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Exterior wooden door skin

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Forum topic by Drew posted 05-13-2021 10:56 PM 368 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Drew

5 posts in 4883 days


05-13-2021 10:56 PM

I have an exterior wood door whose skin is ruined. Do they make skins for exterior doors and if so where can I get one. Best glue substance for attaching wooden skin. Or would some type of metal skin be better.


11 replies so far

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ibewjon

2485 posts in 3916 days


#1 posted 05-14-2021 02:39 AM

I bought 1/8” redoak plywood that was called a door skin. I gave no idea if it was rated for exterior use. I used them inside. I attached with contact cement. Or if it suits your taste and needs, Formica type laminate may work.

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woodbutcherbynight

9633 posts in 3532 days


#2 posted 05-14-2021 05:09 AM

Do you intend to remove the old skin?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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tvrgeek

1944 posts in 2772 days


#3 posted 05-14-2021 11:02 AM

First, why did the original door get damaged? Sun? Water? Lack of constant maintenance?
I am assuming it is the outside surface?

Any “skin” would need to be done with exterior rated glue of which I doubt and 1/8 veneer ply is. You could probably get away with it, using powered resin glue. Finish is critical. Edge will remain venerable.

ou need to pay attention to the thickness and how it mates to the weather-stripping. If peeling paper thin veneer and adding 1/8 ply, then you have a big weather-strip issue.

I have seen come creativity using Formica, but only in a mid-century modern where you can have fun.

Often it is the bottom foot that is beat up. Common practice is a brass or stainless “kick plate” to protect the bottom of the door. ( and cover up damage)

Personally, it makes more sense to just get an insulated steel or fiberglass door unless you really want a natural wood finish. If just a slab door, then probably again best to get a new slab and get creative in protection.

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Drew

5 posts in 4883 days


#4 posted 05-14-2021 12:32 PM



Do you intend to remove the old skin?

- woodbutcherbynight


First, why did the original door get damaged? Sun? Water? Lack of constant maintenance?
I am assuming it is the outside surface?

Any “skin” would need to be done with exterior rated glue of which I doubt and 1/8 veneer ply is. You could probably get away with it, using powered resin glue. Finish is critical. Edge will remain venerable.

ou need to pay attention to the thickness and how it mates to the weather-stripping. If peeling paper thin veneer and adding 1/8 ply, then you have a big weather-strip issue.

I have seen come creativity using Formica, but only in a mid-century modern where you can have fun.

Often it is the bottom foot that is beat up. Common practice is a brass or stainless “kick plate” to protect the bottom of the door. ( and cover up damage)

Personally, it makes more sense to just get an insulated steel or fiberglass door unless you really want a natural wood finish. If just a slab door, then probably again best to get a new slab and get creative in protection.

- tvrgeek


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Drew

5 posts in 4883 days


#5 posted 05-14-2021 12:39 PM

This is an eight year old wooden door, that has been stored all this time. Unfortunately a small leak in building got to one side of double door. No rot. I already decided to use a skin of metal on bottom portion about two feet. I thought with a little luck I could remove skin, prepare and resurface with another skin before adding metal part. Will be an outside door. This is one of those determined to use rather than buy another door deals. Plus short of money.

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Drew

5 posts in 4883 days


#6 posted 05-14-2021 12:40 PM



This is an eight year old wooden door, that has been stored all this time. Unfortunately a small leak in building got to one side of double door. No rot. I already decided to use a skin of metal on bottom portion about two feet. I thought with a little luck I could remove skin, prepare and resurface with another skin before adding metal part. Will be an outside door. This is one of those determined to use rather than buy another door deals. Plus short of money.

- Drew


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Drew

5 posts in 4883 days


#7 posted 05-14-2021 12:41 PM

This is just a small storage building the doors are going on.

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ibewjon

2485 posts in 3916 days


#8 posted 05-14-2021 12:53 PM

If only a storage building, Formica may be a good option. You could pull off old, loose veneer, repair with filler for a flat surface, and add laminate.

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tbone

327 posts in 4807 days


#9 posted 05-14-2021 08:17 PM

I’ve been in the wood door business since 1978, and I can tell you that there is not a wood veneered door that is recommended for exterior use. I know it’s done, and I know that home builders would use them because of cost considerations, but you will not find a manufacturer that will back their product when it’s exposed to the elements.
Speaking of the elements, Formica will get pretty hot if it gets direct sunlight, and the water wicks up between the veneer and the stile and rail that surrounds the substrate. So it does its damage from the inside-out. That means that you may have problems with that door even AFTER repairing it.
(My 2 centavos)

-- Kinky Friedman: "The first thing I'll do if I'm elected is demand a recount."

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AlaskaGuy

6639 posts in 3432 days


#10 posted 05-14-2021 08:45 PM

A door has an inside and an outside.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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woodbutcherbynight

9633 posts in 3532 days


#11 posted 05-15-2021 03:28 AM



This is just a small storage building the doors are going on.

- Drew

As others have noted the doors do not hold up as they are not meant for this purpose. I had a temp door like this I used for 6 months on a project before I got the final door built. It soaked up water like a sponge. Despite being painted and the top and bottom sealed with silicone.

Now you can make your own exterior door with any number of methods and it should hold up for a long time.. Doesn’t have to be solid door. You can make a framed door and skin it inside and out with 5mm plywood, or 1/4 or even use 3/4 frame and put 3/8 plywood as skin on both sides. I have such doors and none have failed to date.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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