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Forum topic by phlepper posted 04-01-2021 07:07 AM 474 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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phlepper

25 posts in 4305 days


04-01-2021 07:07 AM

So I just finished building my router cabinet:

Click for details

As you can see from this pic, I had originally intended to cut a hole in the side of the cabinet for the door to the router “box”.

Router box with dust collection hole at the back:

But since I have the router attached to a lift and I can easily remove it from the top of the table to change bits or router speed and the lift gives me the lateral adjustments:

So I don’t really see a need to create the door. As this is my first router cabinet and all the designs I’ve seen include a router door, I was wondering what those of you with more experience felt about a door. I really like the suction I get now without the door, so I’m loathe to cut into the cabinet, but don’t know what I might be missing by not having the door.

I appreciate any of your insights.

Thanks,
Paul

-- "A hammer in search of a nail..." (https://www.instagram.com/paulcanbuildthat/)


11 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1749 posts in 2701 days


#1 posted 04-01-2021 08:43 AM

Use it. If you never find a need for a door, then you have the answer. Personally, I would not want to pull the router out to change bits or speed but mine has the handles on it and is more awkward to pull up.

I had a box on mine, with a door, as my Tridon router needs me to push the lock pin to change bits. This time, I have no box, just the clip in shroud. I’ll see how it works.

View xedos's profile

xedos

249 posts in 352 days


#2 posted 04-01-2021 11:23 AM

Something you need to consider is where the makeup air is goin to come from that is removed by the vacuum in t(e dust port.

Not just from a fluid mechanics perspective, but also that big router of yours need fresh air to cool itself.

Perhaps not a door,, but you need some type of air inlet of significant size.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4520 posts in 2533 days


#3 posted 04-01-2021 12:04 PM

Xedos is correct. Quite a bit of heat can build up if you have a long session, for example

I have a door, and didn’t worry about it, but also had one router quit on me (heat?).

After I got a lift and new router motor I had to cut holes in the door for air flow. Even still, I get pockets of accumulation but the lift stays pretty clean.

Which brings up another point. For many years, like a lot of people, I collected my router table with a shop vac. It never had the capacity to collect the box, just fence. Now, I have a wall mount 1HP blower and it is like night and day. Something to consider.

Why do you have to remove the whole thing to change bits? That is really a hassle. Can’t you use an offset wrench?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

789 posts in 368 days


#4 posted 04-01-2021 02:18 PM

i have a door. I have a lift that raises the router high enough to change bits. The door allows me to clean out debris from the box and occasionally clean the lift and lube. Vacuum any debris on the router air cooling areas

-- Ron

View phlepper's profile

phlepper

25 posts in 4305 days


#5 posted 04-07-2021 10:31 PM

Thanks for the feedback!

As tvrgeek mentioned, I’ll just use it without the door and see how it works. So far, I don’t have any issues as I’m used to just pulling the router base plate and router out when changing bits. I haven’t invested in offset wrenches since it’s easier (for me) to just pull it out, sit it next to the box on the table and have full access to the router.

As for the airflow, I’ll have to see how that goes. Right now, when the dust collection is on, I’m getting good suction via the top of the table near the bit. I feel like this gives me ideal airflow over the router itself. I have the Harbor Freight DC and I directly connect it to each tool I’m using (so it is the only collecting from the router table when it is used). Overall, the router box stays pretty clear with only minimal sawdust to the right of the outlet hole (at the bottom of the box in the rear) and even less near the cord hole (at the bottom of the box on the left side).

I haven’t had long sessions with it yet; longest was cutting the grooves for the drawer bottoms on the cabinet’s 19 drawers :) So I’ll definitely keep an eye on the heat as I use it for longer sessions.

Thanks again,
Paul

-- "A hammer in search of a nail..." (https://www.instagram.com/paulcanbuildthat/)

View xedos's profile

xedos

249 posts in 352 days


#6 posted 04-08-2021 03:28 AM



Thanks for the feedback!
As for the airflow, I ll have to see how that goes. Right now, when the dust collection is on, I m getting good suction via the top of the table near the bit. I feel like this gives me ideal airflow over the router itself.

Thanks again,
Paul

- phlepper

Your feelings aren’t really the best bellwether. The motor needs replacement air to cool the windings in an amount equal to volume being sucked out by the 4” hole. The opening in the lift plate is nowhere near equal to the 4” port – and it’s competing for that makeup air with the suction created by the Incra fence port.

The system obviously works, but you’re shortening the life of your router. And since it’s a PC , and they’re outa the router business, parts and replacement motors are getting harder to come by.

View phlepper's profile

phlepper

25 posts in 4305 days


#7 posted 04-08-2021 05:28 AM

What do you all think about something like this butterfly vent? That would let me add airflow inside that would be adjustable.

If so, where would be the best place to install it? Given the 4” DC hole is in the back of the box at the bottom right, I assume it would be best to mount the vent in the front at the top right (so air is drawn across the router from right to left and from top to bottom). That would also make it adjustable from outside the cabinet, which would be convenient.

Finally, since it would be adjustable, any tips on how to determine the “optimal” opening size of the vent?

Thanks again,
Paul

-- "A hammer in search of a nail..." (https://www.instagram.com/paulcanbuildthat/)

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6920 posts in 3545 days


#8 posted 04-08-2021 10:30 AM


Your feelings aren’t really the best bellwether. The motor needs replacement air to cool the windings in an amount equal to volume being sucked out by the 4” hole. The opening in the lift plate is nowhere near equal to the 4” port – and it’s competing for that makeup air with the suction created by the Incra fence port.

- xedos

That’s worth repeating, because he is correct. You need to allow some make up air into the cabinet. Doesn’t need to be a door…but does need to be there.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View xedos's profile

xedos

249 posts in 352 days


#9 posted 04-09-2021 12:08 PM

Butterfly vent will work. You’ll need two to give you the the same cross section / flow as the 4” dust port though.

Location sounds good.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

457 posts in 649 days


#10 posted 04-09-2021 01:09 PM

I built myself a router table a few months ago and built a box for the router. I did come across a situation the other day that made me want a door… Adjusting the speed on my router.

I don’t have a remote router speed controller, so for me to change speeds, I need access to the router body. I hate lifting out the lift plate and router, it might be quicker on some occasions to just open the door and reach and to twist that knob.

Might behoove me to get a remote speed control? Or build a door?

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3810 posts in 4490 days


#11 posted 04-09-2021 01:24 PM

Remember, a dust collector, (not a vacuum cleaner) relies of air volume to pull dust in from afar. So air infiltration into the chamber at least as much as the collector can suck in is needed. 4” hose then 4 total inches of air in. A vacuum cleaner is a little different. It’s point of contact to get dust to go into it. A dust collector relies on drawing in lots of air. I used to have a setup sort of like this. I tried the box cleaner with a vac. It just didn’t work at all. A dust collector gets just about all of it.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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