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What type of wood is this?

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Forum topic by ArmyOfNobunaga posted 05-18-2021 12:02 PM 404 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 37 days


05-18-2021 12:02 PM

Hi guys,

I’ve been reading here for a while and joined in order to ask questions to learn more.

We buy wood from Austria that is reclaimed from homes. I have had a hard time figuring out what species some of it is.

This is one of the types. I don’t want to type my guess as it may cloud someone’s judgement.

It’s hard as heck and very heavy. Will also dull a brand new resaw blade after about 80 foot of cuts.

Thanks for any help everyone!


15 replies so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1838 posts in 846 days


#1 posted 05-18-2021 01:22 PM

Petrified Ash?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3890 posts in 2917 days


#2 posted 05-18-2021 01:39 PM

The second pic looks like firewood.
The first pic my thought was elm.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

6000 posts in 3470 days


#3 posted 05-18-2021 01:48 PM

Ash or oak, heavily weathered.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1515 posts in 4202 days


#4 posted 05-18-2021 01:48 PM



Petrified Ash?

- LeeRoyMan

Yep…

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View ArmyOfNobunaga's profile

ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 37 days


#5 posted 05-18-2021 02:03 PM

It had a slight orangish tint. So I’ve been calling it wych elm. But it has very slight pith rays and slight quarter saw marks. So slight in not sure if I’m fooling myself or not.

When I have my guys resaw it you will see sparks come from the blade. HARD

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1447 posts in 1022 days


#6 posted 05-18-2021 02:17 PM

Cypress from an old stable or mushroom farm building

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4548 posts in 2613 days


#7 posted 05-18-2021 02:40 PM

Dense Austria hardwoods?

Oak and Ash are most common local ‘hard’ hardwoods.
Color difference between early and late wood, is very similar to Ash species.

If reclaimed wood is from country homes, could be from trees harvested from local land. There are some small amounts of Eucalyptus species like mountain ash, and white gum in warmer valley areas; which could be remote candidates too.

Too much weather damage on pieces in pics to clearly see end grain.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View ArmyOfNobunaga's profile

ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 37 days


#8 posted 05-18-2021 10:21 PM

Thanks guys. I didn’t think of ash. It holds a stain very very well and will move if we leave it out in a Houston storm , so I don’t think it’s petrified. But maybe I need to research that. I have a whole passel of wood pics I’d like to toss at y’all to see if uou have any ideas.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8009 posts in 1693 days


#9 posted 05-18-2021 11:28 PM

Looks really weathered to me. Weathered is an early stage of petrification. (A process of fossilization in which dissolved minerals replace organic matter)

I don’t think it looks like any petrified anything I have seen. Cutting that stuff you want a wet saw, and a good mask/respirator. The dust can cause silicosis.

Sparks from a saw blade on contracting wood aren’t that rare actually. If you saw in the dark, and film you will see it quiet a lot. Unless heavily controlled I don’t suggest anyone doing that.

To get a real accurate answer you would first need more info, specifically a real date figure for how old a reclaimed house is? In the US we think of a house being really old when it’s 200 years old. In Europe that well may be the average of “newer” homes. So you are probably looking at something local to where the house was because they didn’t have shipping, and BORGs like we do now, so a Farmer building houses didn’t want to haul wood 3 miles, he wanted the horse to drag it 50 feet.

I’m going to guess it’s not a species that is really that hard. What it is, is hardened by age, and cycle after cycle of heating, and cooling. Many people in parts of the US have gotten into pine, spruce, and fir in a 40 year old home, and sworn it was as hard as a diamond. Couldn’t cut it, weighed a ton, and no way could you pull the nails in it out. All descriptions of pine I have seen that only came out of a pre war home.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2841 posts in 1707 days


#10 posted 05-18-2021 11:28 PM

It looks like it was submerged for a time. Have you checked the moisture content? It may be heavy because it is waterlogged. Crosscut a piece and check the internal moisture content.

As for dulling blades, I’ll bet there is a lot of embedded silica (sand) in it. It’ll rapidly destroy HSS saw, planer and jointer blades making the salvage costs significantly higher.

Sanr is source of sparks. Hold sawn piece in strong light and tilt back and forth. You should see shiny specks of silica.

The rings are widely spaced suggesting fast growth. Truth be told, it looks like weathered Austrian pine or fir to me.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1838 posts in 846 days


#11 posted 05-18-2021 11:35 PM

To clarify…..”Petrified” was a joke because it looks so old

White Ash end grain pic.

View ArmyOfNobunaga's profile

ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 37 days


#12 posted 05-18-2021 11:43 PM



To clarify…..”Petrified” was a joke because it looks so old

White Ash end grain pic.

- LeeRoyMan


Nice. That looks like it! Does ash have any minuscule pith rays? That is what has thrown me on this wood. They are faint pith like rays. I sanded one and stained it today just to make the rays pop if you would like a picture

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1515 posts in 4202 days


#13 posted 05-19-2021 12:07 AM



Does ash have any minuscule pith rays? That is what has thrown me on this wood. They are faint pith like rays. I sanded one and stained it today just to make the rays pop if you would like a picture

- ArmyOfNobunaga

If they actually are visible medullary rays, that might eliminate Ash. All wood has medullary rays, but most aren’t visible to the naked eye. I’ve never seen Ash with visible rays and I can’t find any pics either.
Definitley post more pictures.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Jim2020's profile

Jim2020

89 posts in 357 days


#14 posted 05-19-2021 12:15 AM

It looks just like pressure treated pine people use for their docks. I have boards like that wash up on my sea wall all the time. Long exposure to the sun, then long time floating around the lake til it washes up. Don’t think pressure treated pine that’s weathered like that is that hard, or difficult to machine, though. Jim

View ArmyOfNobunaga's profile

ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 37 days


#15 posted 05-19-2021 01:28 AM


Does ash have any minuscule pith rays? That is what has thrown me on this wood. They are faint pith like rays. I sanded one and stained it today just to make the rays pop if you would like a picture

- ArmyOfNobunaga

If they actually are visible medullary rays, that might eliminate Ash. All wood has medullary rays, but most aren t visible to the naked eye. I ve never seen Ash with visible rays and I can t find any pics either.
Definitley post more pictures.

- Tony_S

Hey Tony, that was another one of my questions on medullary rays. Thank you!!!!

I’ll gather up some more pictures and post them. I know this is a tough ask as it’s European…. I can Id many American woods in seconds but these 200-300 European boards are very tough for me.

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