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Forum topic by woodman71 posted 04-06-2021 12:13 AM 880 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodman71

199 posts in 4411 days


04-06-2021 12:13 AM

Do any of you guys remember have to watch this film in shop class. I had to when i was in high school graduate in 1989. Take look and let me know what you think.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxw5gl1Z2Yk


28 replies so far

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SMP

4002 posts in 993 days


#1 posted 04-06-2021 12:21 AM

Nope, can’t remember having to watch that in Jr High or HS shop classes. Though maybe we should have as one guy almost cut off his thumb on the bandsaw. And in HS metal shop a high speed mill bit flew off and bounced around the room like a ricocheting bullet in a western movie.

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Madmark2

2685 posts in 1676 days


#2 posted 04-06-2021 12:39 AM

I had to stop watching at the jointer ...

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Woodmaster1

1737 posts in 3674 days


#3 posted 04-06-2021 03:33 AM

I used to use a dowel rod with red paint on the end and show the students how fast and much they could lose in a second on the jointer. Tablesaw kickback all I did was point to the dent in the block.

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fivecodys

1736 posts in 2724 days


#4 posted 04-06-2021 03:25 PM

When I was in high school our 8-1/2 fingered shop teacher showed us a similar film.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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Novamr99

40 posts in 221 days


#5 posted 04-06-2021 04:08 PM

Yes, I did watch that film. Graduated ‘79 in Houston. It was old then but made its point to the delicate mind of this long-haired hippy type P.F.(those unfamiliar with “P.F.” see Charlie Daniels, “The Ballad of Uneasy Rider” 1973.)
At the time, rules didn’t apply to me, but I sure took machine safety to heart, as I wanted to keep my fingers intact so I could play guitar.
Now after being a machinist since 1980, my digits are all still intact with only minor lacerations over the years (100% of them MY fault), I watch this again in absolute horror as an entire shop, supervisor included, spend their days with naked eyeballs exposed to any and all flying debris provided by an unholy army of powered machinery.
That’s right folks. NOBODY was wearing safety glasses!
Hope they don’t have to learn to operate those machines by Braille.
BTW I’ve been in shops so long that I feel uncomfortable going into hardware stores without safety glasses on. Just being in proximity to all those tools without PPE just seems unnatural. (I’ll say it first, “OK Boomer.”)

-- That's not an optical illusion, it just looks like one.

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Madmark2

2685 posts in 1676 days


#6 posted 04-06-2021 04:43 PM

Was teaching woodworking 101 at Woodcraft and the first item on the lesson plan is the woodworker’s secret handshake — wave both hands over head and say “I’m a woodworker and I have all ten!” Imagine my surprise when a guy in the back raises 8-1/2!

Seems he had bought his first table saw and without any instruction decided to splay his hand out like a starfish to push a board thru the saw and promptly cut off his thumb and half his index finger.

He said he wanted to learn safety before he tried his SECOND cut!

Another class:
We were videoing the class. I discuss push block use and demonstrate short rip using same. Each student repeats operation with their short chunk. All goes swimmingly.

Later on in Post we’re reviewing the vid and to my total amazement none of the students used the push block, preferring the “thumb tucked under the palm and pinkie over the fence” technique I had demonstrated previously.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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RCRAW

12 posts in 683 days


#7 posted 04-06-2021 11:33 PM

I taught HS & Jr.HS woodworking for 34 years and used such films to help with the lectures so students could see what I was talking about. (hard to see a machine when 20 students are standing around) Helped when a student sued the school when he removed his right thumb at the table saw after doing what he was shown what not to do.

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RClark

128 posts in 3272 days


#8 posted 04-07-2021 12:29 AM

I didn’t take wood shop in high school. I took metal shop 1974-1976. No safety film.

The popular project when I was there was turning a functional brass cannon on the metal lathe. At the end of the semester, the shop teacher took us out to a field so we could fire them. .50 cal ball and black powder.

I’m guessing we would never have seen a safety film for that one.

-- Ray

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2Goober

43 posts in 690 days


#9 posted 04-07-2021 12:41 AM

I can’t say that I remember any shop safety films. I graduated in 1975, took shop in jr and high school. Teachers were a LOT different back then. Lots of demonstrations of sticking wood into various cutters and pointing out dents and holes in the walls. Man, I sure do have a lot of fond memories of my shop teachers.

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Woodmaster1

1737 posts in 3674 days


#10 posted 04-07-2021 01:31 AM



I taught HS & Jr.HS woodworking for 34 years and used such films to help with the lectures so students could see what I was talking about. (hard to see a machine when 20 students are standing around) Helped when a student sued the school when he removed his right thumb at the table saw after doing what he was shown what not to do.

- RCRAW


Wow only 20 students. My 1st year teaching woodworking I had 35 students talk about baptism by fire. I survived and so did the students. I was dumb enough to do it for 40yrs and loved every minute.

I didn t take wood shop in high school. I took metal shop 1974-1976. No safety film.

The popular project when I was there was turning a functional brass cannon on the metal lathe. At the end of the semester, the shop teacher took us out to a field so we could fire them. .50 cal ball and black powder.

I m guessing we would never have seen a safety film for that one.

- RClark

I had my machine shop students do a canon as well. I just didn’t have them drill the hole very deep because I know one of the would have blown themselves up.

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pottz

16964 posts in 2072 days


#11 posted 04-07-2021 02:00 AM

only took the first quarter of wood shop too boring,i had better tools at home so went in metal shop up to advanced.no safety films at all,dont even remember much safety equipment,not even safety glasses.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Madmark2

2685 posts in 1676 days


#12 posted 04-07-2021 02:16 AM

I went to a TOUGH high school!

Chorus: How tough was it?

It was soooo tough that instead of auto shop we had auto theft!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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pottz

16964 posts in 2072 days


#13 posted 04-07-2021 02:47 AM



I went to a TOUGH high school!

Chorus: How tough was it?

It was soooo tough that instead of auto shop we had auto theft!

- Madmark2


me too gardena high in socal one of the five worst h.s. in la unified,these days they have a full time police presense of 3 full time officers.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Novamr99's profile

Novamr99

40 posts in 221 days


#14 posted 04-07-2021 03:38 AM

My high school was tough but poor. We couldn’t afford guns so we had to insert the bullets manually.

-- That's not an optical illusion, it just looks like one.

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pottz

16964 posts in 2072 days


#15 posted 04-07-2021 04:00 AM



My high school was tough but poor. We couldn t afford guns so we had to insert the bullets manually.

- Novamr99


good one.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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