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which saw blade for a circular saw for crosscutting

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Forum topic by KCOlsen posted 06-12-2021 01:20 AM 892 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KCOlsen

18 posts in 304 days


06-12-2021 01:20 AM

am making a cedar coffee table with a waterfall edge which requires me to cut to 45 on a 2 inch thick live edge slab of rec cedar. im using a dewalt 7 1/4 circular saw with a kreig sled system. I would assume a 60 tooth atb blade would do it ok but my friend says a 40 tooth would be better. I would like a splinter free cut but also would like to use the blade later for crosscutting plywood etc. I am confused with hook angle atb high atb reg kerf thin kerf etc. any help would be appreciated


11 replies so far

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SMP

4437 posts in 1064 days


#1 posted 06-12-2021 06:02 AM

I recently bought a Freud 60t blade for mine at HD for $20 to cut a large butcher block countertop and cut perfectly, i just had to sand with 220 and it was ready to finish.

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Madmark2

2958 posts in 1747 days


#2 posted 06-12-2021 11:16 AM

Full 2” thick stock cut at 45° needs 2” x sqr(2) ~ 2.9” of blade exposure — about the 3” max on a 10” TS.

Ain’t gonna work. 7-1/4” saw isn’t going to cut almost 3” depth with ANY blade. Its simply physically impossible.

Set you circ saw to max depth & measure. Now set to 45° at max depth. Set saw on your stock. Notice how blade won’t cut thru the full thickness.

You need a bigger/better saw to make that cut.

Also, circ saw is about the worst tool to make a cut with the level of precision you’ll need for a clean, straight, tight fitting, 45° angle on a coffee table sized slab.

Its actually a double bevel since you have to recut the offcut.

Rethink your plan or find someone with bigger & better tools.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Madmark2

2958 posts in 1747 days


#3 posted 06-13-2021 03:45 AM

Just checked the specs on a DeWalt 7-1/4” circ saw. Max depth of cut at 90° is 2-9/16”. At 45° depth of cut is only 1-13/16”. If its finished “two by” stock (1-1/2” thick) it’ll just cut thru. But if your slab is rough (full 2”) then you’re SOL.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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therealSteveN

8215 posts in 1733 days


#4 posted 06-13-2021 06:22 AM



Just checked the specs on a DeWalt 7-1/4” circ saw. Max depth of cut at 90° is 2-9/16”. At 45° depth of cut is only 1-13/16”. If its finished “two by” stock (1-1/2” thick) it ll just cut thru. But if your slab is rough (full 2”) then you re SOL.

- Madmark2

That’s what it is designed to cut, a 2x piece of stock.

Not being into slab table making I’d say look how they do it to make a waterfall edge table on You tube. Strangely enough what I have seen from them is starting the cut as deep as it would allow with a guided circ saw, or track saw @ 45 degrees. Finishing with a Japanese pull saw. What could possibly go wrong :-0

-- Think safe, be safe

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Jimarco

59 posts in 2266 days


#5 posted 06-13-2021 06:03 PM


Not being into slab table making I d say look how they do it to make a waterfall edge table on You tube. Strangely enough what I have seen from them is starting the cut as deep as it would allow with a guided circ saw, or track saw @ 45 degrees. Finishing with a Japanese pull saw. What could possibly go wrong :-0

- therealSteveN

I have one of those Japanese saws…. I would not do well on this project. However how it looks to the eye after sanding and finished is what counts.

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SMP

4437 posts in 1064 days


#6 posted 06-14-2021 02:44 AM



Not being into slab table making I d say look how they do it to make a waterfall edge table on You tube. Strangely enough what I have seen from them is starting the cut as deep as it would allow with a guided circ saw, or track saw @ 45 degrees. Finishing with a Japanese pull saw. What could possibly go wrong :-0

- therealSteveN

I have one of those Japanese saws…. I would not do well on this project. However how it looks to the eye after sanding and finished is what counts.

- Jimarco

Well, if you are only going to see the top corner it won’t matter. Lets say the top is exactly 2” and you are able to cut exactly 1 13/16 with the circular saw. This means you just have to cut, chew, or gnaw through that last 13/16” sliver with whatever you have at a 45 or even an angle greater than 45. Even if you accidentally cut it less than 45, 5 minutes with a rasp or file would let the joint seat properly.

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KCOlsen

18 posts in 304 days


#7 posted 06-14-2021 05:44 PM

Appreciate all the suggestions the slap is 1 7/8 thick i planned on using a track system to guide the saw i like the idea of the Finishing with a Japanese pull saw suggestion the inside edge would not be that important since it would be under the table. I am not considering the use of my table saw with a sled set up. Another consideration is plane the plank down to 1 3/4

Madmark thanks for the heads-up on the depth of cut i didnt think of that.

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bandit571

29083 posts in 3842 days


#8 posted 06-14-2021 07:06 PM

been thinking…dangerous, I know….but…..complete the cuts on the show side first with the guided circular saw. Next, gently, carefully flip the plank good side down. Maybe add a filler in the kerf. Then set up the guided circular saw to finish the cut….Support for the cut-offs is a requirement. make sure the 2 cuts will line up exactly. You can always clean things up with a hand plane.

That filler in the kerf…provides a bit off support…..it also prevents any binding during the cut.

Support can be a second sawhorse…..with both sections-to-be clamped down to the saw horses. Means you’ll need 4 matching saw horses….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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splintergroup

5444 posts in 2381 days


#9 posted 06-14-2021 07:12 PM

Don’t discount other joints that can offer better strength and fit (although a bit more planning is involved)

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LeeRoyMan

1944 posts in 885 days


#10 posted 06-14-2021 09:55 PM

I would see if I could rent a 10” circular saw from home depot or find one somewhere else.
(Makita makes a descent one. )

I think it would be easier to find the right saw instead of doing multiple steps that may or may not yield descent results.

I would buy and use a new 10” 40 tooth carbide blade. (Tenyru Gold Metal is my fav.)

Another option would be to make a jig that slides over the top.
Then rough it down anyway you can, then clean it up with a router.

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knotscott

8421 posts in 4534 days


#11 posted 06-14-2021 11:24 PM

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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