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Forum topic by Winny94 posted 05-19-2021 01:49 AM 450 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Winny94

75 posts in 1559 days


05-19-2021 01:49 AM

Getting tired of sandpaper on granite so looking to get a couple stones.

Im think diamond stones for the bulk sharpening and a water stone for the finish. Anyone who already traveled this road want to give any advice? Best places to buy? MFGs to focus on? If it matters, I use the Veritas MkII guide.


19 replies so far

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SMP

4149 posts in 1023 days


#1 posted 05-19-2021 02:24 AM

Well, what’s your budget?

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sansoo22

1673 posts in 772 days


#2 posted 05-19-2021 02:45 AM

Currently I’m using DMT diamond stones and Shapton ceramic whetstones. I buy my DMT stones direct from DMT. I tried buying them off Amazon at a significant cost savings and got boned. One showed up rippled and I got a refund but another delaminated after a few months outside any return window. I replaced both direct from DMT and haven’t had an issue yet.

But like SMP alluded to your budget can change what brands to look at.

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Rich

6929 posts in 1707 days


#3 posted 05-19-2021 04:16 AM


Well, what’s your budget?

- SMP

+1

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Winny94

75 posts in 1559 days


#4 posted 05-19-2021 04:51 AM



Well, what’s your budget?

- SMP


I suppose that answer is “depends”. Typically I try to buy right before the point of deminishing return. I’m hoping I can make due with 2 stones, 2 different abrasions on each and hopefully those are about $75/ea. Maybe I’m way off base and that only buys me garbage and I need to reevaluate?

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metolius

430 posts in 1848 days


#5 posted 05-19-2021 05:09 AM

the amzn pricing of my goto kit

a diamond plate – 116
a decent shapton – 67
a strop – 9

Until I tried it, I thought the diamond plate to splash/go ceramic thing was going to pass as a fad.

-- derek / oregon

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Andre

4574 posts in 2924 days


#6 posted 05-19-2021 05:40 AM


Well, what’s your budget?

- SMP

I suppose that answer is “depends”. Typically I try to buy right before the point of deminishing return. I m hoping I can make due with 2 stones, 2 different abrasions on each and hopefully those are about $75/ea. Maybe I m way off base and that only buys me garbage and I need to reevaluate?

- Winny94

Norton 1000/8000 combo and a pride flatten stone, some green compound an a flat board for touch up’s!
LOL! I have tried every thing and other than Arkansas oil stone nothing compares:) (with a strop to polish)
The Norton stone will, should be enough to take you to the point of ignoring the MII and going free hand!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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DevinT

1158 posts in 84 days


#7 posted 05-19-2021 02:09 PM

I use a Trend diamond plate with 300 grit on one side and 1000 the other. I use the 300 grit side for fast removal such as wen I need to remove a camber, take out a large pit on the edge, or re-straighten a skewed bevel. I also use the 300 grit side for flattening my Shapton 16k. I use the 1000 grit side of the Trend to prepare my secondary bevels and back bevels, and I use the Shapton 16k to polish, set a tertiary (micro) bevel, and remove burrs.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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Rich

6929 posts in 1707 days


#8 posted 05-19-2021 02:56 PM

Good tip above to look at combination stones. Woodcraft is now carrying Pride Abrasives combo stones. You can pick up a 220/1000 and a 3000/8000 for less than your $150 budget.

For final polishing 3M 0.3 micron lapping film (~18000 grit) and float glass will be far less expensive than a 16,000 grit stone.

You’ll also need a flattening stone. Regular flattening stones need to be flattened themselves, so I avoid that route. A coarse diamond plate will do a better job, but to stay within your budget, some 120 grit wet or dry paper and the float glass above will do a good job too.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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KelleyCrafts

4580 posts in 1857 days


#9 posted 05-19-2021 03:21 PM



I use a Trend diamond plate with 300 grit on one side and 1000 the other. I use the 300 grit side for fast removal such as wen I need to remove a camber, take out a large pit on the edge, or re-straighten a skewed bevel. I also use the 300 grit side for flattening my Shapton 16k. I use the 1000 grit side of the Trend to prepare my secondary bevels and back bevels, and I use the Shapton 16k to polish, set a tertiary (micro) bevel, and remove burrs.

- DevinT

This. I do the same except I have a 1000 shapton and 16000. No strop needed, never had sharper blades. The advantage to what Devin has is the 300/1000 trend you can use the 300 side to flatten your ceramic stone. Definitely not a bad option. I have another plate I use to flatten the ceramics.

Water stones are horrible. If you have to soak it you just won’t sharpen as often as you should. It’s messier and a pain. I’ve been down that road.

-- Dave - http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

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DevinT

1158 posts in 84 days


#10 posted 05-19-2021 03:33 PM

Oh, and another tip. I have used Hone Rite Gold additive to water to keep from corroding my Trend plate and blades, but honestly Windex works well and is cheap and the spray bottle is pretty decent.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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MPython

364 posts in 930 days


#11 posted 05-19-2021 04:43 PM

Winny, I would offer these thoughts on your search for a new sharpening method. I have tried just about all the current sharpening options and I’ve learned that they all work. Some are faster than others, some are messier than others and some are more complicated than others, but they all work. My recommendation is that when you decide on a regimen to try, and stick with it until you master it. Avoid jumping around from one to another looking for sharpening Nirvana. Every sharpening medium has a learning curve that you have to complete to achieve consistent, sharp edges. Jumping from one to another before you master the first one wastes time and costs a lot of money.

KellyCrafts mentioned above that water stones require the extra step of pre-soaking and because that was a “pain,” he didn’t sharpen as often. He’s right, I had the same experience, and to expand his logic, the more complicated your sharpening regimen is, the less often you will use it. Simple is best. After trying oil stones, sandpaper “scary sharp”, Tormek, water stones, and Diamonds, I settled on a Norton Crystolon/India finishing with a translucent Arkansas and a leather strop. The stones are clean, require little or no maintenance and sharpening is a simple three step process. Easy. To be fair, I should mention that my oil stones work well on the traditional O1 steel in many of my chisels and plane irons. They don’t work so great on some of the modern hard, wear-resistant steels like A2 and some of the Japanese laminated steels. I’ve had to add diamonds back to my regimen for these.

I don’t claim my method is “the best,” it’s just what I ended up with. I’m happy with it and I get excellent edges. Everybody has their own favorite method. You need to find what suits you, but shoot for simple and stick with each new method until you master it before trying another.

My $.02.

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DevinT

1158 posts in 84 days


#12 posted 05-19-2021 04:49 PM

+1 for diamonds being able to effectively work laminated blades. My pre-WW2 laminated Stanley blades required several minutes on the diamond stone to restore after initial arrival. I can’t imagine restoring them without diamonds.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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SMP

4149 posts in 1023 days


#13 posted 05-19-2021 05:14 PM

I have tried about everything, trying to save money at first cost me more as I replaced stuff. I won’t give specifics because there are so many valid options, however will leave two tips I found through trial and error:

1. Buy at least 8”x3” stones. Trying to sharpen a 2” iron on a 2” stone sucks, and wider irons are even worse. (And some 2” stones are slightly less than the spec says)

2. Don’t buy the norton 400/1000 waterstone. I bought it because of the price and combo but if you even look at the 400 side it dishes out.

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sansoo22

1673 posts in 772 days


#14 posted 05-19-2021 05:26 PM


2. Don’t buy the norton 400/1000 waterstone. I bought it because of the price and combo but if you even look at the 400 side it dishes out.

- SMP

LOL….i forgot i once had that stone as well and ditched it for the same exact reason

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brtech

1141 posts in 4040 days


#15 posted 05-19-2021 05:27 PM

If you have a restricted budget, the Duosharp diamond plates are an excellent choice: https://smile.amazon.com/DMT-WM8EF-WB-8-Inch-DuoSharp-Bench/dp/B000H6L6FA/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=duosharp&qid=1621444717&sr=8-3

I use that, and then either an 8000 grit waterstone followed by a strop, or 3M lapping sheets on glass.
I keep my waterstone in a plastic container that has some water in it. I replace the water every time I use the stone. That means it’s always ready to go, and after oh, at least 7 years, it seems fine being treated that way.

Agree, you want 8×3, although the Duosharp is 8×2 5/8, and it works just fine on a plane blade.

I use the Norton flattening stone, and it seems to be fine. I’m sure a coarse diamond plate would be better, but every time I’ve checked for flat after using the Norton, it seems as flat as I can see with the tools I have.

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