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need help hanging floating nightstands

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Forum topic by Carol posted 05-18-2021 02:51 AM 331 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carol

137 posts in 1636 days


05-18-2021 02:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood nightstand floating

i’ve made the first of 2 simple floating nightstands, but just can’t seem to figure out how to hang them.

there’s only 1 stud available, and it’s about 1/3 of the way across the back. i’ve thought about using a traditional french cleat, but again – there’s only 1 stud.

then i thought about a hangman hangar, but again…

thought about mounting them in the corner, spanning both walls, but they’re not wide enough. with the size they are now, there would be too big a gap between the bed and the table.

they need to float or their legs will prevent a large drawer under the head of the bed from opening.

i’m at a loss…

-- Carol


12 replies so far

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SMP

4198 posts in 1029 days


#1 posted 05-18-2021 02:57 AM

Is there a back on it? Mike Pekovich’s made a pretty ingenious back for the hanging tool chest I made. You basically cut the back out of 1/2” ply to fit into rabbets on the sides. Then you rip the back horizontally with your table saw angled(forget the angle he said). You then screw the upper section to the cabinet, and screw the lower section to the wall and then it slides over and locks in like a French cleat. A couple 3” screws into a stud and some of the heavy duty wall hangers and that thing is on there.

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1thumb

445 posts in 3280 days


#2 posted 05-18-2021 03:02 AM

See LeeRoyMan’s comment. Small nightstand, you’ll be fine

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Craftsman on the lake

3866 posts in 4561 days


#3 posted 05-18-2021 03:13 AM

I don’t know what your situation is…. Are they fairly close to each side of the bed and is there a wood bead head? If so, What I’ve done in one instance in the past was to run straps of wood, 3/4” plywood is good, out from the side back of the bed head then screw the stands to that. Literally the bead head and night stands are one unit. You can also screw them a couple of inches without much showing too so they’re not too close to the bed.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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LeeRoyMan

1863 posts in 850 days


#4 posted 05-18-2021 03:21 AM

Does your cabinet have a full back, if so how thick?

With at least 1/2” back, you should be able to screw into the stud you have.
Put one up towards the top, and one in the drawer section, towards the bottom.
Your cabinet is small enough that this will hold.
You could also add a couple of corkscrew anchors on the other side of the cabinet, into the sheetrock, just to pull the other side of the cabinet tight to the wall.

The main thing is that your back is secured strong enough to the cabinet to carry the weight of the cabinet.

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metolius

430 posts in 1854 days


#5 posted 05-18-2021 03:48 AM

My thoughts are on the french cleat to reduce risk of twist, supplementing the single stud attachment with a toggle bolt or two.

-- derek / oregon

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DevinT

1232 posts in 90 days


#6 posted 05-18-2021 04:47 PM

Ever heard of Gee Fix?

-- Devin, SF, CA

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controlfreak

2274 posts in 725 days


#7 posted 05-18-2021 05:37 PM



My thoughts are on the french cleat to reduce risk of twist, supplementing the single stud attachment with a toggle bolt or two.

- metolius


+1 If you can make the cleat wide enough to receive two screws in the stud the toggles will keep it from twisting. Of course this means you will need a recessed back on the stand or will need to add some strips of wood to the back and sides to equal the depth of the cleat. You may also want to place at an awkward height to discourage someone from sitting on it.

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pottz

17668 posts in 2107 days


#8 posted 05-18-2021 06:14 PM

My thoughts are on the french cleat to reduce risk of twist, supplementing the single stud attachment with a toggle bolt or two.

- metolius

+1 If you can make the cleat wide enough to receive two screws in the stud the toggles will keep it from twisting. Of course this means you will need a recessed back on the stand or will need to add some strips of wood to the back and sides to equal the depth of the cleat. You may also want to place at an awkward height to discourage someone from sitting on it.

- controlfreak


+1 this is what i did,i made the french cleat about a foot wide so i could get two screw inrto the stud,works great.night stand is only about 20lbs.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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ArmyOfNobunaga

18 posts in 41 days


#9 posted 05-18-2021 07:33 PM

I would just cut the drywall with a dremel oscillating drywall cutter and span both sides of the 2×4 with more wood.

I know it sounds extreme but it takes me about 20 minutes to do one and spackle and repaint.

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DevinT

1232 posts in 90 days


#10 posted 05-18-2021 08:07 PM

Clearly nobody has heard of Gee Fix. Can hold 250+ lbs on one bolt … in dry wall. I used 6 of them to hang a heavy duty bracket in dry wall above a door frame as well as in a ceiling. Both are strong enough that you can hang off of. If you have studs, great, but when you don’t, there’s always Gee Fix

A few videos demonstrating Gee Fix:

GeeFix vs Gripit - strength test - which is best?

The Strongest Plasterboard Fixing Ever!

How to install GeeFix: The Ultimate Drywall, Plasterboard, Cavity Wall Anchor

Except, I make some modifications to their system. I throw the nylon cord away and use guitar cable (if you watch the last video above you’ll understand). The nylon cord can break, leaving you in the lurch.

I have threaded 1/4-20 bolts into the wall anchor quite successfully (again, last video will demonstrate). I can personally attest that they are insanely strong. Yeah, it’s a British product, but it’s the most amazing thing (see second video and first video).

ASIDE: Translation … “fixing” = “wall anchor”

-- Devin, SF, CA

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pottz

17668 posts in 2107 days


#11 posted 05-18-2021 10:01 PM



Clearly nobody has heard of Gee Fix. Can hold 250+ lbs on one bolt … in dry wall. I used 6 of them to hang a heavy duty bracket in dry wall above a door frame as well as in a ceiling. Both are strong enough that you can hang off of. If you have studs, great, but when you don t, there s always Gee Fix

A few videos demonstrating Gee Fix:

GeeFix vs Gripit - strength test - which is best?

The Strongest Plasterboard Fixing Ever!

How to install GeeFix: The Ultimate Drywall, Plasterboard, Cavity Wall Anchor

Except, I make some modifications to their system. I throw the nylon cord away and use guitar cable (if you watch the last video above you ll understand). The nylon cord can break, leaving you in the lurch.

I have threaded 1/4-20 bolts into the wall anchor quite successfully (again, last video will demonstrate). I can personally attest that they are insanely strong. Yeah, it s a British product, but it s the most amazing thing (see second video and first video).

ASIDE: Translation … “fixing” = “wall anchor”

- DevinT


looks pretty cool ill have to keep that in mind.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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xedos

348 posts in 423 days


#12 posted 05-19-2021 11:18 AM

Perhaps because these have close to a 300lb. load rating , been around for years, don’t require me to assemble them – or – buy other material to make them work , and are available today , right now at 3000 stores.

And they’re a lot less expensive.

https://toggler.com/

.......and , if you need the ultimate in commercial duty mounting points – these have been around for decades:

https://www.wingits.com/products/type/master_anchor_fasteners

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