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Miter Gauge or sled???

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Forum topic by Jgoldy posted 04-15-2021 03:09 PM 472 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jgoldy

7 posts in 224 days


04-15-2021 03:09 PM

Second post of the day, I am on a roll!

So when I purchase my new cabinet saw should I make a sliding sled or does a miter gauge do the same thing? The Jessem miter gauge looks really nice. Just wondering if you can use hold downs with the Jessem? Be great to hear feedback on this. thank you


19 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2651 posts in 1669 days


#1 posted 04-15-2021 03:20 PM

Incra TS-LS rip fence and M1000 miter gauge with Shop Stop will be the best investment/upgrade you can make to the saw. Even better than a DRO.


M1000 miter gauge detail.

While you’re at it pick up a couple of their marking T-rules.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2107 posts in 683 days


#2 posted 04-15-2021 03:22 PM

I haven’t made a new one for my new saw but I love a nice sled to support my workpiece.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2985 posts in 4524 days


#3 posted 04-15-2021 03:38 PM

I haven’t seen any reports (or maybe I haven’t looked for them) on the new high end miter gages but the price is discouraging when I can make a nice sled for a lot cheaper. The older style gages work fine for quick cut offs that don’t have to be picture frame perfect. I have one that has a clamp built into the handle that works well.

-- Les B, Oregon

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5122 posts in 2304 days


#4 posted 04-15-2021 03:39 PM

You are always served well with a nice sled, build your own! Perfect for larger panels too big for a miter and versatile for many saw operations at 90 degrees. Alternatives can be made for other angles, etc.

A quality miter gauge is a must have tool IMO.

View RClark's profile

RClark

126 posts in 3266 days


#5 posted 04-15-2021 03:41 PM

In my view, you need both.

I have an Incra 1000SE; love it.

I also have a large sled because there are operations that are easier with a sled.

Sleds can be configured for so many useful purposes and as already stated, they can handle wide/long pieces that become awkward when using the mitre gauge alone. I find that making many repetitive cuts on the sled is much quicker that when I’m using my Incra.

Specialty sleds also come into play in specific operations. For example, box joint sleds can be customized for specific widths and can be made so that they accommodate quick changeover between regular cuts and box joint operations.

-- Ray

View Jgoldy's profile

Jgoldy

7 posts in 224 days


#6 posted 04-15-2021 04:02 PM

I am guessing I can find sled plans on line thx

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2107 posts in 683 days


#7 posted 04-15-2021 04:10 PM



I am guessing I can find sled plans on line thx

- Jgoldy


I looked at a lot of YouTube videos and decided there is not much to it and made one out of scrap I had in the shop. My rule of “thumb” is to make the area where the blade exits the rear of the sled very awkward to get a finger anywhere near. For me it becomes a unique design element.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6565 posts in 3390 days


#8 posted 04-15-2021 04:13 PM



In my view, you need both.

I have an Incra 1000SE; love it.

I also have a large sled because there are operations that are easier with a sled.

Sleds can be configured for so many useful purposes and as already stated, they can handle wide/long pieces that become awkward when using the mitre gauge alone. I find that making many repetitive cuts on the sled is much quicker that when I m using my Incra.

Specialty sleds also come into play in specific operations. For example, box joint sleds can be customized for specific widths and can be made so that they accommodate quick changeover between regular cuts and box joint operations.

- RClark


^This

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View MPython's profile

MPython

358 posts in 894 days


#9 posted 04-15-2021 04:18 PM

I have a Jessem miter gauge. I like it better than any other miter gauge I’ve ever used. I also have two sleds that I use for almost all crosscuts, a small one that handles most crosscuts and a large one for wide panels. The small one lives on my saw table and I use it every day. I prefer sleds because the workpiece rides on and is supported by the sled as it moves through the cut. I use my miter gauge for angle cuts because it is broadly adjustable for various angles. You can get along just fine with a good miter gauge; but sleds are easy and inexpensive to make, so you can add one or more in the future at your convenience.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4449 posts in 3429 days


#10 posted 04-15-2021 04:24 PM

I have a JessEm miter gauge. It is quite good. I wrote a review of it. I think Splinter might have one as well. At any rate, here is at least one other review out there on it. Harvey appears to have a really nice miter gauge as well. As Mark mentioned, Incra has a good one too. One item to keep in mind, many of the high end miter gauges may have longer lead times due to the ongoing Covid mess. IMO – get a good miter gauge, it is worth the extra $$. Take some time to read thru reviews and ask plenty of questions.

+1 on making sleds as needed and having a good miter gauge.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1548 posts in 1205 days


#11 posted 04-15-2021 04:41 PM

Both… Buy the gauge and make the sleds. I like my miter gauges (I have a few). I will sometimes use a miter guage so the fence is just on one side of the blade but I will use a wooden sacrificial fence (just a jointed board). The sacrificial fence can be cut by the blade like a zero clearance insert so you minimize tear out on the workpiece and it has support on both sides of the blades. Easy enough to use a clamp and a block of wood on a sacrificial fence for a stop.

If I am doing small parts or odd angles I prefer using a sled to carry both pieces through the cut. It is easy to screw down blocks or hold down clamps onto the sled if needed.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7678 posts in 1655 days


#12 posted 04-15-2021 06:15 PM

Brand new saw, great, enjoy it.

Regardless you will benefit from a great miter gauge. I would suggest either an Osborne E3, or the Kreg miter gauge for a ready to go out of the box gauge that will serve you well.

Are you also brand new to woodworking? If so start making jigs to use on the new TS. Sacrificial fence is really just a flat board, but make some push sticks, and such to get into it a bit, then when you are feeling like you are able to make consistent straight cuts to an exact size, make your sled. Then you can make spline jigs, and a variety of other jigs to improve your capabilities with your TS.

Sleds need to be almost perfect, for you to enjoy the many benefits they can offer, but once you have a good sled, you will never be without one.

Enjoy the journey.

-- Think safe, be safe

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1865 posts in 2730 days


#13 posted 04-15-2021 06:29 PM

Gauge or sled?

Well no. GaugeS and sledS

I have the Osborn gauge and like it ,though bulky to hang on the hook.
Small sled with T-track. deep sled, long sled, 45 sled, panel sled, tenon sled…

The more you can do on a sled, likely the safer.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4556 posts in 2562 days


#14 posted 04-15-2021 06:33 PM

Had an Incra, sent it back b/c I didn’t like the indexed stop block, plus there is no left to right tape for the extension.

I have an older model Jessem – doesn’t hold 90 you have to continually check it. Newer ones are probably better.

Osborne will be my next one.

A sled is indispensable for me as well as a panel cutting sled.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Jgoldy's profile

Jgoldy

7 posts in 224 days


#15 posted 04-16-2021 03:03 AM



Brand new saw, great, enjoy it.

Regardless you will benefit from a great miter gauge. I would suggest either an Osborne E3, or the Kreg miter gauge for a ready to go out of the box gauge that will serve you well.

Are you also brand new to woodworking? If so start making jigs to use on the new TS. Sacrificial fence is really just a flat board, but make some push sticks, and such to get into it a bit, then when you are feeling like you are able to make consistent straight cuts to an exact size, make your sled. Then you can make spline jigs, and a variety of other jigs to improve your capabilities with your TS.

Sleds need to be almost perfect, for you to enjoy the many benefits they can offer, but once you have a good sled, you will never be without one.

Enjoy the journey.

- therealSteveN

Ive been woodworking for a long time. Just getting by with small job site saw and want to do more with table saw. Saw stop safety really is great and I feel like table saw can do a lot

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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