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installing paddle switch on mid 80s PM66?

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Forum topic by Winny94 posted 04-15-2021 04:27 AM 308 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Winny94

56 posts in 1528 days


04-15-2021 04:27 AM

Starting to reassemble a 1984 PM66 (replaced bearings, new paint, new hardware, etc). I’d like to install a paddle switch, but I’m a bit lost on where to begin. The current switch box looks a bit overwhelming as I have very little experience wiring 230V tools.
Any advice? What switch to buy, etc?
Motor is a Marathon 3HP single phase 230V


And if anyone is curious, here are a few shots of the rehab










9 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

8566 posts in 3285 days


#1 posted 04-15-2021 04:58 AM

You have a NEMA starter now with its own built in start/stop buttons… are you wanting to know how to hook that up, or do you want to add an additional switch to the machine? Either way, can you post a better picture of the wiring diagram?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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CaptainKlutz

4456 posts in 2581 days


#2 posted 04-15-2021 10:16 AM

+1 That starter has built-in power switches. Don’t need to any another.

+1 The instructions for wiring everything is located inside the lid? Need better picture.

Zoomed in, can see it shows wiring instructions for external switches; though I can not read details.

Paddle switches are modern feature on < 2HP motors. Most paddle switches are latched on/off switch.
Would use external switch wiring connections in the Blue box for paddle switch. Referencing the connection numbers in the large red box. This is not safest way to control a motor starter, but can be used.

Most common method of wiring external start/stop to a motor starter uses momentary switches. Momentary 3-wire external switch wiring is small red box. This is how the existing front panel switches are connected.

I like to use momentary rotate lock mushroom button, instead of paddle switch on my saw. The chinesium version is here and HD Industrial version is here. Though you can buy the box, and switches separately cheaper than buying a finished industrial grade switch assembly.

Control stations are very common. Can find all kinds of used solutions to match vintage look of your PM66 if that is important. You can also find project posts where users have made a wooden paddle that engages existing switches too.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2431 posts in 3880 days


#3 posted 04-15-2021 01:50 PM

I would put a maintained contact paddle switch in series with the stop button. Place it where it is easily accessible to your knee or where it will work best for you for a quick shutdown. The paddle switch will not start the saw, only stop it. Use the original start buttons for normal operation. I do that on my tools with mag starters. Easy off, and a two step operation to start, making it safer, but a bit of getting used to it. You could also use a momentary paddle switch, also in series with the existing stop, and that would eliminate the double action to start, and both are safe ways to do it.

View clagwell's profile

clagwell

369 posts in 879 days


#4 posted 04-16-2021 10:05 AM

I agree with the consensus, keep you existing switch and make modifications on the control side. I like the Klutz mushroom.

Be aware that the overload protection for the motor is a part of the motor control in the box. If you replace the whole thing with an aftermarket switch you lose an important safety feature.

Oh, and when you’re looking at a paddle switche compare the size of it’s terminals to those big lugs in the OEM switch and think about starting current. For your motor that’s between 73 and 82 Amp.

Nice restoration, btw.

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

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CaptainKlutz

4456 posts in 2581 days


#5 posted 04-16-2021 11:38 AM

+1 ibewjon idea on just adding a safety stop switch.

In my past machine building life; common solution for a large e-stop switch at knee level, was a called a palm switch or foot button switches.

They are almost 3.5” OD, and tolerate off angle pressure well.

Several mfg make them. Can find solid metal boxes & switches sold as foot switch, or more common plastic red domed palm e-stop switch. Eaton/Moeller FAK style are popular. Good safety switches are not inexpensive, unless you shop fleabay for direct shipments from China.

These palm switches are still expensive compared to a 22mm momentary push button, or one already mounted in box, and wooden flap covering the button?

Many choices available…..

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1872 posts in 2736 days


#6 posted 04-16-2021 12:32 PM

Do not confuse a paddle switch with a magnetic switch that happens to be a paddle or big mushroom. I suggest a magnetic switch for safety reasons on any tool that if powered up unattended could be dangerous. Many have breakers in them too. They have to be matched to the load. Read the specs. As suggested, a good one is not cheap.

What is wrong with your existing switch?

You can also get switches are replacement parts from the usual suspects, Griz, Jet, Harvey etc.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2431 posts in 3880 days


#7 posted 04-16-2021 01:28 PM

I see the problem as not being easy to access for a quick shutdown. The paddle switch added to the existing stop circuit is an easy safety upgrade. Do not remove the magnetic starter, it is there to protect the motor.

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

56 posts in 1528 days


#8 posted 04-16-2021 03:01 PM



Do not confuse a paddle switch with a magnetic switch that happens to be a paddle or big mushroom. I suggest a magnetic switch for safety reasons on any tool that if powered up unattended could be dangerous. Many have breakers in them too. They have to be matched to the load. Read the specs. As suggested, a good one is not cheap.

What is wrong with your existing switch?

You can also get switches are replacement parts from the usual suspects, Griz, Jet, Harvey etc.

- tvrgeek

I wouldn’t say anything is “wrong” with it, it’s just a small, recessed button that could be safer.

After reading and looking at prices, im leaning towards fabricating my own paddle cover and leaving everything else as is

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ibewjon

2431 posts in 3880 days


#9 posted 04-16-2021 03:10 PM

You don’t need a high amp paddle switch if it is installed in the stop circuit. That carries minimal amperage. A purchased switch will be safer than a hit or miss cover to operate the recessed stop button.

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