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Question about TS Rip Blades

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 05-06-2021 06:44 PM 431 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

427 posts in 2500 days


05-06-2021 06:44 PM

I am in the process of deciding on a new TS and would like to get dedicated rip and cross cut blades.
Looking at Freud since they seem to be prevalent, reasonable cost and I have a Freud combo blade I like.
They have Glue Line blades but only recommend for up to 1” depth which honestly would be most of the time.
But if I want to rip something thicker than 1” does it mean i cannot use this blade? Would it damage it?
They also have a thin kerf version.
They have a heavy duty rip blade for 3/4 to 2-3/4” depth.
So do I need two rip blades?
Should I be looking at a different manufacturer like Forrest?
Part of my decision process is whether to get a 2HP or 3HP saw.
My sticking point is spending $250 – $300 to have 220V outlet installed, so my preference is 2HP.
But I am afraid with 2HP I might be limited to a thin kerf blade.
I am a hobbyist, so speed of cut does not matter.

Thanks for any advice.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


17 replies so far

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1600 posts in 2078 days


#1 posted 05-06-2021 07:09 PM

Your jumping from Fraud to Forrest. That’s a large jump without looking at all good blades inbetween.

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

427 posts in 2500 days


#2 posted 05-06-2021 07:14 PM



Your jumping from Fraud to Forrest. That s a large jump without looking at all good blades inbetween.

- JackDuren

And what would those be?

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2841 posts in 1707 days


#3 posted 05-06-2021 07:15 PM

Freud LU83 is a rock solid TK combo blade that’ll rip 3” resaw on jatoba.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5354 posts in 5079 days


#4 posted 05-06-2021 07:16 PM

I use both thin and thick rippers. The thin one seems to work better/easier on the thicker stuff.
I have a grizz 0444Z contractor’s saw.

-- [email protected]

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JackDuren

1600 posts in 2078 days


#5 posted 05-06-2021 07:22 PM

Your jumping from Fraud to Forrest. That s a large jump without looking at all good blades inbetween.

- JackDuren

And what would those be?

- Joel_B

I’m not going to sell you blades. Your going to get a crackerack box full of responses on which blade to buy. The best thing to do is read up on blade characteristics and learn what you need and then decide on a brand ..

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

427 posts in 2500 days


#6 posted 05-06-2021 07:24 PM



Freud LU83 is a rock solid TK combo blade that ll rip 3” resaw on jatoba.

- Madmark2

I have Freud Premier Fusion TK on my Craftsman TS and it has worked well.
I asked the question because I was under the impression I would get better results with dedicated blades.
I have noticed some chipping on crosscuts that I don’t get when using my miter saw which was a very old fine tooth blade on it. Maybe I should continue with my Freud combo blade and just get a cross cut blade.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8421 posts in 4494 days


#7 posted 05-06-2021 08:36 PM

The Freud 30T GLR blade can burn more easily in 1” + material. You can use it, but it’s not ideal for thick rip cuts…20-24T FTG would be better for that.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

427 posts in 2500 days


#8 posted 05-06-2021 08:51 PM



The Freud 30T GLR blade can burn more easily in 1” + material. You can use it, but it s not ideal for thick rip cuts…20-24T FTG would be better for that.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

- knotscott

I started reading your blog post. This is a treasure trove of information.
I don’t have time to read it all right now but certainly will do so tonight.

Thanks!

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8009 posts in 1693 days


#9 posted 05-06-2021 08:53 PM

Only because it’s such a good article/post on saw blades I’m gonna drop Scott’s link again, in case you missed it.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

-- Think safe, be safe

View NickyMac's profile

NickyMac

36 posts in 487 days


#10 posted 05-06-2021 09:00 PM

A quality combo blade is “good” at most things, enough so that many hobbyists (and some pros) leave them on the saw even when they shouldn’t!

The Freud fusion you have is pretty good, that’s one I’m using right now. The only thing is that Freud carbides are a bit small, so you get less sharpening’s out of the blade.

Dedicated blades are nice when you need a PERFECT cut or are pushing the reasonable boundaries of a combo blade.

A dedicated rip blade is nice to have to speed up long rips and put less strain on the saw. Also, because they have flat top kerfs, they are nice for dados, rabbets, and similar joinery. My 2hp saw has been doing fine with a full kerf rip blade, but I haven’t been trying to resaw. FWIW, mine is a 24t 10” rip from the new WoodRiver line, and it’s been great so far. Nice thick carbides.

A dedicated cross-cut is helpful with species that are prone to chipping or for angled cuts where the corners get super thin.

I’ve been using a combo blade for almost everything, and then switching to a rip as needed.

-- - Nick

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3864 posts in 4556 days


#11 posted 05-06-2021 09:14 PM

I can speak for the freud ICE blades. Their Industrial ones that are silver. I have a RIP and a Crosscut blade. I love, love them both. They cut so well for what they cost. The teeth are beefy and I’ve had them sharpened three times at Rocklers.
Alas I put them aside because I have a sawstop and the shoulder teeth can thwart the speed of the safety mechanism. I got an Amana. Decent blade but while in the same price range as the Freud’s it’s no contest. Still looking for a good blade to replace my freuds without breaking the bank.

Ya, ya, I know I’ll probably end up with Forrest…..

I did try the feud glueline blades when they were all the rage after they came out. I did not like them at all.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View MikeJ70's profile

MikeJ70

94 posts in 1066 days


#12 posted 05-07-2021 03:54 PM

Joel_B, I started out with dedicated blades – Freud 24T Heavy Duty Rip and Freud 80T Ultimate Cutoff. They were fine and got the job done, but my buddy had bought a Forrest Woodworker II and said his cuts were super clean and it was so nice not having to switch blades.

I didn’t think switching blades was that big of a deal, until I had a major screw up on a project and I wanted to quickly remake some parts. Then it turned into a pain. So when I had the cash I decided to get the Woodworker II and I have never looked back. It way out performed my two Freud blades for both types of cuts. There are probably better dedicated blades than the ones I chose, but I can’t imagine they cut better than my Woodworker II.

This has been my experience and is my opinion. I try not to be a fan boy to any particular brand, but previous to buying the Woodworker II, I had used the Forrest Chopmaster in my miter saw for several years and was really pleased with it. You need to decide what will work best for you and sometimes you just won’t know until you try. There are other good brands out there, and you might find something different that works for you, but for my money, I will stick with Forrest.

-- MikeJ

View MikeJ70's profile

MikeJ70

94 posts in 1066 days


#13 posted 05-07-2021 04:01 PM


Alas I put them aside because I have a sawstop and the shoulder teeth can thwart the speed of the safety mechanism.

Craftsman, I don’t understand this statement. Can you explain it better? I might be upgrading to a cabinet saw sometime in the near future and the Sawstop is at the top of my list. I just want to know if there are any nuances with this saw that I am not aware of. Thanks.

-- MikeJ

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

427 posts in 2500 days


#14 posted 05-07-2021 04:05 PM



Joel_B, I started out with dedicated blades – Freud 24T Heavy Duty Rip and Freud 80T Ultimate Cutoff. They were fine and got the job done, but my buddy had bought a Forrest Woodworker II and said his cuts were super clean and it was so nice not having to switch blades.

I didn t think switching blades was that big of a deal, until I had a major screw up on a project and I wanted to quickly remake some parts. Then it turned into a pain. So when I had the cash I decided to get the Woodworker II and I have never looked back. It way out performed my two Freud blades for both types of cuts. There are probably better dedicated blades than the ones I chose, but I can t imagine they cut better than my Woodworker II.

This has been my experience and is my opinion. I try not to be a fan boy to any particular brand, but previous to buying the Woodworker II, I had used the Forrest Chopmaster in my miter saw for several years and was really pleased with it. You need to decide what will work best for you and sometimes you just won t know until you try. There are other good brands out there, and you might find something different that works for you, but for my money, I will stick with Forrest.

- MikeJ70

On my Craftsman it sucks to change blades. And I agree it can lead to screw ups especially if the blades are slightly different widths. This might be a better solution than separate rip and crosscut blades.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7024 posts in 3612 days


#15 posted 05-07-2021 04:06 PM

If a blade has anti kickback nubs on it, it might impair the brake when it grips the blade after being triggered. Even so, most of the blades I use have the anti kickback feature. I suspect it’s more of a problem with dado sets, it looks like some of the newer ones are doing away or modifying the anti kickback nubs. I have a Freud set that’s been sharpened twice, and the sharpener ground those nibs back (substantially) during the second sharpening. I wouldn’t let this be a factor in your decision making. But that’s just my opinion.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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