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Inserting glass panels in a cabinet door with rubber retainer

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Forum topic by DTrak posted 05-13-2021 01:59 PM 506 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DTrak

86 posts in 2216 days


05-13-2021 01:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glass panels

I want to make a simple pendant lamp with glass panels inserted on each side. It will be just like my kitchen cabinet doors as shown in this photo.

I can’t quite figure out how the glass goes in. I understand a router bit cuts a slot and the rubber retainer holds the glass in, but does the glass slide in to three sides or is it put in after all four sides are together? What kind of router bit do I use?

I found this glass retainer== on Amazon which looks like mine. It says I need their slot cutter bit, but it’s only sold as part of a larger set I think and I don’t want to buy the whole set if I don’t have to. Is there a certain common bit made for this I can buy?

thanks
Dan


10 replies so far

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ibewjon

2483 posts in 3912 days


#1 posted 05-13-2021 02:43 PM

I would think any 1/8” slot cutter would work. Be sure it has changeable rub bearing to adjust the depth of cut. Slot all four sides, and use the retainer all around.

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DTrak

86 posts in 2216 days


#2 posted 05-13-2021 02:58 PM

makes sense. thanks!

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Lazyman

7136 posts in 2507 days


#3 posted 05-13-2021 03:47 PM

Your picture looks like it is made by cutting a rabbet around the opening the size of the glass and is held in with a quarter round that is probably tacked in place with brads or pins. If you put the glass into a slot and glue the frame together, you cannot replace it if it is broken without cutting the frame apart or cutting a rabbet and using quarter rounds to repair it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LesB

3011 posts in 4562 days


#4 posted 05-13-2021 04:05 PM

The plastic retainer strips that hold the glass in place from the inside on all 4 sides but I guess you could just do it on 2 sides. A 1/8” slot is cut in the frame for the retainer to be pressed into. It makes it very easy to install and also repair the glass. I have used these to hold glass panels in clock cases. See picture.

-- Les B, Oregon

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DTrak

86 posts in 2216 days


#5 posted 05-13-2021 06:40 PM

Ok, doesn’t look to hard. thanks all.

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Lazyman

7136 posts in 2507 days


#6 posted 05-13-2021 07:06 PM

So Les, are you saying that you can install the glass after the frame is assembled? I can’t wrap my mind around how that would work.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6633 posts in 3428 days


#7 posted 05-13-2021 08:47 PM



So Les, are you saying that you can install the glass after the frame is assembled? I can t wrap my mind around how that would work.

- Lazyman


https://youtu.be/-qdXMVip8FA

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Jeff

548 posts in 4314 days


#8 posted 05-13-2021 09:06 PM

As Les shows the glass just sits on a rabbet all the way around. The rubber insert is formed such that it presses against the glass so it doesn’t shift or rattle. Sommerfeld Tools sells a bit and the rubber insert. Easy to make and replace glass when broken (it happens during a move).

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Lazyman

7136 posts in 2507 days


#9 posted 05-13-2021 09:41 PM

Ah. I did not realize from the picture above that there is both a slot and a rabbet there. Sounds like that requires more than just a plain slot cutter. Something like the first bit in this set or both a slot cutter and rabbeting bit.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LesB

3011 posts in 4562 days


#10 posted 05-14-2021 04:01 PM

Jeff explained it before I got back.

No special router bit is actually needed if the corners are miter joints. I have done this on a table saw. It takes two passes. First cut the 1/8” slot that is the depth of the rabbit and also deep enough for the retainer rib to fit into. If your saw blade is not 1/8” you may need a second pass. Then cut off the strip that makes the rabbit.

-- Les B, Oregon

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