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Forum topic by Panthera posted 03-27-2021 12:21 AM 578 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


03-27-2021 12:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: mortise tenon

my first mortise and tenon joint! What were you thinking? I drilled and chiseled the mortise, and cut the tenon with a dado setup. Ignore the groove on the side, this was just some scraps I had laying around. Would not want to do my first attempt on a real project.


17 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

11193 posts in 4732 days


#1 posted 03-27-2021 12:30 AM

Mine were terrible. The project fell apart.

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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


#2 posted 03-27-2021 12:38 AM

That is why I used scraps. Working on an entry table project,I need to practice before I commit to the real stuff! I am still learning the basics.


Mine were terrible. The project fell apart.

- Loren


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SMP

3991 posts in 990 days


#3 posted 03-27-2021 01:12 AM

My first M&T came out pretty good. But my 2nd one was way worse. I had to glue on a thin strip to the tenon and redo it. Another one I messed up afterwards because i used 2 different boards s4s, but realized AFTER that they were slightly different thicknesss

View pottz's profile

pottz

16901 posts in 2068 days


#4 posted 03-27-2021 03:03 AM

it’s all about precise measurement and marking,or you do what i did and buy a domino-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Walker

464 posts in 1556 days


#5 posted 03-27-2021 03:36 AM

I sure do, it was yesterday! I’ve done some through tenons before. Most of the time I find other ways to do the joinery. But I’m working on a small-ish project, a saddle rack for my wife. It’s low risk if I screw it up. Requires 8 M&T joints. So far I’ve done 4, and only have them dry fit. They are not pretty, but they seem to line up ok.

I think my weakness right now is my chiseling skills, and chisel sharpening skills. I used a forstner bit in the drill press with a jig to line everything up. But cleaning up and squaring the mortise with the chisel did not go so well.

The tenon part is easier. Just make it too big and then sneak up on it with tiny cuts until the fit is right.

-- ~Walker

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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


#6 posted 03-27-2021 03:41 AM

Was looking a jigs, reading a lot of reviews and comments in the forums. My impression is the jigs I can afford are not worth it, and the ones that are good I cannot afford. I like jigs, but some of them are quite pricey. I thought I would try this, and so far so good. I will try one or two more practice ones before I jump into the project joints.

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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


#7 posted 03-27-2021 04:16 AM

My wife provided a nice set of garret wade chisels for Christmas, so they are still sharp, and they worked well. I will have to watch for dulling. I used a brad point bit, 5/16” mortise. From what I have read, and watched, I worked my way close on the tenons and sanded a bit to get a nice tight fit. I have seen the shim technique before, but I winder if that significantly weakens the joint? For shear and flex, the strength is in the material that is still part of the rail. For my project dowels would be fine, but for something bigger that might be a concern, learning as I go.


I sure do, it was yesterday! I ve done some through tenons before. Most of the time I find other ways to do the joinery. But I m working on a small-ish project, a saddle rack for my wife. It s low risk if I screw it up. Requires 8 M&T joints. So far I ve done 4, and only have them dry fit. They are not pretty, but they seem to line up ok.

I think my weakness right now is my chiseling skills, and chisel sharpening skills. I used a forstner bit in the drill press with a jig to line everything up. But cleaning up and squaring the mortise with the chisel did not go so well.

The tenon part is easier. Just make it too big and then sneak up on it with tiny cuts until the fit is right.

- Walker


View corelz125's profile

corelz125

2825 posts in 2060 days


#8 posted 03-27-2021 02:17 PM

Which jig do you like the best? Can you build one?

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

3991 posts in 990 days


#9 posted 03-27-2021 02:20 PM

If you get a should plane, or a rabbet block plane, it is 10times easier to make the tenons just a tas to big and use the plane to sneak up on the fit, by the thou

View DevinT's profile

DevinT

801 posts in 51 days


#10 posted 03-27-2021 08:57 PM

I’ll let you know how my first time goes. Joinery excites me, and I am looking forward to trying my hand at Knapp Joints this year.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2131 posts in 686 days


#11 posted 03-27-2021 09:24 PM

Nothing better than seeing a good joint come together. On the other hand it can be frustrating when you miss hit it. But I always need to practice so I try to use some in my shop projects. It’s funny how I have gone from mostly plywood and screws/nails to solid wood and joinery. I find it quite enjoyable.

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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


#12 posted 04-15-2021 09:09 PM

I just finished a project with mortise and tenon joints. I discovered using a spiral router bit, router guides, and making templates to be so much better than the drill and chisel method. I still need to work a bit more on the shoulders, the next project should be better. Learning as I go, and enjoying it! I made an entry table with a shoe rack as the bottom shelf. The top is mahogany with red oak trim, the rest is red oak.

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Panthera

12 posts in 111 days


#13 posted 04-15-2021 09:14 PM

Any recommendations on brand and style?
TIA


If you get a should plane, or a rabbet block plane, it is 10times easier to make the tenons just a tas to big and use the plane to sneak up on the fit, by the thou

- SMP


View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7694 posts in 1658 days


#14 posted 04-16-2021 03:48 AM

I thought everyone started out with good fits because they went so slow, and carefully referenced back to make sure they were doing them right.

It was the second, or maybe 3rd, 4th time you cut some, that you got cocky, and Murphy kicked your butt.

-- Think safe, be safe

View metolius's profile

metolius

391 posts in 1815 days


#15 posted 04-16-2021 08:23 PM



It was the second, or maybe 3rd, 4th time you cut some, that you got cocky, and Murphy kicked your butt.

- therealSteveN

I hear that. My first mortise/tenon set were for an outfeed table – they were perfect. “That was easy” led me to some downhill from there.

-- derek / oregon

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