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Banding a Round Table

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Forum topic by Christopher Frank posted 11-02-2011 01:04 PM 4907 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Christopher Frank

11 posts in 4421 days


11-02-2011 01:04 PM

I’m going to be building a round table that has a 2” MDF core and will be veneered on the top and bottom. I need to band the edge. Is it best to use very thin banding or veneer? What is the best method for applying it to the core?


19 replies so far

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 3599 days


#1 posted 11-02-2011 05:19 PM

A lot of people like the iron on edge bands, they are easy to use. If you want to use your own wood then slice it around 1/8” thick and you can use ratcheting straps with cauls or a thousand rubber bands woven together to hold it. A good idea is to sharply bevel the edges of the band at the connection point so you can more easily sand it down for a seamless look.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4289 days


#2 posted 11-02-2011 06:20 PM

There’s no best way, but you can get 2” wide pre-glued banding if a thin
1/40” veneer is acceptable to you. That square edge won’t be durable
though.

1/8” to 1/4” thick solid wood banding can be bent on a hot pipe to the
general shape fairly easily, depending on species and tightness of the
radius you need. Clamping the wood to the edge is tricky though – you
can make a ton of your own clamps, use bike tires, surgical tubing, etc.

You can fix a large disk to the top of the table with nails or dowels
around the edge and another similar arrangement underneath, then
use the nails or dowels to anchor your rubber bands, surgical tubes
or bike tires. To some extent masking tape can be used if the
edging is accurately pre-bent. The brown package tape with the
water-activated glue can be used as well.

View DS's profile

DS

3380 posts in 3061 days


#3 posted 11-02-2011 06:44 PM

MDF is most vulnerable to edge impacts.

I would avoid the veneer on the edge as this will afford no protection.

I’ve used the 1/8” solid wood banding as well, but this is problematic to clamp.

Another option is to use a wider band of 3/4” or 1” solid wood (2” Thick) that can be rabitted or biscuit jointed to the edge. This can be cut on a bandsaw in sections to form the edge.
The advantages are that the edge is solid and you can route a nice table profile which will also make the veneer look seamless at the corners.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View tsmccull's profile

tsmccull

10 posts in 3104 days


#4 posted 11-03-2011 02:25 AM

I veneered the top of an old 44” round table with cherry boards about 1/2” thick and ended up with it approximately 1-1/2” thick when I was done. Cut some more cherry about 1/8” thick on the tablesaw for an edge veneer. Sears sells a Craftsman rebranded version of the Wolfcraft one-hand ratcheting band clamp (Amazon and others have it also). That band clamp works very well for applying pressure evenly all around a table in order to clamp fairly thick material for gluing (don’t think I’d try it for true veneer, since it might crush really thin material). 1/8” material for edge veneer was thin enough to bend around the circumference, but thick enough to withstand the pressure of the clamp. It’s been in place for a couple of years and I haven’t seen any delaminating anywhere yet.

View vipond33's profile

vipond33

1405 posts in 3138 days


#5 posted 11-03-2011 04:51 AM

In our shop we often veneer the edge for looks and ease of application but prior to that we put a 1/8” square piece of solid in a rebate on the top and bottom edge. This goes on easily with tape, is cut back flush and allows for light edge shaping as well as providing impact resistance. For a more durable edge make your veneer strip 2 or 3 ply with a cross band layer.

-- [email protected] : dovetail free since '53, critiques always welcome.

View DS's profile

DS

3380 posts in 3061 days


#6 posted 11-03-2011 05:31 PM

Nice solution there Gene, I wouldn’t have thought of that.
I like the idea of having a slightly eased corner too!

This is a great website!

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1103 posts in 3706 days


#7 posted 01-23-2020 10:13 PM



In our shop we often veneer the edge for looks and ease of application but prior to that we put a 1/8” square piece of solid in a rebate on the top and bottom edge. This goes on easily with tape, is cut back flush and allows for light edge shaping as well as providing impact resistance. For a more durable edge make your veneer strip 2 or 3 ply with a cross band layer.

- vipond33


Gene, I’m trying to follow your explanation here but its not sinking in. Any way you could show this in a sketch maybe??

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View PBWilson1970's profile

PBWilson1970

51 posts in 34 days


#8 posted 01-24-2020 12:49 PM

For clamping the edge, you can use bicycle inner tubes sliced lengthwise and wrapped around the tabletop. They are surprisingly effective.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1254 posts in 3434 days


#9 posted 01-24-2020 02:37 PM

I

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

597 posts in 368 days


#10 posted 01-24-2020 02:55 PM

I used 1/8” strips and did these in 2 halves, using a rachet strap to clamp.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2364 posts in 4084 days


#11 posted 01-24-2020 06:30 PM

Did anyone notice this posting was in 2011? and Christopher never responded with his chosen solution.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1103 posts in 3706 days


#12 posted 01-24-2020 09:30 PM



Did anyone notice this posting was in 2011? and Christopher never responded with his chosen solution.

- LesB


Les, the fact that its an older post doesn’t in my mind change the fact that I’m asking for help from someone who took the time to respond to the thread. Good info and advice for me are invaluable and appreciate it when given.
I brought it to the top because I needed help and this was the closest thread that I could find with similar content. On other forums I often asked if I did a search for it?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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ibewjon

1254 posts in 3434 days


#13 posted 01-24-2020 09:39 PM

I for one didn’t see the original. And learning from the past has no experation date.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

597 posts in 368 days


#14 posted 01-24-2020 09:43 PM

Nope, missed that completely.

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1103 posts in 3706 days


#15 posted 01-24-2020 09:48 PM



I used 1/8” strips and did these in 2 halves, using a rachet strap to clamp.

- LeeRoyMan


When doing this I’m thinking the hardest part was to get the sizing of both halves just right? Did you use some packing tape over the wood so the straps wouldn’t stick?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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