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Why mortise the hinge in both lid and box ?

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Forum topic by OldBull posted 05-13-2021 02:49 PM 414 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OldBull

411 posts in 413 days


05-13-2021 02:49 PM

Why is it standard to mortise a hinge in both the lid and box on something like a jewelry box ? Why not just mortise the hinge into the box ?

Thanks


11 replies so far

View Novamr99's profile

Novamr99

59 posts in 251 days


#1 posted 05-13-2021 03:25 PM

To keep the pivot on the same plane as the the face where the box and lid meet. If you just mortise one of the faces, and hang the hinge off the back, it may function but the aesthetics of the piece would suffer. Seeing the hinge sitting proud of the lid while there is a double depth mortise in the box just don’t look right. Also if the hinge is “sucked up” into the box with minimal exposure out the back there would be undue stress put on the screws upon repeated openings with the pivot point being offset. the back edges would press on each other. It’s like asking “Why mortise the door AND the frame?”

-- That's not an optical illusion, it just looks like one.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5278 posts in 2340 days


#2 posted 05-13-2021 03:41 PM

+1

Even though the change in the pivot point is subtle, the effects can be profound.
My primary reason to mortise both the body and lid is to keep everything looking coherent.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2840 posts in 1706 days


#3 posted 05-13-2021 05:01 PM

Ideally a box with a fully mortised hinge has no visible gap. If the hinge is not fully mortised a gap will appear on hinge edge. The thicker the hinge the larger the gap. At a certain point the misalignment may impact any latching mechanism.

Mortising a hinge isn’t that hard, especially on smaller hinges. Holding a squirmy box while chiseling is the tricky part, not the mortise itself.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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OldBull

411 posts in 413 days


#4 posted 05-13-2021 05:10 PM

Thanks all, I just suck really bad at mortising. I will do both.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1445 posts in 1021 days


#5 posted 05-13-2021 05:28 PM

It is not necessary to mortise either side for installing box hinges. These photos show the inside & out
side of the hinges on a toolbox I use for my carving tools. The “wings” of the hinge are inserted into a thin slot on both the lid & box, and pinned with a single tapered brass pin on each side.
You can see the box has had hard use over the years.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2234 posts in 719 days


#6 posted 05-13-2021 05:32 PM

Phil, you are just messing with his mind now.

What would /did you use to cut that slot?

View 1thumb's profile

1thumb

442 posts in 3274 days


#7 posted 05-13-2021 05:50 PM

i always called them butterfly hinges. Surface mount and they close inside themselves like a one side mortise

-- I actually have two thumbs

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Phil32

1445 posts in 1021 days


#8 posted 05-13-2021 06:00 PM


i always called them butterfly hinges. Surface mount and they close inside themselves like a one side mortise

- 1thumb


Neither side is surface mounted.

This box was mass produced, so the saw slot was likely cut with a small, thin circular saw blade. The cut extends beyond the hinge wing.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

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1thumb

442 posts in 3274 days


#9 posted 05-13-2021 06:20 PM


i always called them butterfly hinges. Surface mount and they close inside themselves like a one side mortise

- 1thumb

Neither side is surface mounted.

This box was mass produced, so the saw slot was likely cut with a small, thin circular saw blade. The cut extends beyond the hinge wing.

- Phil32

im prob thinking of something different, using wrong term.
https://www.build.com/product/summary/118967?uid=959457&jmtest=gg-gbav2_959457&inv=1&&source=gg-gba-pla_959457!c1046351010!a52133628435!dc!ng&gclid=CjwKCAjwnPOEBhA0EiwA609ReVDkp0mZQ8_j0MHUJ7bR2bOE4GRzWtotFVTWgRWRVtureuvhgq-WHhoCgR0QAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

-- I actually have two thumbs

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

3025 posts in 2094 days


#10 posted 05-13-2021 09:46 PM

Depends what your building you can use no mortise hinges to avoid cutting the mortise

View SMP's profile

SMP

4149 posts in 1023 days


#11 posted 05-13-2021 10:02 PM

Depends on the look you are going for. If you want it to look rustic or industrial, feel free to surface mount. Or possibly even some types of campaign furniture

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