LumberJocks

Rip then joint this slab?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Andybb posted 05-12-2021 11:19 PM 627 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3316 posts in 1722 days


05-12-2021 11:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining maple

Shown below an 8’x3’ slab that I had planned on making large dollars on until my wife informed me that I was mistaken and that we were giving it to our oldest son for a housewarming gift that will go into the house he’s having built.

It has a bow in it as you can see. Am I right in thinking that if I rip this in half before I have it milled then joint the milled halves that I will end up with a thicker finished board? It is about 2.5” thick and dry as a bone.

-- Andy - Seattle USA


18 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3890 posts in 2917 days


#1 posted 05-13-2021 12:40 AM

I vote yes. But only if your confident in your jointer and planer 8 ft is right at the limit for most jointers that sport a 6 or 8 inch cutting head. If you only have a bench top don’t do it.
You might even consider ripping it into 3 sections but only if your confident in your jointer.
It’s a good looking piece of oak.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26300 posts in 4224 days


#2 posted 05-13-2021 01:36 AM

I think it will work! I’ve done similar things to dame the thickness of the wood.!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3890 posts in 2917 days


#3 posted 05-13-2021 01:42 AM

One thing to consider when ripping to save thickness is . When you glue it back together you’ll see the need to offset the length to match the grain back.
I think it’s a fair trade to loose some length to save some thickness.

-- Aj

View swirt's profile

swirt

6277 posts in 4091 days


#4 posted 05-13-2021 02:50 AM

Yep i think you are thinking right. It will keep you from losing as much as trying to simply plane it flat.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3316 posts in 1722 days


#5 posted 05-13-2021 03:20 AM


I vote yes. But only if your confident in your jointer and planer 8 ft is right at the limit for most jointers that sport a 6 or 8 inch cutting head. If you only have a bench top don’t do it.
You might even consider ripping it into 3 sections but only if your confident in your jointer.
It’s a good looking piece of oak.
Good Luck

- Aj2

The last table I made I got the best “joint” using my WEN track saw. Interestingly enough, I have a 10” Wahuda benchtop that has wings that spread out to 51” and a Grizzly 6” floor model (seen at the far end of the table). Still trying to decide which one to keep, but I think it’ll be the Wahuda. Small, quiet and has a spherical head (not helical, but the next best thing)

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1838 posts in 846 days


#6 posted 05-13-2021 03:51 AM

Just another way to look at it.

It’s 2 1/2” thick.
If you didn’t cut it and planned it down how (approx) thick would it end up?

I’ve made tops out of 8/4 (1 3/4”) finished and have been comfortable with the thickness.
If I could have a solid piece with no seam and keep 1 3/4” + I would rather have that then a top with a seam only to gain maybe another 1/2” in thickness.

That’s just me, but that’s how I would weigh it out.
I appreciate the beauty of having 1 solid piece over a piece with a seam, even though I know you can do a good invisible seam.

I would also take the base into consideration to know if it will help keep the top flat.
If not, cutting may help reduce some of the tension.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4153 posts in 1024 days


#7 posted 05-13-2021 04:22 AM

I was about to type up my thoughts on it but LeeRoyMan already basically beat me to it.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1515 posts in 4202 days


#8 posted 05-13-2021 09:38 AM



I was about to type up my thoughts on it but LeeRoyMan already basically beat me to it.

- SMP


Same.
I’d rather have a thinner top than one with a joint(or two).

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3890 posts in 2917 days


#9 posted 05-13-2021 02:14 PM


I vote yes. But only if your confident in your jointer and planer 8 ft is right at the limit for most jointers that sport a 6 or 8 inch cutting head. If you only have a bench top don’t do it.
You might even consider ripping it into 3 sections but only if your confident in your jointer.
It’s a good looking piece of oak.
Good Luck

- Aj2

The last table I made I got the best “joint” using my WEN track saw. Interestingly enough, I have a 10” Wahuda benchtop that has wings that spread out to 51” and a Grizzly 6” floor model (seen at the far end of the table). Still trying to decide which one to keep, but I think it ll be the Wahuda. Small, quiet and has a spherical head (not helical, but the next best thing)

- Andybb

That’s some very good accomplishments with the machines you mention.
Good Luck always

-- Aj

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1600 posts in 2078 days


#10 posted 05-13-2021 03:45 PM

I would cut them as needed and re glue.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3316 posts in 1722 days


#11 posted 05-13-2021 06:44 PM

Arrgh! Seems like there is no consensus! :-) I think I could probably get 1.5” out of it which would probably look just fine and avoid ripping it. That I think would be my preference as that would mean less work and board wrangling for me.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1600 posts in 2078 days


#12 posted 05-13-2021 07:09 PM

Just depends on what your after. For me it had to be approved npby the buyer. Here do as you please .

We had a 60” SCM planer/sander. Many options. What are they for this one?

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5284 posts in 2341 days


#13 posted 05-13-2021 08:00 PM

When you try to plane flat a warped plank, you loose 2x the depth of your shown gap if you want to keep the entire width. Based on your photo, you’d probably loose about 1-1/2” (greatest gap between your straight edge and the slab time two)

Personally, I’d rip it where you see the bend start (about mid way), flatten each half, then square the edges. You can often plan out your initial cut along a section where the grain interruption will be minimal.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3316 posts in 1722 days


#14 posted 05-15-2021 04:02 AM

So, using this down and dirty technique but am I correct that planed flat this slab should yield about 1 1/2”? Would I gain enough to make it worth the effort to rip them?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1838 posts in 846 days


#15 posted 05-15-2021 04:08 AM

That’s getting pretty thin for that big of a slab IMO
Tell me how wide it is, and how much of a cup there is,
and I could draw it in sketchup and see how much you would loose both by planning or ripping first and planning.

And how thick the slab is as well.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com