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Is this a normal resaw result?

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Forum topic by PLShutterbug posted 06-14-2021 02:16 PM 742 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PLShutterbug

86 posts in 157 days


06-14-2021 02:16 PM

Just finished setting up my new Harvey 14” bandsaw. As I built the cabinet to go between the mobile base and the saw, I used the bandsaw to resaw a piece of dunnage I had in my shed to use as the front cross-member in the case.

My old bandsaw is a Craftsman 10” with a 3/8”, 7tpi blade without an aggressive kerf. My new saw came with a 3/4”, 4tpi blade with what seems to me to be a relatively aggressive kerf. Here is a picture.

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The older saw shows a bit of washboarding, but this new blade shows a LOT:

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Is this characteristic from a blade of those specs? Or is this a lousy blade?

Since I’m new to the whole sophisticated-bandsawery thing I don’t know. Just looking for information.

One more thing: as I set the square to shoot the first picture above I noticed I have some work to do to get the blade perpendicular to the table. It’s off by probably 1/8” over the six-inch square height. Could that be a factor?

Thanks.

-- Washington (the other WA - the state)


17 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2955 posts in 1742 days


#1 posted 06-14-2021 03:24 PM

Try a new blade. Factory blades on most gear is just a placeholder so you can use the tool until you get a “real” blade.

Normally I order blades/belts, etc. when I order the tool.

Your table looks skewed a bit.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View DS's profile

DS

3850 posts in 3574 days


#2 posted 06-14-2021 03:33 PM

When we are trying to make a rustic piece we will resaw planks to get this look.
We purposefully bent a single tooth on the bandsaw blade to get the deeper grooves.

Maybe look for damage on the blade?
Or, maybe the set of the teeth is exaggerated?

Or, get into rustic furniture making, lol.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Ruscal

107 posts in 332 days


#3 posted 06-14-2021 03:37 PM

I think your setup is off to get that rough of a cut. Google “alex snodgrass bandsaw clinic” and follow his instructions. Table, fence, blade, guides need to be perfectly aligned if you want smooth resaws. If you get your setup dialed in and still have bad results maybe the blade needs looked at.

-- Have a hobby? You should have a business.

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Lazyman

7385 posts in 2541 days


#4 posted 06-14-2021 03:41 PM

Fairly standard for cheap blade in softwood. Highland Woodworking’s Wood slicer resaw blade give you an incredibly smooth resaw. It is relatively inexpensive to buy. My only beef is that it dulls relatively quickly. Even dull it cuts better than above but will start to burn pretty badly in hard woods. I usually wait for them to have a free shipping promotiomn unless I am ordering enough to get free shipping anyway.

Note that the wood slicer is not for green wood.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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PLShutterbug

86 posts in 157 days


#5 posted 06-14-2021 04:27 PM



Try a new blade. Factory blades on most gear is just a placeholder so you can use the tool until you get a “real” blade.

Normally I order blades/belts, etc. when I order the tool.


Thanks.

Your table looks skewed a bit.

That’s why I added the comment that I need to work on perpendicularity.

-- Washington (the other WA - the state)

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PLShutterbug

86 posts in 157 days


#6 posted 06-14-2021 04:35 PM

Thanks all. I will look at the videos, and I acknowledge I need to dial in the saw. For this project the roughness didn’t matter since it is hidden but no – generally I’m not looking for that “rustic” look.

-- Washington (the other WA - the state)

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1490 posts in 1057 days


#7 posted 06-14-2021 06:13 PM

Your question asked us to evaluate your new bandsaw & blade based on a photo of the wood, but you didn’t tell us anything about the wood except that it was a piece of dunnage. What is the wood? Have your tried another? A piece of rock or metal could have damaged a tooth at the first touch.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

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PLShutterbug

86 posts in 157 days


#8 posted 06-14-2021 06:47 PM



Your question asked us to evaluate your new bandsaw & blade based on a photo of the wood, but you didn t tell us anything about the wood except that it was a piece of dunnage. What is the wood? Have your tried another? A piece of rock or metal could have damaged a tooth at the first touch.

- Phil32

Good point. I don’t know other than it was softwood.

The replies I got do give me a basis to look further.

-- Washington (the other WA - the state)

View AGolden's profile

AGolden

130 posts in 488 days


#9 posted 06-14-2021 11:55 PM

Lazyman and Ruscal both said what I would have. That Alex Snodgrass video is pretty helpful and I would definitely recommend trying out one of the woodslicer resaw blades.

I had almost the same thing happen to me a while ago…actually it was REALLY similar to what you are experiencing. I had a new (to me) 14” bandsaw, I was using the 3/4” blade that came with it, and I was having trouble getting it to cut through the piece and when I opened it up it looked just like yours (mine was even a little burnt looking)

What I found out was that the 3/4” blade was just a little too much for my saw, i replaced it with a woodslicer and tuned it up a little based on that video and it solved my problem.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1787 posts in 3741 days


#10 posted 06-15-2021 01:50 AM

A new blade or a planer will correct the problem.

View pottz's profile

pottz

18610 posts in 2138 days


#11 posted 06-15-2021 01:58 AM

you should be able to get it better but when i resaw i really dont care because it’s gonna get planed anyway,im not lookin for sandpaper smooth.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2955 posts in 1742 days


#12 posted 06-15-2021 02:27 AM

Doesn’t having to plane after bandsawing defeat the purpose of the resaw? I thought the whole point of the bandsaw was the narrow (1/16”) kerf. If you have to plane another 1/16” off to get smooth faces then effectively the combined kerf and ripple yield less than my 3/32” TK blade.

I have a TK blade on my saw that leaves an almost perfect face even when cutting in from both edges. At most I have a very thin ridge that sands out without planing. I can get three full 1/4” pieces out of a 15/16” S2S board.

Or am I missing something?

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Sark

417 posts in 1514 days


#13 posted 06-15-2021 02:53 AM

I just had the same problem, and posted on the forum about it. Tune-up plus a different blade solved the problem.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1299 posts in 3653 days


#14 posted 06-15-2021 10:22 AM

“Doesn’t having to plane after bandsawing defeat the purpose of the resaw?”
Have a look at the end of this blog:
https://paulsellers.com/2021/06/prepping-wood-vii/

Obviously a shop bandsaw should give better results than the sawmill bandsaw but not completely eliminate planing (smoother hand plane).

An interesting video about drift elimination:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNdrkmx6ehI

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7385 posts in 2541 days


#15 posted 06-15-2021 01:22 PM

In my experience, if the blade is sharp, I get no drift and as long as the result is flat (no bowing or drift and the cut is square), I would never have to plane off as much as a 1/16th to smooth it. The most would be just slightly more than the tooth set on one side which is almost zero with a sharp HW Wood Slicer so sanding is usually all that is needed.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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