also build an add-on fence to my Sawstop fence so I could also use it as my router fence….

Thoughts? Fears? Criticisms? I value your insights!


12 replies so far

View darthford's profile

darthford

753 posts in 3082 days


#1 posted 06-17-2021 09:24 PM

I have a wooden extension table on my ICS. IMO I would retrofit an actual router table vs trying to modify that thing.

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jayseedub

208 posts in 3124 days


#2 posted 06-17-2021 09:32 PM

Any substantive reason you wouldn’t suggest modifying what I have already? (Thanks for the thoughts!)

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Fred Hargis

7084 posts in 3652 days


#3 posted 06-18-2021 10:39 AM

The ICS extension (and maybe the others, I dunno) is a lightweight (fewer web pieces that you might normally see) torsion box type of construction. It would be a bit of work to modify it for a router. If I was doing it, I’d start over and make a whole new extension to accommodate the router.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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mrg

884 posts in 4158 days


#4 posted 06-18-2021 11:39 AM

You could beef up the board by cross bracing. Get a Kreg router plate and Triton router and be done. It will weigh less than the router lift. The Triton has the lift mechanism built in and you won’t need to take the router out.

-- mrg

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dbw

570 posts in 2795 days


#5 posted 06-18-2021 12:15 PM

I purchased a SS PCS WITHOUT a fence/extension table. I installed my INCRA TS/LS onto the saw and I purchased the INCRA router table top. The table top comes with support legs and easily bolts up to the cast iron extension wing. I don’t know if it will bolt up to a stamped wing.

FWIW mrg had a good idea:


You could beef up the board by cross bracing. Get a Kreg router plate and Triton router and be done. It will weigh less than the router lift. The Triton has the lift mechanism built in and you won’t need to take the router out.

- mrg


-- Woodworking is like a vicious cycle. The more tools you buy the more you find to buy.

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dbw

570 posts in 2795 days


#6 posted 06-18-2021 01:42 PM

For the record I have a Woodpeckers lift and a PC router motor. Your idea of building an add-on fence for the router is a good one. It will be very useful.

-- Woodworking is like a vicious cycle. The more tools you buy the more you find to buy.

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darthford

753 posts in 3082 days


#7 posted 06-18-2021 07:49 PM



Any substantive reason you wouldn t suggest modifying what I have already? (Thanks for the thoughts!)

- jayseedub

Yes the high gloss rail surface is slippery and the side surface of the table is slippery with only a pinch from a few bolts to keep it in place. I do not have a lot of confidence in that table staying put but suffices for its intended purpose. But for a router table this slippery issue would need to be dealt with. A few well placed pieces of adhesive back sandpaper on the rails so that it bites into the table side would suffice I guess.

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TomM

22 posts in 4571 days


#8 posted 06-18-2021 09:37 PM

I have a PCS with 36” Tglide, and I converted the wood extension table. It’s lightweight mdf so I beefed up the inderside with 3/4 ply and hardwood crossbracing (all the lettered pieces) to support the Jessem lift with 1617 motor. It has only been in use for a month and a few drawerfronts but so far I am really pleased. Also pictured is Ver1.0 of the router fence that that just clamps to the TGlide fence. Some type of micro-adjust will be nice in Ver 2.0.

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jayseedub

208 posts in 3124 days


#9 posted 06-18-2021 10:33 PM

You are THE MAN, @TomM! Thank you for that, and for the pictures, too—exactly what I was considering. Micro-adjusting the fence is also something I’d never considered, so that’s a big help, too!

(Looks like you also have a fold-down outfeed table—is that right? More Pictures?)

Thank you!

View rcs47's profile

rcs47

227 posts in 4288 days


#10 posted 06-18-2021 11:08 PM

Here is what I did to my SS contractors saw.

Instead of trying to cut into the plastic extension top, I decided to pick up a piece of phenolic faced plywood. I used 8/4 oak for the front edge. This allowed me to cut a rabbet into piece to support the top, dovetail new support legs that will allow the cabinet to roll out, and insert a track. I did glue an additional layer where I thought I’d add a track in the table, but you will see there still is one track.

I made the decision to go with a Triton 2.25 HP plunge router, and Woodpecker 7518 plate.

I imitially built a shelf that attached to the saw frame and extended under the 36” extension. I use the same attachment to the frame to attach to rolling cabinet. The saw does not support any weight from the cabinet. It just pushes/pulls it around.

-- Doug - As my Dad taught me, you're not a cabinet maker until you can hide your mistakes.

View TomM's profile

TomM

22 posts in 4571 days


#11 posted 06-18-2021 11:35 PM


You are THE MAN, @TomM! Thank you for that, and for the pictures, too—exactly what I was considering. Micro-adjusting the fence is also something I d never considered, so that s a big help, too!

(Looks like you also have a fold-down outfeed table—is that right? More Pictures?)

Thank you!

- jayseedub

Thank you!. The router table underside bracing: The big pieces C,A,D are there because the miter slot is dado’d into the top side and only leaving about 1/4” of mdf under it. Notice the notch cutouts in C and D on the outer side- so NOT to cover up the holes that attach the support legs. It was an “oh-ooh” moment where I was lucky the glue did not dry yet.

The outfeed table is a quick and dirty 24”x24” attached with door hinges to the real rail. You’ll have to experiment with table shim height and offset gap so that when you raise the table it is just a hair lower than flush with the cast iron top. Support is just a measured 2×2 that says SAW TABLE with a Sharpie.


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bigJohninvegas

1063 posts in 2620 days


#12 posted 06-19-2021 11:29 PM



You are THE MAN, @TomM! Thank you for that, and for the pictures, too—exactly what I was considering. Micro-adjusting the fence is also something I d never considered, so that s a big help, too!

(Looks like you also have a fold-down outfeed table—is that right? More Pictures?)

Thank you!

- jayseedub

Tom did almost exactly what I had originally done.
I don’t have a SS saw, but when I added a Biesemeyer Fence I beefed up the torsion box much like tom’s to accept my Woodpecker router lift. For me it turned out to be a bad location. But the fit in the saw was solid.
Because of how my saw is set up in my shop. the lift was hard to use. I have since relocated my woodpecker lift into a SS cast iron router wing, to the left of my blade. But if my shop was larger. And my saw not up against a wall on the right side. I would still be using it in that location today.
Once the table was made. I used to double sided tape and some scrap ply wood to make a jig to cut out the hole for the lift.

Set the router lift in, and stuck the ply wood around it.

Block of wood in the center keeps the router from tipping.

Hogged out the table top to the proper depth for the lift.

And Jig sawed out the leftovers.

All done. I knew I was not going to stand at the right end of the table. so I set it in farther toward center. Notice the next photo where the lift is in the cast iron wing. How close to the edge the lift is. Much better set up.
When I used my router mounted on the right. I stood at it like I was using the table saw. Was good when doing work where I did not need a fence. When I needed the fence, it was a real pain.

Router lifts location today.

Good luck.

-- John

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