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Veritas DX60 question

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Forum topic by Ilan posted 05-18-2021 02:57 PM 549 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ilan

18 posts in 1723 days


05-18-2021 02:57 PM

Hi, I got a Veritas DX60 block plane as a gift (with PM-V11 blade). This is my first real hand plane. I tried it and it doesn’t seem to be very sharp coming from the factory so I guess I need to sharpen the blade. The manual says ‘It comes with a two-angle bevel: a 25° primary bevel and a 23° relief bevel to ease resharpening. All that is required is to hone your preferred micro-bevel.’

What does that mean? What angle do I need to sharpen the blade at? any other tips for me?


28 replies so far

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Andre

4577 posts in 2925 days


#1 posted 05-18-2021 03:50 PM

Well if you are like me, flatten the back to a mirror finish, hollow grind the edge then sharpen with a 1000 gr. Water stone then hone/polish with a 8000 gr. Water stone. Blade comes at 25 degrees so angle will not change unless you want it to?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#2 posted 05-18-2021 05:13 PM

What they are saying is that they recommend putting a tertiary bevel on the blade.

On the Lee Valley website the A2 blade shows the primary and secondary quite easily

You need to add a razor thin bevel (a micro-bevel) at the very tip that is 1-2 degrees less than the secondary bevel.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#3 posted 05-18-2021 05:17 PM

Note, that the DX60 block plane is a bevel-up plane. Were this a bevel-down plane, you would do the opposite from shown above. The primary bevel would still be 25 degrees but on a bevel-down system you would increase the bevel at each step. So instead of going from 25 to 23 like in a bevel-up system (above image), you would go 25 to 29 degrees on a bevel-down system. The micro-bevel on the end of a bevel-down system (the tertiary bevel) would be 31-32 degrees, instead of what I recommend for a bevel-up system which would be 21-22.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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Aj2

3891 posts in 2917 days


#4 posted 05-18-2021 05:38 PM

I have a tip send me the plane and no one will get hurt. :)

-- Aj

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Ocelot

3133 posts in 3757 days


#5 posted 05-18-2021 09:54 PM

I don’t see how the secondary bevel can be lower angle than the primary. Seems backwards to me, but I’m tired at this time of day.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#6 posted 05-18-2021 10:03 PM

If you think about it, if you did the reverse, where the primary bevel was steeper than the secondary, then the chip would have to climb up an incline.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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SMP

4156 posts in 1025 days


#7 posted 05-18-2021 11:03 PM

Ummm…not exactly sure what’s going on with math in this thread LOL, but I would just put a 30 degree secondary bevel on it with a fine stone. Its a microbevel so I usually just do it on my 8000 stone.

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Foghorn

1243 posts in 506 days


#8 posted 05-19-2021 12:44 AM

I’m surprised that it isn’t “sharp”. Any Veritas or LN planes I’ve ever bought are definitely sharp with only a quick hone to be ready for use. Maybe the OP is trying to take off too much in one pass? First time plane user. Just guessing here.

-- Darrel

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#9 posted 05-19-2021 01:13 AM

I don’t have a DX60 but I have the apron plane and the wooden plane kit. I will check their blades and instructions. Because the website doesn’t say what the secondary bevel is but 23 sounds wrong. I was just going off what the OP stated the bevels were.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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metolius

430 posts in 1850 days


#10 posted 05-19-2021 02:45 AM

I think the manual’s confusing term here is “relief bevel to ease resharpening”. It may perhaps also termed as a back bevel which is an alternative to a hollow grind for the purpose of getting a majority of the metal out of the way, allowing you to focus sharpening effort on the edge.

In the graphic, what’s noted as the primary 25° is what the manual refers to as the 23° relief bevel. What is noted as secondary, the manual refers to as the 25° primary bevel.

-- derek / oregon

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sansoo22

1676 posts in 774 days


#11 posted 05-19-2021 03:29 AM



Ummm…not exactly sure what’s going on with math in this thread LOL, but I would just put a 30 degree secondary bevel on it with a fine stone. Its a microbevel so I usually just do it on my 8000 stone.

- SMP

+1 not a whole lot to it for me. Bench plane, block plane, and bench chisels all get 25 primary and 30 secondary bevels.

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#12 posted 05-19-2021 02:24 PM

I had a good look at my Veritas apron plane, which also has two bevels on the blade from the factory.

The confusion seems to be around the use of “primary” vs “secondary.”

Rob Cosman and many other folks would call the primary bevel the top-most (and most-prevalent) bevel, the secondary bevel would be below that toward the blade edge, and a tertiary (or micro) bevel would be right on the edge.

However, they are calling the “primary” bevel the angle at the edge and the “secondary” bevel is further back up the blade. This seems wholly backwards to me, and is certainly not how folks like Rob Cosman talk about blades. You will very clearly hear Rob talk about a 25 degree primary, secondary at 29, and tertiary at 31 degrees.

Measuring my apron plane, I can see plane as day that what I (and others like Rob Cosman) would fall the primary angle is at 23 degrees and the secondary (at the edge of the blade) is at 25 degrees.

I would recommend based on that information that you put a 27-29 degree bevel. Others have recommended 30 and that would likely be fine.

The basic gist is “just a few degrees higher than the angle behind it.”

-- Devin, SF, CA

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#13 posted 05-19-2021 02:29 PM

So, there may be some disagreement on what to call each bevel, but I do believe this is the suggestion:

-- Devin, SF, CA

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DevinT

1168 posts in 86 days


#14 posted 05-19-2021 02:33 PM

How to select 27, 28, 29, or 30 degrees for your micro-bevel?

The DX60 has a bed angle of 12 degrees. Whatever you set your micro-bevel to, you’ll have to add 12 degrees to find out the angle of attack. If you hone the micro-bevel to 30 degrees you’re making the DX60 function more like a bench plane by giving it an angle of attack of 42 degrees (traditional bevel-down bench plane will present the blade at 45 degrees).

However, the DX60 is a low-angle block plane. I would actually go closer to 27 degrees which would present the blade at a combined 39 degrees, giving you more of a slicing action than the 42 combined degrees recommended by others saying to use a 30 degree micro-bevel.

-- Devin, SF, CA

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HokieKen

17925 posts in 2258 days


#15 posted 05-19-2021 02:37 PM

IMO, it depends largely on your sharpening routine. The use of secondary and tertiary bevels is primarily to reduce the amount of metal that needs to be removed and therefore the amount of time required to sharpen. I use a power sharpener though and find it much simplifies my life to have one bevel on everything. I may, on occasion, add a secondary bevel to a blade to modify it’s angle of attack but otherwise, I skip them.

Another advantage of using a single bevel is that for hand sharpening, it gives a bigger surface to rest on the stone. For experience folks, that isn’t a big deal. But for someone less experienced, it may take longer but may also be helpful in maintaining a consistent edge.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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