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Dewalt 735X dust hose, replacement blades?

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Forum topic by nickbatz posted 04-17-2021 08:34 PM 449 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


04-17-2021 08:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer

1. Am I going to regret having ordered this relatively cheap hose?

https://smile.amazon.com/Inch-Feet-Dust-Collection-Hose/dp/B087ZMXR3L/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_pb_opt?ie=UTF8#HLCXComparisonWidget_feature_div

The 4” dryer duct hose I picked up at my local hardware store is causing me to invent new swear words and run out of duct tape.

It’s too short, which allows the dust collection bag to roll straight in front of the planer, which means the hose gets in the way of boards coming out, which then rip the fragile hose, which then results in chips all over.

2. Should I just buy Dewalt replacement blades? (I’m not interested in the helical cutter head – too $$$.)

TIA


17 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3844 posts in 2885 days


#1 posted 04-17-2021 08:52 PM

Infinity tools used to make hss and carbide tipped knives for the 735.
I have not tried the hss but I did use the carbide tip and they were great.
I wouldn’t recommend a insert head for the small motor in the 735 planer.
Good luck

-- Aj

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2881 posts in 4009 days


#2 posted 04-17-2021 08:57 PM

10 feet of hose should work well for this. I have mine mounted to the wall to keep it out of the way of the exiting wood.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1380 posts in 2648 days


#3 posted 04-17-2021 09:30 PM



Infinity tools used to make hss and carbide tipped knives for the 735.
I have not tried the hss but I did use the carbide tip and they were great. I wouldn t recommend a insert head for the small motor in the 735 planer.
Good luck

- Aj2


???? Are you talking about a helical head? That is a popular upgrade and works very well.

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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


#4 posted 04-17-2021 10:32 PM


???? Are you talking about a helical head? That is a popular upgrade and works very well.

- WhyMe

I think that is what he’s talking about, and it’s the first time I’ve seen anyone question it.

My objection is simply that the price is way out of proportion to the machine for my uses.

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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


#5 posted 04-17-2021 11:24 PM


Infinity tools used to make hss and carbide tipped knives for the 735.
I have not tried the hss but I did use the carbide tip and they were great.
I wouldn t recommend a insert head for the small motor in the 735 planer.
Good luck

- Aj2

They’re on sale for $229.

That’s almost irritating.

Edit: they do have HSS ones for $80/set.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4463 posts in 3435 days


#6 posted 04-18-2021 02:29 AM

I buy the Dewalt replacement blades. Usually you get a 2 pack of blades for ~$80, plus each blade can be flipped over to use the other edge. That is a decent deal. I don’t plane so much wood that I go thru blades all that fast. I’ve heard of sharpening systems and tried one from Woodworkers Supply that didn’t really work for me. You can buy a lot of OEM blade sets for $229.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


#7 posted 04-18-2021 02:54 AM

Thanks Earl.

Just to double-check – that’s two sets of blades, i.e. six knives?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3844 posts in 2885 days


#8 posted 04-18-2021 03:40 AM

What’s the number one reason new woodworkers justify to buy or put a insert head in a jointer.
It takes too long to set knives it’s too hard and they don’t last very long.
One advantage the 735 has its knives are indexed. So there’s no setting them as long as the factory didn’t screw up the grind in their jig. The knives should and will be in a perfect cutting circle.
Why do insert heads take more power to cut and why is the depth of cut so shallow.
Because inserts heads have very little forward rake they present the little tiny carbide with a face bevel at 30 degrees.
This really is a scraping action then a scooping cut.
It doesn’t matter to me if you want to disregard the engineers that designed a 735 planer and put in a 250$ head that’s starts bogging down if you take more then a 1/64 cut.
I know it’s really popular to have the same tools the social influencers have on YouTube.
I’m just trying to illuminate here that’s all. Lots of misinformation out there that’s getting soaked up by the new generation of woodworkers.
Good Luck Everyone

-- Aj

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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


#9 posted 04-18-2021 05:45 AM

As I said, that thing isn’t for me either.

I do know from replacing the gears in a motorscooter that helical gears are smoother but don’t deliver as much torque. So what you’re saying doesn’t sound crazy to me at all, now that I think about it.

Whether you’re second-guessing design engineers vs. enhancing a machine by putting on better parts… kinda hard to make a universal rule about which applies in every situation. :)

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1872 posts in 2736 days


#10 posted 04-18-2021 09:19 AM

Well, just put a Lux head in mine. Works fine. Smoother. First few pieces came out scraper ready. No washboard.

Factory knives, being indexed, are fine if you only replace them. So basically can’t re-sharpen. You can slip them side to side just a tad. As I seem to get a nick about every other time I used my old Delta, I went helical-carbide. I don’t do more than about a 1/32 cut anyway. It is not a 7 HP production shop tool, so don’t expect it to take 1/8 off 12 wide purpleheart.

I am not sure about the angle the bevel attacks the wood. They are mounted at a different angle and are reverse bevel from strait blades. I might be able to make a measurement on my jointer. I put a Byrd on it.

As far as bogging down, it is well documented even though Delta ships it with a 15A plug, even with strait blades it should be used on a 20 A circuit. It is documented the carbide heads do require a bit more current. The exact reason I am not sure, but with 4 rows and the amount of overlap, I suspect there is a little more knife on the wood than the strait blades but the actual angle of attack could be different.


What’s the number one reason new woodworkers justify to buy or put a insert head in a jointer.
It takes too long to set knives it’s too hard and they don’t last very long.
One advantage the 735 has its knives are indexed. So there’s no setting them as long as the factory didn’t screw up the grind in their jig. The knives should and will be in a perfect cutting circle.
Why do insert heads take more power to cut and why is the depth of cut so shallow.
Because inserts heads have very little forward rake they present the little tiny carbide with a face bevel at 30 degrees.
This really is a scraping action then a scooping cut.
It doesn’t matter to me if you want to disregard the engineers that designed a 735 planer and put in a 250$ head that’s starts bogging down if you take more then a 1/64 cut.
I know it’s really popular to have the same tools the social influencers have on YouTube.
I’m just trying to illuminate here that’s all. Lots of misinformation out there that’s getting soaked up by the new generation of woodworkers.
Good Luck Everyone

- Aj2


View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1872 posts in 2736 days


#11 posted 04-18-2021 09:23 AM

I think comparing the cutter heads with gear sets is a poor analogy.
I also might suggest further reading on gears:
http://gearmakers.com/helical-gear-info/


As I said, that thing isn t for me either.

I do know from replacing the gears in a motorscooter that helical gears are smoother but don t deliver as much torque. So what you re saying doesn t sound crazy to me at all, now that I think about it.

Whether you re second-guessing design engineers vs. enhancing a machine by putting on better parts… kinda hard to make a universal rule about which applies in every situation. :)

- nickbatz


View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3844 posts in 2885 days


#12 posted 04-18-2021 01:36 PM

Tvrgeek the dewalt blades can be resharpened several times. ESP the carbide tipped ones the blades come with a 45 degree bevel.
The factory will probably tell us not too so they can sell more blades.
Here’s a pic of the fixture I made when I had a 735 the angle of slots is 45 and the cheap diamond hone is made by Smith.

Good luck

-- Aj

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WhyMe

1380 posts in 2648 days


#13 posted 04-18-2021 02:46 PM

I have the DW735 and used it with the straight blades for around 5+ years. Resharpened lots of times and also replaced a couple of times. I bit the bullet and purchased the shelix head a few years ago. I saw all the comments about the power consumption and the breaker on the machine tripping but went for it anyway. I can say from my experience is that I’ve been very happy with the helix head. It is so much quieter cutting and the finish of the cut has been better than the straight blades. I’ve had no issues with any power trips and I take as deep of cuts as I did with straight blades. The DW735 having HSS straight blades is simply a design to keep the price point of the planer inline with what an average woodworking person may be willing to pay. I’m sure the debate will continue.

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nickbatz

722 posts in 1167 days


#14 posted 04-18-2021 10:25 PM



I think comparing the cutter heads with gear sets is a poor analogy.

Actually it’s a very good analogy, and I’ve run both helical and straight gears to know that!

But I don’t have an opinion – or any personal interest – about whether those cutter heads are a good upgrade. Undoubtedly they are to the people here who are happy with them, but there are also better table saws, bandsaws, drill presses, and jointers than mine.

And faster computers, and on and on.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3844 posts in 2885 days


#15 posted 04-19-2021 03:05 AM

Heres a pic of a spiral head in a planer with carbide segments and forward rake. Clearly the bevel is on the back
So why aren’t these talked about ? Is it too expensive? Don’t the Social media influencer want to out do their competition for more viewers.

Here’s the bryd head
The bryd head looks kinda silly in comparison

-- Aj

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