LumberJocks

new shop layout

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by robertsj22 posted 05-27-2021 11:13 AM 596 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View robertsj22's profile

robertsj22

13 posts in 187 days


05-27-2021 11:13 AM

new to woodworking and am in the finishing stages of completeing my shop. I basically have sealed off an area in my 3 car garage and put up walls insulated and ran electric. I will be getting a bunch of tools from my father in law who passed away. Im wondering if anyone has any tips on how its best to set the shop up.


18 replies so far

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

11362 posts in 3574 days


#1 posted 05-27-2021 12:42 PM

I have everything on wheels, to help me figure out what the best layout is easier… Mine has changed a number of times already.

My biggest advice, don’t be afraid to try rearranging from time to time. You might be surprised how well something works you weren’t expecting to. You’ll have to think about your workflows and what you do, and answer it for yourself. I like having tablesaw outfeed by the jointer and planer, and near the radial arm saw as those four often get used together.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7289 posts in 3775 days


#2 posted 05-27-2021 12:49 PM

Most definitely put everything on wheels. No matter how hard you try to plan things out they will change over time.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View robertsj22's profile

robertsj22

13 posts in 187 days


#3 posted 05-27-2021 12:52 PM

my first issue i ran into is that at least 4 of the tools are 220. so i’m planning to run new lines for that and i wanted to keep them close the machines if possible.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2903 posts in 4204 days


#4 posted 05-27-2021 12:54 PM

I did just what you are planning. In my case the floor was not level and had a, step up, in the concrete on one end. I agree, put your equipment on wheels. I installed a plywood floor and leveled it. I put supports about 12” on center so no matter where I moved equipment the floor would not sag. I assembled all this using screws because I knew that someday I would move and could take it all apart. I did move ,five years later, and moved that plywood to my new (to me) shop.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View brtech's profile

brtech

1173 posts in 4204 days


#5 posted 05-27-2021 01:08 PM

Not to belabor the basics, but the table saw is the heart of your shop. Unless you have a track saw, you probably want to make sure you have clearance to handle a 4×8 sheet of ply. That usually means some kind of table behind the table saw, which can do double duty as a bench and or assembly table.

Bench – you need a bench. If you aren’t getting one, build one. Lots of plans and ideas here. It can be up against a wall, but the bench has to be central in your layout.

Dust collection. Especially if you are in a colder climate so opening the garage door won’t be a good option in the winter. Lots and lots of opinions, data, and ideas here also. You want to plan where the DC goes, and how you will pipe it to the tools.

Lighting. Use lots and lots. Noobs often underestimate how much they need by a factor of 2. I have a HO fluorescent or LED every 3’ in mine.

Air: useful but not essential, and planning where the compressor goes and how airlines go is a good idea. Sounds like it’s too late, but you can use flex airline in walls and routed like electric.

Storage. Wood storage, tool storage, clamp storage (if you haven’t heard it yet, let me be the first to introduce you to the observation that you can never have too many clamps), blades, bits, hardware, and lots and lots of other things need a place to go.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7289 posts in 3775 days


#6 posted 05-27-2021 01:17 PM



my first issue i ran into is that at least 4 of the tools are 220. so i m planning to run new lines for that and i wanted to keep them close the machines if possible.

- robertsj22


Consider putting outlets in the ceiling, then have drop cords to tools in the center of the room. Should you choose to do this, it’s best to have locking receptacles, and maybe some kind of strain relief.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

1015 posts in 1484 days


#7 posted 05-27-2021 01:18 PM

Storage. Wood storage, tool storage, clamp storage (if you haven’t heard it yet, let me be the first to introduce you to the observation that you can never have too many clamps), blades, bits, hardware, and lots and lots of other things need a place to go.

boy howdy, no truer words written,
good luck with layout, the holy grail of wood workers ’’where do i put this’‘
Rj in az

-- Living the dream

View stevejack's profile

stevejack

354 posts in 602 days


#8 posted 05-27-2021 01:51 PM

I was lucky enough to finish out an unfinished 1 car garage which just a week ago I sheeted in the carport so now its a 2 car shop. I had at least 4 quad outlets along the long walls say every 5-6 feet on 2 separate circuits AND THIS IS important I put then at about 36-40 inches from the floor.

Since I expanded I literally gave half of that space to the table saw. AND of Course everything I have is on casters. I also learned DONT CHEAP OUT on the casters. If you buy like the cheap 2 inch ones might as well have not put any on…

Here is one thing I never hear anyone talk about. PAINT EVERYTHING you can Bright WHITE. It will increase your lighting huge without even having to add any more lighting. IN fact I think I will paint my concrete floor white next month.

AND If you can afford it Light the place with LEDS every change you can. I got these 8 foot long BRIGHT as hell Linkable Low Profile LEDS And I only used 6 Going to replace the rest of the damn 4foot long Walmart Shop lights with another order. AND they hardly take up any head room Maybe an inch. Set of 8 $150.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

11362 posts in 3574 days


#9 posted 05-27-2021 02:20 PM

I like my wood walls, more cozy and inviting to me, and I enjoy being in there more than a white room. The end goal is to fill all wall space with tools and storage anyway right? :-P

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View stevejack's profile

stevejack

354 posts in 602 days


#10 posted 05-27-2021 02:26 PM

When I did my expansion I was thinking of maybe some sort of wood panels on the walls. I would need 11 sheet s to finish out my area. The very cheapest PANEL I could find was over $45… SO Dry wall it was!....


I like my wood walls, more cozy and inviting to me, and I enjoy being in there more than a white room. The end goal is to fill all walls pace with tools and storage anyway right? :-P

- Mosquito


View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

11362 posts in 3574 days


#11 posted 05-27-2021 03:21 PM



When I did my expansion I was thinking of maybe some sort of wood panels on the walls. I would need 11 sheet s to finish out my area. The very cheapest PANEL I could find was over $45… SO Dry wall it was!....

- stevejack

For sure lol I’m glad I finished mine with 1/2” sanded BCX a few years back before things went nuts…. Should be noted, mine is free-standing so I didn’t have to worry about fire break or anything like that.

And to be fair, I was originally planning to paint it, but before I did I decided I liked it the way it was, so I left it (plus the idea of painting a shop vs moving in was pretty easy). The ceiling panels were a different manufacturer, and a lot more white in color than the walls, so that sort of worked out. And to your point, I did end up using more lights than I originally thought I would. Used 20 4’ LED strip/tube lights instead of the 16 I thought I would originally, so if more lumen output for fewer lights is your goal, definitely paint everything white (and gloss). Not disputing whether or not it works, just a sacrifice I was willing to make for my own preference and enjoyment being in the space

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3046 posts in 883 days


#12 posted 05-27-2021 04:09 PM

I am with you mos, I like the wood look. It just make it feel like a shop to me.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

1015 posts in 1484 days


#13 posted 05-27-2021 08:14 PM

my new to me shop is about 980 actual usable floor space, with an overhead door to allow access with the big stuff,
all my biggies are on wheels, but with the new sliding table saw, i intend to back to back it with my old uni saw, and surround it with the planer, jointer and other sundry machines, the other smaller units are already on flip carts, so i can motor outside on the 12×36 patio to do the deed. Even though i have laid it out in real time on the floor in chalk, i still struggle with a ””FLOW”, so i’m expecting to do some moving, the dust collection system will be in an outer addition along with the air compressor, to mitigate the noise, while i’m dang near deaf still trying to save some of it.
once i get it close i’ll do some pics and have one of my daughters do the pictures, i am not a computer guy, and as noted dont’ do pics, hehe,

i figure i’ll be moving things for a while till i get the ’’zen’’ flow, or something like that
rj in az

-- Living the dream

View metolius's profile

metolius

432 posts in 2012 days


#14 posted 05-27-2021 11:43 PM



i figure i ll be moving things for a while till i get the zen flow, or something like that
rj in az

- Knockonit

I think this is a good train to advice. Thinking about how you work and what would be better while you’re doing things, brings change. It takes time. What causes you to walk back and forth from one side of the shop to the other. What machines need better dust control, or power management. Is there a tool you would like to use, but don’t because its too much effort to set it up. What is difficult that could be easier. Do you know where everything is … everything should have a place.

-- derek / oregon

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

395 posts in 3276 days


#15 posted 05-28-2021 03:00 AM

You’ve been given great advice above. Here’s my 2 cents.
Make little cutouts of each of your tools and lay them out on paper to scale. Imagine doing a project and go through the motions in your imagination to get a sense of your workflow. The less running around the better. Store things where you will use them. Install more electric outlets than you will need and in more locations. It’s cheap at this point. Look at the photos of shops on Lumberjocks then also look at photos on Pinterest and Google for images of shops and shop storage for more ideas. Fine Woodworking has had a number of articles over the years on shop layout for various size shops. Most of all remember that there is no right answer. Only what works for you.
Best of luck.

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com