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Anchor steel rod into cedar beam?

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Forum topic by Offbottom posted 04-16-2021 11:15 AM 424 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Offbottom

2 posts in 33 days


04-16-2021 11:15 AM

Hello Gents,

I’m working on a project and would appreciate advice and ideas. I need to anchor a ¾” steel rod (sucker rod, for those of you in oil states) into a 6” x 6” cedar beam. It doesn’t need to hold much tension, maybe 15 pounds max, but I don’t want it to get loose, either.

I’m a welder so I know about every trick in the book for joining steel but I’m as dumb as a sack of hammers about mating wood and steel. Glue of some sort seems obvious but there are bound to be other good ideas too.

Thanks for the advice!
David Cox
Midland, Texas


14 replies so far

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

397 posts in 1862 days


#1 posted 04-16-2021 11:37 AM

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4456 posts in 2581 days


#2 posted 04-16-2021 11:54 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks!

Wood moves with exposure to temp changes and moisture. So what might be tight in beginning, does not stay that way. Where you want to mount the rod, relative the wood beam matters too.
A picture would help us understand.

Normal way to attach metal to wood is with fasteners. Maybe weld on a base plate and use lag screws into beam. Could also thread 8” of the sucker rod, and use nut/washer on each side beam with thru hole.

BTW – 3/4” steel sucker rod weighs about 1.25lb per foot, and can put a large load on wooden beam.
If you only need to support 15lb load, why not use a 1/4” screw in eye bolt? :-)

Best Luck

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1872 posts in 2736 days


#3 posted 04-16-2021 11:59 AM

PL-Premium stays somewhat compliant for decades, so it moves with the wood. Constant tension can cause it to flow. Great stuff, used a lot, but not sure it is the correct material for your project.

You can’t just through bolt the rod?

View squazo's profile

squazo

209 posts in 2732 days


#4 posted 04-16-2021 04:33 PM

2 part epoxy. Maybe even the concrete anchoring variety. Or weld a lag bolt to it.

View SMP's profile

SMP

3999 posts in 992 days


#5 posted 04-16-2021 04:49 PM

For metal stair balusters into wood i usually use pl-400 for the bottom and then the no-drip epoxy on the top.

https://www.amazon.com/Devcon-5-Minute-Epoxy-Gel-14265/dp/B001G1ZA7U

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

827 posts in 1289 days


#6 posted 04-16-2021 05:25 PM

simpson framing products offer lotsa options on wood to steel, block ect.

-- Living the dream

View squazo's profile

squazo

209 posts in 2732 days


#7 posted 04-16-2021 05:42 PM

Doesn’t cedar destroy non galvanized or non stainless metal? Lots of cedar fences with black drips from the nails.

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SMP

3999 posts in 992 days


#8 posted 04-16-2021 06:02 PM



Doesn t cedar destroy non galvanized or non stainless metal? Lots of cedar fences with black drips from the nails.

- squazo

Good point, yeah I always use galvanized on cedar fencing

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1872 posts in 2736 days


#9 posted 04-16-2021 09:12 PM

But we still don’t really know what the OP is trying to do.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5141 posts in 2309 days


#10 posted 04-16-2021 09:26 PM



But we still don t really know what the OP is trying to do.

- tvrgeek

Has that ever stopped us? 8^)

Aside from the good advice WRT glue, another non-permanent option would be a metal (stainless/galvanized/non-cedar reactive) cross pin.

View Offbottom's profile

Offbottom

2 posts in 33 days


#11 posted 04-16-2021 11:51 PM

Hey Fellers,
Thanks for the excellent input and suggestions. Consider your keystrokes a contribution to the uninformed.

Just a little more info—this is indoor, will never see weather but +1 to the guy that mentioned the black drips. The sucker rods are more decorative than structural. I can’t get to the back of the beams so there is that limitation as far running the rod all the way through. Someone also mentioned welding a plate to the rod and lag-bolting the plate to the beam. That was actually my first suggestion to the client which got nixed because it wasn’t “clean enough” to suit them.

The “Premium” and epoxy are all great suggestions and I’ll keep that in mind for the future. However, my “why didn’t I think of that” moment came when I read squazo’s comment “weld a lag bolt to it”. Of course! What I’ll do it exactly that—weld a pretty good size lag bolt to the end of the rod. I’ll drill a 3/4” hole in the beam about 2” deep and then drill a pilot hole for the lag bolt another 2” deeper. Then run the rod in the hole and screw in the lag bolt with a pipe wrench on the sucker rod.

That solution will be super clean, simple, strong enough, fast and cheap. Rarely do I think of a solutions that meets all those criteria on my own. You guys have been a world of help. Thanks.

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1218 posts in 473 days


#12 posted 04-18-2021 09:50 PM



Hey Fellers,
Thanks for the excellent input and suggestions. Consider your keystrokes a contribution to the uninformed.

Just a little more info—this is indoor, will never see weather but +1 to the guy that mentioned the black drips. The sucker rods are more decorative than structural. I can t get to the back of the beams so there is that limitation as far running the rod all the way through. Someone also mentioned welding a plate to the rod and lag-bolting the plate to the beam. That was actually my first suggestion to the client which got nixed because it wasn t “clean enough” to suit them.

The “Premium” and epoxy are all great suggestions and I ll keep that in mind for the future. However, my “why didn t I think of that” moment came when I read squazo s comment “weld a lag bolt to it”. Of course! What I ll do it exactly that—weld a pretty good size lag bolt to the end of the rod. I ll drill a 3/4” hole in the beam about 2” deep and then drill a pilot hole for the lag bolt another 2” deeper. Then run the rod in the hole and screw in the lag bolt with a pipe wrench on the sucker rod.

That solution will be super clean, simple, strong enough, fast and cheap. Rarely do I think of a solutions that meets all those criteria on my own. You guys have been a world of help. Thanks.

- Offbottom


For that matter, UNC threads on the sucker rod and a properly sized hole will allow you to screw it in the same way and avoid the welding part.

-- Darrel

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1218 posts in 473 days


#13 posted 04-18-2021 09:52 PM



Hey Fellers,
Thanks for the excellent input and suggestions. Consider your keystrokes a contribution to the uninformed.

Just a little more info—this is indoor, will never see weather but +1 to the guy that mentioned the black drips. The sucker rods are more decorative than structural. I can t get to the back of the beams so there is that limitation as far running the rod all the way through. Someone also mentioned welding a plate to the rod and lag-bolting the plate to the beam. That was actually my first suggestion to the client which got nixed because it wasn t “clean enough” to suit them.

The “Premium” and epoxy are all great suggestions and I ll keep that in mind for the future. However, my “why didn t I think of that” moment came when I read squazo s comment “weld a lag bolt to it”. Of course! What I ll do it exactly that—weld a pretty good size lag bolt to the end of the rod. I ll drill a 3/4” hole in the beam about 2” deep and then drill a pilot hole for the lag bolt another 2” deeper. Then run the rod in the hole and screw in the lag bolt with a pipe wrench on the sucker rod.

That solution will be super clean, simple, strong enough, fast and cheap. Rarely do I think of a solutions that meets all those criteria on my own. You guys have been a world of help. Thanks.

- Offbottom


For that matter, UNC threads on the sucker rod and a properly sized hole will allow you to screw it in the same way and avoid the welding part. If you don’t get the lag bolt perfectly centered, it may give you some gaps after you screw it into the beam.

-- Darrel

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6026 posts in 4330 days


#14 posted 04-21-2021 03:50 AM

You could also use a hanger bolt; Machine thread on one end and a wood thread on the other end. Drill and tap on the end of the 3/4” rod for the hanger bolt and screw the wood end into the 3/4” hole in the wood.

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