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Forum topic by Jorge313 posted 04-19-2021 08:03 PM 494 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jorge313

9 posts in 59 days


04-19-2021 08:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe stand tips

Ok, you guys are my go to geniuses and I really appreciate all the solid advice I’ve read here.

I recently bought a Nova Comet DR 14 midi lathe and am planning to build a stand for it. I tried it out just setting it on my workbench (which is pretty solid) and at times there was some moderate vibration. Not horrendous but between that and the height being a little tall for me I figured I’d make a stand.

I’ve been reading up and looking at various plans and have a basic idea in mind. I also have a decent handle on the height, but before i start cutting lumber I want to ask a few things.

First is weight. I know that heavy = less vibration, so I plan to have a weighted base. Because my wife is (what better than a saint?) wonderful and let me have a whole bunch of new toys I want to keep the expense to a minimum. So for weight I have some landscaping bricks that are about 22 Lbs each that I was thinking of stacking in the base instead of using sand. Will that work if they’re in fairly snugly or are they likely to rattle around?

Next I’m planning a solid top out of milled 2×4s. It’s way cheaper than if I double up a sheet of plywood. I’m planning to bolt the tool to the top so it won’t move but I’m wondering if I should also try and put some heavy rubber grommets between the tool and the bench top to try and dampen any vibration.

It’s more or less going to look like this work bench I made for my kids a few years ago with the weight box just over the floor, and a shelf of two in the middle. I’m also thinking about making it a little long so I can keep some things stored on the bench top with easy reach but not close enough to make removing the tail stock difficult.

Here’s a picture of the kids bench just to give you an idea.

I’m planning to make the feet longer for added stability and to either use workbench casters on the ends to make it mobile.

Any thoughts or advice will be greatly appreciated.


21 replies so far

View RClark's profile

RClark

126 posts in 3266 days


#1 posted 04-19-2021 08:24 PM

I have a Jet Midi with bed extension bolted to a home-made work bench. Other than length, it’s conceptually similar to yours in the picture.

I think you’ll be fine with those landscaping bricks.

I don’t have mine weighted and I don’t have an issue with vibration. We’re usually not turning heavy pieces of wood on these smaller lathes. I think if I had something on the lathe which would shake around several landscape pavers like that, then I have a real balance issue that has to be addressed.

-- Ray

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2651 posts in 1669 days


#2 posted 04-19-2021 08:25 PM

Make the back feet long enough to keep the lathe from walking. The legs should hold the lathe at the optimum work distance from the wall. This will also make the lathe less tippy when you push on it.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

210 posts in 1915 days


#3 posted 04-19-2021 08:57 PM

I know you said you wanted to avoid using ply for stand and with the current price, I understand. I did build mine out of ply and ended up using about a sheet and 1/2. My lathe is a Nova drv xp, so a little larger than yours. I get no vibration unless I am turning a large out of balance piece which is going to happen regardless of the stand. The cabinet is about 24×52” inches and allows me to have a place for me set the turning tools I am using for a particular project. I don’t have any shop space to store all of the lathe related stuff so the 10 drawers are perfect for my needs.
The only downside is that if I forget to shut a drawer while turning I have to vacuum out the drawer.

View Jorge313's profile

Jorge313

9 posts in 59 days


#4 posted 04-19-2021 09:44 PM

Mark- great tip, I’ll do that. Thanks!

Bob, I’m still pretty new and this and am a little intimidated by drawers. I am thinking about making the shelf into a lidded box that I can use with some hinges I have laying around. Keeping dust out of the tools seems like a smart idea.

I really like the stand in the back for your centers and the drill chuck, etc as well as the rest to hold additional tools. ’m going to add those for sure. Thanks for the tips!

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

210 posts in 1915 days


#5 posted 04-19-2021 11:16 PM



Mark- great tip, I’ll do that. Thanks!

Bob, I’m still pretty new and this and am a little intimidated by drawers. I am thinking about making the shelf into a lidded box that I can use with some hinges I have laying around. Keeping dust out of the tools seems like a smart idea.

I really like the stand in the back for your centers and the drill chuck, etc as well as the rest to hold additional tools. ’m going to add those for sure. Thanks for the tips!

- Jorge313


It is just shop furniture, and I wasn’t in the mood to make a “proper” drawer. These are just cut to length and pocket screwed.

View Chenier's profile

Chenier

39 posts in 788 days


#6 posted 04-20-2021 12:39 AM

The goal of adding mass is to inhibit vibration of the lathe via the inertia of the mass. If you want the landscaping bricks to be effective, they need to be rigidly attached to the lathe, even if indirectly, so their mass is added to the lathe’s mass.

If you’re going to put the weights low down in the base, there can be no wiggle whatsoever in the legs. Think massive legs and attachments. Alternatively put them in a box firmly fixed to the bottom of the tabletop.

Either way, the bricks shouldn’t be able to shift around. Wedge them in place.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2651 posts in 1669 days


#7 posted 04-20-2021 12:56 AM

Only put fixed casters at one end and turn a couple of handles for the other end. Lift slightly and it rolls easily, set it down and it sits solid. The fixed wheels are aligned lengthwise so they block the lateral forces while turning.

This “wheelbarrow” style mobile base works all over the shop. No locking casters needed.


Planer on wheelbarrow mobile base — note shop turned handles.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

262 posts in 1325 days


#8 posted 04-20-2021 02:23 AM

For my Rikon 10×18 lathe (mini?) I built a stand from 2x material with angled legs and it’s solid—I thought I would put weight on the bottom, but never did—it just doesn’t move! Granted, I have not turned any large or extremely unbalanced pieces, and it’s not a big lathe, but I have been very pleased with the stand. Will try to remember to take a photo tomorrow.

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

127 posts in 1130 days


#9 posted 04-20-2021 03:39 AM

I made a rolling stand out of plywood. The top is two layers of 3/4” plywood. I put two large drawers on the front for lathe tools and supplies and doors on the bottom where I store my face shield and a plastic case with my pen turning bushings. The bench is deep enough that my slow speed grinder with the Wolverine sharpening jig fits on the back side. When not in use, the long arm of the Wolverine jig slides under the lathe. The extra pieces under the feet of my lathe help provide the clearance. I need to take an updated picture of the back side, as I’ve since added a bracket that holds a dust collection tray. I’ve not had any vibration problems with this setup so far.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View sepeck's profile

sepeck

505 posts in 3222 days


#10 posted 04-20-2021 05:03 AM

I have an old Delta lathe with one of those angle iron stand. I used to have a piece of plywood on the cross pieces and just had a bag on concrete stored on it. But eventually I found for the smaller projects I was doing it didn’t noticeably help. Your mileage may vary.

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

View mike02719's profile

mike02719

303 posts in 4867 days


#11 posted 04-20-2021 12:25 PM

I am not a fan of storing lathe tools in drawers because of wasted time opening a drawer to change tools. Shelf storage with handle down makes selection easy. A set of shelves is in back of my lathe and the chisels etc. are in 4×4’s drilled to accept the handles. The shelf closest to the cutting area is a great place to put the dust collector fixture while sanding. The lower shelves store the less used equipment and supplies. Not as much chips land there as one would expect.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

View sepeck's profile

sepeck

505 posts in 3222 days


#12 posted 04-20-2021 04:36 PM



I am not a fan of storing lathe tools in drawers because of wasted time opening a drawer to change tools. Shelf storage with handle down makes selection easy. A set of shelves is in back of my lathe and the chisels etc. are in 4×4 s drilled to accept the handles. The shelf closest to the cutting area is a great place to put the dust collector fixture while sanding. The lower shelves store the less used equipment and supplies. Not as much chips land there as one would expect.

- mike02719

While I agree with you on not storing all the tools, I am planning on building some drawers underneath mine for storing all the misc things like spare faceplates, chucks, pen mandrels and bushings.

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2794 posts in 3071 days


#13 posted 04-20-2021 04:59 PM

The primary vibration plane will be perpendicular to the lathe bed. The unloaded lathe shouldn’t vibrate, and rubber grommets are not needed, but there could be some hi freq motor buzz which grommets might take care of. As mentioned, put the extra weight as hi as possible and attached so it moves with the stand. The wider you make the legs the better the low freq motion from out of balance work will be controlled. Torsion box construction side to side of the legs will tie the stand together to better resist this motion. Depends on how large your projects get. Torsion box along the back of the stand (in line with the bed) will help some, mainly in moving the stand around. Regardless of what wheel arrangement you end up using, the stand needs to be supported by feet and not wheels when turning.

View Jorge313's profile

Jorge313

9 posts in 59 days


#14 posted 04-20-2021 05:58 PM

That’s exactly what I’m planning to store- chucks, jaws, face plates, pen stuff- all the things that aren’t regularly switched during operation.

Unfortunately my tool chest is too full to be readily useful, so into the stand they’ll go.

But I’ll keep the hand tools either on the top in a rest or I’m thinking of allowing them to hang on the side with the headstock when the lathe isn’t in use. Bob has a picture above with some top storage/rests that I really like the look of.

View Jorge313's profile

Jorge313

9 posts in 59 days


#15 posted 04-20-2021 06:05 PM

OSU55- I understand what you’re saying g and I’m sure you’re correct.

My only concern, having no experience with turning and stands, is raising the center of gravity of the tool and stand. Will it be too heavy and more likely to tip?

The tool weighs about 90 lbs and I was planning on about 100 lbs of ballast.

And yes, I was planning on having the stand off the wheels and in contact with the floor when in use. I’m too old and am too used to having 10 fingers to go chasing running equipment around the shop.

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