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Forum topic by Calaplis posted 04-08-2021 09:12 PM 487 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Calaplis

2 posts in 11 days


04-08-2021 09:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: kitchen cabinets doors lumber maple

Hi all!

I’m new in the woodworking world and I started my DIY project at home. I wanted to renovate the kitchen cabinet doors but I’m having issues with lumber. I’ve made a couple of doors but because I only a have table saw and I’m using the lumber from homedepot some of them are warped. Any suggestion about how to work with straight lumber for this?

I really appreciate any advise on this!

Thanks.


15 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2524 posts in 1647 days


#1 posted 04-08-2021 10:27 PM

Try and hand select your lumber instead of having them do it. Sight the corners to find the straightest.

Gentle warp can be mitigated automatically as the pieces are crosscut. Severe warp not so much.

One thing is clear, you need MORE TOOLS! LOL

You can tell your better half it’s OK ‘cause I said so.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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SMP

3826 posts in 964 days


#2 posted 04-08-2021 10:34 PM

First, go to the tool section and grab an 8’ box level, the most expensive they have. Bring that with you to find the straightest boards. The poplar at the big box store is usually decent, but I still have to sift through and am lucky to find 25-50% of the straight enough.

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Woodmaster1

1709 posts in 3645 days


#3 posted 04-08-2021 11:37 PM

Big box hardwood is too expensive. Find a good hardwood dealer. The lumber I get from them is really straight usually no issues with their lumber when you sort for the best looking.

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Calaplis

2 posts in 11 days


#4 posted 04-09-2021 12:03 AM

Thank you guys for the advice! I will definitely go the a local hardware dealer to see if I can find better ones. I started using poplar but I found that it dented easily so now I’m using Maple (but it is expensive) so I don’t want to ruin them.

I definitely need more tools! but you know the deal, slowly but surely.

Cheers!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6483 posts in 3368 days


#5 posted 04-09-2021 12:12 AM

Could you explain your operation? At this point I envision you are taking lumber home from a store, cut it to length need and edge gluing into panels which will be cabinet doors.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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BurlyBob

8740 posts in 3324 days


#6 posted 04-09-2021 12:13 AM

I’ve got a friend who is the finest cabinet maker in my area. I trust his advice and I’ve seen his results.

1st- Are you doing natural wood or painted?
2nd- Raised panel or flat.

My friend prefers Beech for raised panel painted and just about any other painted cabinets. Why? it’s cost effective, super easy to work with and holds paint extremely well.

I don’t care for any sort of painted anything. But I do enjoy using beech. It’s a much under appreciated wood.

For natural wood, don’t stain, get the real thing. The real thing is way better that a fake stain job.

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AlaskaGuy

6483 posts in 3368 days


#7 posted 04-09-2021 12:44 AM



I ve got a friend who is the finest cabinet maker in my area. I trust his advice and I ve seen his results.

1st- Are you doing natural wood or painted?
2nd- Raised panel or flat.

My friend prefers Beech for raised panel painted and just about any other painted cabinets. Why? it s cost effective, super easy to work with and holds paint extremely well.

I don t care for any sort of painted anything. But I do enjoy using beech. It s a much under appreciated wood.

For natural wood, don t stain, get the real thing. The real thing is way better that a fake stain job.

- BurlyBob


It sound to me like he is doing Solid wood Slab Doors. Risky business if you asked me. Risky meaning getting a whole kitchen done without at least some doors warping. In the past there have been a lot of discussions on the WoodWeb cabinet making forum on Solid wood Slab doors. Many refuse to make them or won’t warranty them against warping.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Robert's profile

Robert

4524 posts in 2539 days


#8 posted 04-09-2021 11:04 AM

You need to tell us what style of door you’re making.

But, since its poplar, now maple, my assumption is its painted. And since you’ve only got a table saw, I would assume flat panels. Use MDF or plywood. There is no reason to use solid wood panels.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1788 posts in 2708 days


#9 posted 04-09-2021 11:24 AM



First, go to the tool section and grab an 8’ box level, the most expensive they have. Bring that with you to find the straightest boards. The poplar at the big box store is usually decent, but I still have to sift through and am lucky to find 25-50% of the straight enough.

- SMP


I find the cheapest level from Horrible Freight to be just fine. Just verify the level set in the store ( bubble reads the same end for end) Fancy wood and brass does not make a better level.

Recently, the selection at least at our local HD look more like 2×4’s that have been left in the weather. More suitable for modern sculpture. Possiblly unstable weather leading to it. Sooooo. Lux head came yesterday for my new/used planer.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6781 posts in 1648 days


#10 posted 04-09-2021 01:16 PM


First, go to the tool section and grab an 8’ box level, the most expensive they have. Bring that with you to find the straightest boards. The poplar at the big box store is usually decent, but I still have to sift through and am lucky to find 25-50% of the straight enough.

- SMP

I find the cheapest level from Horrible Freight to be just fine. Just verify the level set in the store ( bubble reads the same end for end) Fancy wood and brass does not make a better level.

- tvrgeek

I’m pretty sure he meant to take a level from the tool section over to the lumber to use as a straightedge to check boards along their length, not purchase one. Besides, why would it matter if it was an accurate level?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6483 posts in 3368 days


#11 posted 04-09-2021 02:57 PM

.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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woodbutcherbynight

8861 posts in 3467 days


#12 posted 04-10-2021 04:06 AM


I m pretty sure he meant to take a level from the tool section over to the lumber to use as a straightedge to check boards along their length, not purchase one. Besides, why would it matter if it was an accurate level?

- Rich

I have seen someone do this, but they didn’t remove the tie at one end they put on it. Was laughing so hard I couldn’t explain it to the guy and not sound like a idiot.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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tvrgeek

1788 posts in 2708 days


#13 posted 04-10-2021 11:15 AM

Apologize for stealing this thread, but the very same topic. My kitchen has painted doors. One, tall door about 36 inches, glass center, is warped. I am going to make a new one, just don’t know what the most stable wood would be. I was thinking denser than poplar. Maple maybe? I guess I could laminate thinner stock.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4524 posts in 2539 days


#14 posted 04-10-2021 11:38 AM

Soft maple kiln dried is very stable. I pay the extra and get 15/16.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6483 posts in 3368 days


#15 posted 04-10-2021 10:46 PM

These people say

Image result for most stable wood
Douglas fir
Wood shrinks and swells at a cellular level until it reaches equilibrium; this is known as “seasoning.” Douglas fir, or simply “fir” as it is typically referred to, is the most stable wood on a cellular level because once it is seasoned, it virtually stops shrinking or warping.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/stable-wood-against-warping-shrinking-99470.html

https://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/ten-best-woods-youve-never-heard/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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