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How often do you clean your DC filter

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Forum topic by recycle1943 posted 05-08-2021 01:08 PM 372 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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recycle1943

5495 posts in 2745 days


05-08-2021 01:08 PM

A couple months ago I updated my DC system with a cyclone. I used my grizzly 2hp as the base unit and built around it. I even did as all of the utube videos suggested and used the enclosed clear plastic bag as the ‘dust’ receptical.
I loose track of time because I don’t have a job to go to so the days just slip by and perhaps that’s my problem.
A couple days ago I noticed an accumulation of debris around the DC unit, on the floor and just almost everywhere. So in trouble shooting I turned the DC on with the IVAC auto switch and noticed immediately that the plastic bag was near explosion point. I guess the Grizzly was pushing enough air that it was forcing stuff out of every crevice available.
It was then that I realized the filter was plugged beyond any imagination could envision. I took the filter off ( it’s on top ) and left the plastic bag in place to catch anything I may shake loose. That was kinda stupid because things were already so screwed up what makes the difference if a little dust fell on the floor lol
So I got the filter cleaned out, it took 30 or 40 minutes of bouncing it on the driveway and blowing out with compressed air. I finally got it to where only a wiff of dust appeared when I hit it with air.
So this morning I put it back together and used it to clean up most of the mess and decided it was way past time for a cup of coffee.
So the real reason for this dumb rant is to ASK
If you have an Oneida cyclone or any other DC system that uses a large pre-filter above or below the collection bag,
how often do you find yourself cleaning the filter ??

btw – I use my DC every day with the table saw, band saw and planer being the main culprits

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them


17 replies so far

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Redoak49

5274 posts in 3112 days


#1 posted 05-08-2021 01:21 PM

I have an Oneida system that is a bit different from yours. I installed a Magnehelic gauge to be able to measure the filter pressure. When it goes up, it is time to clean the filter.

I found that it is better to dump the bin early. Cleaning up after an overfill is just too much of a pain.

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therealSteveN

8009 posts in 1697 days


#2 posted 05-08-2021 02:03 PM

Dick it matters little of the setup you have for DC, the answer to how often to empty revolves completely around how much do you feed it? Not being snarky, just there isn’t a formula except the amount of use. Without some type of “I’m full” alarm when you are new to a system, or even a new part on the system the only thing you can do is check it often.

In a sense I designed mine so that the clear bag I have on for overflow is readily visible. If it get’s much of anything in it, I spin the filter handle a few times with it off. If mine is getting caked up, I can easily see it falling into the plastic bag below. A lot falls, I keep turning the handle, not much, and I only spin it a few times.

-- Think safe, be safe

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recycle1943

5495 posts in 2745 days


#3 posted 05-08-2021 09:36 PM



Dick it matters little of the setup you have for DC, the answer to how often to empty revolves completely around how much do you feed it? Not being snarky, just there isn t a formula except the amount of use. Without some type of “I m full” alarm when you are new to a system, or even a new part on the system the only thing you can do is check it often.

In a sense I designed mine so that the clear bag I have on for overflow is readily visible. If it get s much of anything in it, I spin the filter handle a few times with it off. If mine is getting caked up, I can easily see it falling into the plastic bag below. A lot falls, I keep turning the handle, not much, and I only spin it a few times.

- therealSteveN

No offense taken at all – I don’t have the spinner handle filter, wish I did things might be a little easier. Checking more often is a must do because I loose track . Perhaps a chart on the wall would help

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View crowie's profile

crowie

4675 posts in 3074 days


#4 posted 05-08-2021 10:36 PM

Thank you Dick for the timely reminder to clean my filter. I do rotate the flipper on the inside of filter every couple of weeks but haven’t taken it off to clean it in 5 bags of sawdust

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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recycle1943

5495 posts in 2745 days


#5 posted 05-09-2021 11:34 AM

You are certainly Welcome crowie. I know now that I should have gotten a filter with the inside ‘flipper’ it sure would save me some grief.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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sansoo22

1684 posts in 778 days


#6 posted 05-09-2021 04:33 PM

I have a filter with the spinny thing like Steven’s. Without a cyclone my filter tends to build up pretty quick. Table saw being the biggest culprit, I make sure to spin the flapper around once or twice after a heavy day of work at the saw. I just baked that into my clean up process. Vacuum off the TS and spin the flapper before blowing off my clothes and turning out the lights.

If I didn’t have the flapper I would go the route Redoak did with the Magnehelic gauge or I would completely forget filter maintenance entirely. Same if I had a chip collection bucket that wasn’t just a big clear bag. I’d have to get the big red light that goes off to tell me its full or I’d forget.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8009 posts in 1697 days


#7 posted 05-09-2021 06:30 PM


No offense taken at all – I don’t have the spinner handle filter, wish I did things might be a little easier. Checking more often is a must do because I loose track . Perhaps a chart on the wall would help

- recycle1943

Dick, the one thing I have taken from years of seeing Scott Phillips on TV (often wondering why not me) I use signs on my machines so that each new day before starting I do my checks.

On the Bandsaws to tension that blade

On the TS to check the DC

On the hand tools, are U sharp today???

Obviously if I don’t use that tool, don’t need to check, just to be done before I use it. It’s Oldtimers proof. Magnets or hooks keep the signs close. Sign on the door before I head out asks did you put the signs back???? Loop theory memory jogger. Can’t tell you the number of times I had to walk back around and replace signs.

-- Think safe, be safe

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recycle1943

5495 posts in 2745 days


#8 posted 05-09-2021 09:20 PM



I have a filter with the spinny thing like Steven s. Without a cyclone my filter tends to build up pretty quick. Table saw being the biggest culprit, I make sure to spin the flapper around once or twice after a heavy day of work at the saw. I just baked that into my clean up process. Vacuum off the TS and spin the flapper before blowing off my clothes and turning out the lights.

If I didn t have the flapper I would go the route Redoak did with the Magnehelic gauge or I would completely forget filter maintenance entirely. Same if I had a chip collection bucket that wasn t just a big clear bag. I d have to get the big red light that goes off to tell me its full or I d forget.

- sansoo22

I had been tapping the side of the filter with a small board and thought I was getting something done – when the dust stopped falling, I quit hitting it. I think I was just wasteing time and effort.
Now that I think about it, I just wonder how effective the flapper will be ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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recycle1943

5495 posts in 2745 days


#9 posted 05-09-2021 09:25 PM


No offense taken at all – I don’t have the spinner handle filter, wish I did things might be a little easier. Checking more often is a must do because I loose track . Perhaps a chart on the wall would help

- recycle1943

Dick, the one thing I have taken from years of seeing Scott Phillips on TV (often wondering why not me) I use signs on my machines so that each new day before starting I do my checks.

On the Bandsaws to tension that blade

On the TS to check the DC

On the hand tools, are U sharp today???

Obviously if I don t use that tool, don t need to check, just to be done before I use it. It s Oldtimers proof. Magnets or hooks keep the signs close. Sign on the door before I head out asks did you put the signs back???? Loop theory memory jogger. Can t tell you the number of times I had to walk back around and replace signs.

- therealSteveN

I guess my thing is making sure I have the right blast gate open and that one only. I have 5 gates in the system and if I leave one open and open the table saw things get backlogged. It’s really amazing how strong the vacuum is when things are right.
Today I turned the DC on, opened the TS gate and took the insert off to get the chips out of the bottom and I could feel the air rushing past my arm thru the insert opening.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3595 posts in 4067 days


#10 posted 05-09-2021 09:56 PM

What’s the range of your gauge?

I like how well my Magnehelic gauge works on my HVAC, so was thinking of putting one on each of the collectors.

The collectors will peg a gauge for an HVAC, but won’t move a automotive vacuum gauge.

My other option was to just go with a manometer and add an IV valve so I could control the pull on the fluid.


I have an Oneida system that is a bit different from yours. I installed a Magnehelic gauge to be able to measure the filter pressure. When it goes up, it is time to clean the filter.

I found that it is better to dump the bin early. Cleaning up after an overfill is just too much of a pain.

- Redoak49


View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3595 posts in 4067 days


#11 posted 05-09-2021 10:00 PM

I installed plexi on the inside of drums for my collectors and the cyclone. I can tell, just looking over, if I need to tend the collection “buckets.”

I use clear bags on my cyclone, so have to have a cage in it. Even with the bag and cage, I can still see what I need to monitor the level of dust and chips.

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Kelly

3595 posts in 4067 days


#12 posted 05-09-2021 10:04 PM

SIDE NOTE: Two of my collectors use bags and one uses cartridges. If I clean the cartridges or the bags and start the system up, the improvement is not always notable.

I figured out the debris was falling on the plate between the collection bag and the filter section. When I shook it vigorously, I’d note a large amount of dust fall down into the bag. Then, when I started the collector, I’d note a huge improvement.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7145 posts in 2510 days


#13 posted 05-09-2021 10:11 PM

Stumpy Nubs did a video a few years ago where he made a simple manometer to measure the suction to give him a visual indicator that it is time to clean the filter, though you still have to remember to look at it from time to time. As the filter clogs, the suction pressure will drop. if you don’t want to make one, you can probably just buy a cheap one like this. You could also put one on the outbound side to see when the pressure builds up because the filter is clogged.

A question for you cyclone/DC owners…How much dust actually makes it through the cyclone to even clog the filter. The cheap thien baffle style cyclone that I made for my shop vac barely lets any dust through unless I am doing a lot of MDF or something that generates lots of wood flour like sanding does. Even then only a small amount of fine dust winds up in the vac filter. I know that the shop vac is a different animal but I am just wondering if some tuning is needed to make sure the dust actually winds up in the cyclone bucket instead of making it all the way to the filter or maybe the cyclone is too small for the DC?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Kelly

3595 posts in 4067 days


#14 posted 05-09-2021 10:21 PM

How my dust gets past my Deputies, Super Dust Deputy and Gorilla depends on how much in the way of fine’s I’m producing.

The drum in the photo above is about 30 gallons. I may empty it five times before I have to clean my filters. Or I may have to after one. Regardless, so little gets through that I have to empty the collector bag every five or ten years, though I’ve emptied the 30 gallon drum, say, fifty times.

When I was using a Dust Deputy on my Paint Shaver Pro (it’s like an angle grinder with three carbide tips and removes about one square foot of paint from siding in about one minute), the vac would clog in five minutes or less. I added the cyclone and my run time went to about twenty minutes. When you’re dealing with that kind of nasty, that’s a huge improvement.

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Kelly

3595 posts in 4067 days


#15 posted 05-09-2021 10:24 PM

The problem I have is, the collector wants to empty the manometer almost immediately. Thus the need for a an air flow valve like an IV valve.


. . . .
As the filter clogs, the suction pressure will drop. if you don t want to make one, you can probably just buy a cheap one like this. You could also put one on the outbound side to see when the pressure builds up because the filter is clogged.
- Lazyman

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