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Suggestions/advice for replacing an old Ryobi BT-3000 10" table saw

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Forum topic by Erikburd posted 04-03-2021 10:35 PM 994 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Erikburd

4 posts in 45 days


04-03-2021 10:35 PM

I own a very old Ryobi BT-3000 10” table saw (from my dad), which has been a great workhorse over the years. I use the table saw mostly for small/medium sized DIY and woodworking projects.

I’m looking to replace it with a new 10” table saw and was looking at potential models to replace it, and was wondering what people’s experiences have been with them (the good, bad, and ugly). This will be in a garage and will be mostly set on an existing portable bench. These were the models I’ve been looking at:
1) DWE7491
2) Hitachi/Metabo C10RJ
3) Bosch 4100XC-10
4) Delta 36-6023 or 36-725 T2 (I’ve been reading about motor issues with Delta; is this still a problem?)

I’ve been leaning towards the Dewalt and Hitachi, but the Delta models seem to be good from what I’ve been reading. Any suggestions/advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks.


9 replies so far

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

137 posts in 106 days


#1 posted 04-04-2021 06:44 AM

I recently replaced a Ryobi BTS10. Went with the Delta 36-725T2. Probably biased because I own one, but it’s hands down the best saw from the above options. And arguably the best saw in its class.

There’s a pretty active Facebook group devoted to the 725 series of saws. Great resource. Which is a nice bonus to have such an active base of owners to bounce ideas off of.

Yes, I also heard of some motor issues. But, they seem to be largely overblown. And, allegedly Delta had made some type of revision a year or so ago. If you’re really worried about it, one of the guys in the FB group sells an upgrade kit. Includes some beefier start/run capacitors, more robust blade break, etc. But, I’ll personally be skipping it. And will only think about adding it if my saw fails, and Delta’s 5 year warranty for some reason won’t cover it.

It’s a lot of saw for the money. Biggest legitimate issue you’ll have with it is finding one in stock at the moment.

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LittleShaver

753 posts in 1707 days


#2 posted 04-04-2021 01:05 PM

I had a BT 3000 for over 25 years. When it finally bit the dust, I went with the Delta 725. Great saw. I have put all kinds of stuff through it without a problem. I think it’s a great saw for the money and for the hobbyist. You will have to thin down the riving knife if you use thin kerf blades like I do.

-- Sawdust Maker

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Erikburd

4 posts in 45 days


#3 posted 04-04-2021 04:50 PM

@Wood_Scraps – Thank you for your input. It looks like a lot of people really like that Delta saw, especially the fence. Seems to be a pretty good replacement.

@LittleShaver – Just curious about thin kerf blades. I have a thin kerf Freud 24T blade installed. How much did you have to shave the riving knife to make it work? I’ve been seeing some posts here and elsewhere saying you can use thin kerf blades, while some say no (as stated in the manual).

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dbw

548 posts in 2724 days


#4 posted 04-04-2021 06:05 PM

I will tell you what I tell everybody looking to replace their saw. Get a SawStop. It’s more $ but it is a very good saw. I’m very happy with mine. It replaced a 20 year old Jet Contractor Saw.

-- Woodworking is like a vicious cycle. The more tools you buy the more you find to buy.

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Erikburd

4 posts in 45 days


#5 posted 04-04-2021 06:14 PM

Yeah – I looked at the SawStop but it’s a bit out of my budget. Nice saw for sure, people love it, but not an option for me.

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tvrgeek

1875 posts in 2737 days


#6 posted 04-04-2021 06:39 PM

The riving knife needs to be thinner than the blade kerf but preferably as thick as the blade blank. Look at the specs for the correct answer. I would imagine all the benchtop and job site saws have thin kerf knives. A thin knife and a thick blade is maybe not as perfect, but I offer them to be a 99% fix. It only has to keep that back tooth from getting a good grab. I never had a kickback with the thin MJ splitter and full kerf blades.

My Ridgid contractor had a thin enough splitter. I usually ran an MJ splitter anyway. My new Harvey knife is suitable for full kerf only. But with 3 HP, I will now only run full kerf. If I had a portable or contractor (underpowered) I would absolutely get a thin knife and run thin blades. My Ridgid really struggled with a combo full kerf, but a 60T thin crosscut and 24 tooth thin rip worked just fine.

I woudl suggest trying to mill down a thick knife to thin is not a practical DIY operation. I am sure it is possible, but just not practical.

Think harder about the total cost of ownership and risk for the SawStop. I did not as I jig almost everything and use my BS for more of the smaller things that were most dangerous on the TS. I believe the riving knife to be th biggest safety improvement, so I decided on the risk of a conventional saw.

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

137 posts in 106 days


#7 posted 04-04-2021 08:58 PM


@Wood_Scraps – Thank you for your input. It looks like a lot of people really like that Delta saw, especially the fence. Seems to be a pretty good replacement.

@LittleShaver – Just curious about thin kerf blades. I have a thin kerf Freud 24T blade installed. How much did you have to shave the riving knife to make it work? I ve been seeing some posts here and elsewhere saying you can use thin kerf blades, while some say no (as stated in the manual).

- Erikburd

I’ve run a Diablo thin kerf 50T blade on my 725T2 with no issues.

Will be picking up a 24T Ridge Carbide full kerf soon. Plenty of folks running full kerf blades with their 725s.

The saw has plenty of power. Which, BTW, I’d suggest putting it on a 20A circuit. Delta says 15A is fine. But it pulls a lot of juice. And the motor will be happier running on a 20A supply.

As far as the riving knife, if you want to go thinner, the same guy I mentioned who sells the capacitor upgrade kit is coming out with “pick your own thickness” riving knives in the near future.

Like I said before, the active community of 725 owners is definitely a value add.

ETA: If you are feeling adventurous, you could even just make your own thinner kerf RK out of the plate from an old saw blade. I plan to use the blade that came with the T2 for this exact purpose.

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Erikburd

4 posts in 45 days


#8 posted 04-05-2021 06:00 AM


@WoodScraps – Thank you for your input. It looks like a lot of people really like that Delta saw, especially the fence. Seems to be a pretty good replacement.

@LittleShaver – Just curious about thin kerf blades. I have a thin kerf Freud 24T blade installed. How much did you have to shave the riving knife to make it work? I ve been seeing some posts here and elsewhere saying you can use thin kerf blades, while some say no (as stated in the manual).

- Erikburd

I’ve run a Diablo thin kerf 50T blade on my 725T2 with no issues.

Will be picking up a 24T Ridge Carbide full kerf soon. Plenty of folks running full kerf blades with their 725s.

The saw has plenty of power. Which, BTW, I’d suggest putting it on a 20A circuit. Delta says 15A is fine. But it pulls a lot of juice. And the motor will be happier running on a 20A supply.

As far as the riving knife, if you want to go thinner, the same guy I mentioned who sells the capacitor upgrade kit is coming out with “pick your own thickness” riving knives in the near future.

Like I said before, the active community of 725 owners is definitely a value add.

ETA: If you are feeling adventurous, you could even just make your own thinner kerf RK out of the plate from an old saw blade. I plan to use the blade that came with the T2 for this exact purpose.

- WoodScraps

Thanks for the additional info. That helps. BTW, what’s the actual dimensions of the 725T2 when fully assembled – I was curious because I would like to make sure that it won’t cause any issues because it’s in a garage. The depth doesn’t seem to be an issue but I’m more interested in the width with the rails.

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Wood_Scraps

137 posts in 106 days


#9 posted 04-05-2021 05:30 PM


Thanks for the additional info. That helps. BTW, what s the actual dimensions of the 725T2 when fully assembled – I was curious because I would like to make sure that it won t cause any issues because it s in a garage. The depth doesn t seem to be an issue but I m more interested in the width with the rails.

- Erikburd

Rough and quick dimensions…

Top (including rail length): 63”
Base width: 36”
Depth: 32”

Hopefully that gets you what you’re needing.

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