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what do you think these marks are?

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Forum topic by Frankfort posted 04-10-2021 04:57 AM 553 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


04-10-2021 04:57 AM

Testing out different finishes on scrap pieces of wood.

Pretty sure this is pine.

I was playing around with different mixtures of tung. This piece has pure tung mixed with minwax “tung”.

Then these marks popped up after the first wipe down of clear satin wipe on poly.

Is this grain? Scratches that didn’t get sanded out? Something else?

I built a tray with the leftover pieces which I’ll also attach. I kinda like it. So if i can’t prevent these from popping up when I poly the tray I may leave that step out. It’d bug me every time I looked at it.

Thoughts?

Thanks!


11 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2673 posts in 1675 days


#1 posted 04-10-2021 07:09 AM

Might be fir. Fir is redder and sappy.

Neither pine nor fir take stain particularly well. The ring structure has essentially sealed areas between the porous rings. You get uneven absorption on the hard area in contrast to the dark softer areas.

I see flashes of dark running with the grain. These can be caused by wind damage as the tree was growing. As it bent and flexed it cracked a little. The tree back filled the gaps with sap. These may not be noticeable until finishing time.

Lots of other causes and fixes. There are more finishing schedules than there are finishers. All are the “best” to whomever is finishing at the time.

YMMV

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1907 days


#2 posted 04-10-2021 09:48 AM

Welcome to LJ F’fort...

The only happy finish are the residents of Finland... though many may say it’s the expatriats that are the happiest.

I’m way out of my pay-grade here, but even not knowing your background, are you being a tad too adventurous ”playing around with different mixtures of tung”... the chemists of Cabbots, Feast Watwon and Min-WaX might relate on an appropriate shekel level.

Exach species of timber will react differently and then when you introduce glue squeeze out, sanding grit, type of sandpaper, workshop chemicals, spilled coffee and the dropped pizza… it is impossible to predict final result.

My advice is (again I mention I’m low pay grade), try on a scrap and if you like it, go with it and if you don’t like it’s probably too late anyway and wear the result as a learning curve.

Each reply to your query will provide their own spin usually based on individual experience (hell, most of us are too proud to listen to others), however, if you are not in their same workshop environment… c’mon you fill in the blanks …..

Nevertheless, absorb all the suggestions and hope you will be no more confused than you were before Mm2’s comment…. advice is great and you’ll get some great advice here… unfortunately picking the ones that suit will be the challenge.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View MPython's profile

MPython

358 posts in 899 days


#3 posted 04-10-2021 10:55 AM

Madmark2 nailed it. It follows the grain and appears to be stress damage (called “shake”). Can be caused by lots of things, wind, trauma to the tree when it was felled, or anything else that impacts the tree or causes it to flex violently. It doesn’t appear to be bad in your board, but sometimes it’s bad enough to render a board useless. I don’t think it’s damage caused by sanding.

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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


#4 posted 04-10-2021 03:37 PM


Welcome to LJ F fort... are you being a tad too adventurous ”playing around with different mixtures of tung”... the chemists of Cabbots, Feast Watwon and Min-WaX might relate on an appropriate shekel level.

Exach species of timber will react differently and then when you introduce glue squeeze out, sanding grit, type of sandpaper, workshop chemicals, spilled coffee and the dropped pizza… it is impossible to predict final result.

- LittleBlackDuck

Can you be a little more specific, are you saying it’s dangerous to mix the two? Or are you saying i might end up with rings from pop cans on my TV tray?

Both of those ⬆️ fit the description of what you’re saying. Both are on different ends of a spectrum, know what I mean?

Just trying to be safe here since I know so little.

And thanks!

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2673 posts in 1675 days


#5 posted 04-10-2021 03:58 PM

LBD is from down under. As such his views are often a little … inverted! LOL

If LBD was warning of the explosive properties of tung oil he’d be clear in his meaning. If he’s being obtuse then check to see who’s pulling on your pantaloons!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


#6 posted 04-10-2021 04:23 PM



LBD is from down under. As such his views are often a little … inverted! LOL

If LBD was warning of the explosive properties of tung oil he d be clear in his meaning. If he s being obtuse then check to see who s pulling on your pantaloons!

- Madmark2

Lol. Thanks!

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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


#7 posted 04-10-2021 04:30 PM


Might be fir. Fir is redder and sappy.

I see flashes of dark running with the grain. These can be caused by wind damage as the tree was growing. As it bent and flexed it cracked a little. The tree back filled the gaps with sap. These may not be noticeable until finishing time.

Lots of other causes and fixes. There are more finishing schedules than there are finishers. All are the “best” to whomever is finishing at the time.

YMMV

- Madmark2

Thx. What do think could prevent that, assuming you were starting from scratch, and not trying to fix a jacked up project?

Also thanks to everyone who replied, I haven’t found the like button yet. I know some forums leave it out to encourage thoughtful discussion.

The same marks are all over the tray so I’m leaning towards just leaving it with oil on it and no poly.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1907 days


#8 posted 04-11-2021 03:34 AM



Can you be a little more specific, are you saying it s dangerous to mix the two? Or are you saying i might end up with rings from pop cans on my TV tray?

Just trying to be safe here since I know so little.
- Frankfort


Sorry Ff... I suppose I was being a tad sarcastic… implying you were new to woodworking and you’re already playing around with mixing oils…

However, while we’re on the subject of safety… tung oil (and a few others) is known for it’s combustibility in discarded rags… fortunately I haven’t experienced it, but has been often discussed here at LJ.

Just my inflation driven (and plunging Aussie$) $3.78¢ worth.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


#9 posted 04-11-2021 03:57 AM


Can you be a little more specific, are you saying it s dangerous to mix the two? Or are you saying i might end up with rings from pop cans on my TV tray?

Just trying to be safe here since I know so little.
- Frankfort

Sorry Ff... I suppose I was being a tad sarcastic… implying you were new to woodworking and you re already playing around with mixing oils…

However, while we re on the subject of safety… tung oil (and a few others) is known for it s combustibility in discarded rags… fortunately I haven t experienced it, but has been often discussed here at LJ.

Just my inflation driven (and plunging Aussie$) $3.78¢ worth.

- LittleBlackDuck

Oh! Lol, I gotcha. Thx.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26214 posts in 4192 days


#10 posted 04-11-2021 12:19 PM

If you are just trying to finish it and not stain it, have you tried a shellac sealer on it first? Shellac is a good primer for any finish. It may or may not let these streaks come through!!...my 2 cents worth…........Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Frankfort

32 posts in 51 days


#11 posted 04-11-2021 09:09 PM



If you are just trying to finish it and not stain it, have you tried a shellac sealer on it first? Shellac is a good primer for any finish. It may or may not let these streaks come through!!...my 2 cents worth…........Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Thank you!

To answer your question:

Excluding the test pieces ⬆️⬆️⬆️, so I’m only talking about the tray now:

There is pure tung on the tray, that’s it.

I wasn’t planning on staining it, I kinda like the look & color of the tung (plus I’ve noticed this wood darkens over time for some reason).

I was looking for a topcoat to protect it because I just had to sand out marks from a drink and re-oil it (which means I’ve got some time to think about it).

But yea, I’m not too keen on those marks on the test pieces.

And yea, I have some Shellac but never used it. I’ll try some on a test piece.

Also, now that the tung is on it, that means I shouldn’t try a sealer, correct?

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