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Forum topic by Kelly posted 03-13-2021 01:11 AM 563 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kelly

3794 posts in 4183 days


03-13-2021 01:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cherry cherry wood burl

I should have included a ruler in the photo, but the square end piece is ABOUT the size of a 2×4’.

I have a big stack of cherry from one of the local orchards (orchardists pull a hundred acres at a whack and it all get burned in the field to make way for new trees or grapes). In the course of turning the shorts (e.g., one foot to two feet long pieces of old growth cherry trees) into squares, mini boards, bandsaw box blanks and so on, this showed up in a few of the pieces.

Note the wood off the end of the square piece is different in the two photos. These are different chunks I was cutting up.

The pattern is kind of cool and I’d like to come up with something to make out of them that would keep the pattern. I may have to resort to a bit of resin work, but I’m open to ideas or suggestions.

By the way, it took me a few days before it dawned on me what this was.


9 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4065 posts in 3036 days


#1 posted 03-13-2021 01:14 AM

Grafted tree.

-- Aj

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2147 posts in 965 days


#2 posted 03-13-2021 01:21 AM

Looks like it grew around a fence post.

View Walker's profile

Walker

465 posts in 1711 days


#3 posted 03-13-2021 01:38 AM



Looks like it grew around a fence post.

- LeeRoyMan

beat me to it. I’d say the same.

-- ~Walker

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Kelly

3794 posts in 4183 days


#4 posted 03-13-2021 02:18 AM

Having grown up in apple country, that’s where my mind went, at first. Then it dawned on me, grafts are small, this is LARGE.


Grafted tree.

- Aj2


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Kelly

3794 posts in 4183 days


#5 posted 03-13-2021 02:22 AM

THEY do, but the pattern repeats and there are not fences in orchards.


Looks like it grew around a fence post.

- LeeRoyMan


View leafherder's profile

leafherder

1986 posts in 3191 days


#6 posted 03-13-2021 03:20 AM

There might not be fences in orchards but there are braces to prop up wind damaged trees. They used an old board to stabilize a damaged tree and left it in place as the tree grew around it – like a tree growing over a fence post.

OR

Two different trees were growing side by side, so close that they could not fully remove one without damaging the other, so they cut it off and the cherry grew over the stump of the other tree.

OR

A branch was broken in a storm and they did a poor pruning job. Saw this with a walnut – a branch was sawed off leaving about six inches sticking out from the trunk, as the tree grew the stub of branch was slowly encased within the tree.

-- Leafherder

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Aj2

4065 posts in 3036 days


#7 posted 03-13-2021 03:45 AM

I still think it’s a graph. I have seen that in a American walnut and English walnut tree graph
Very cool and kinda rare.

-- Aj

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SMP

4814 posts in 1144 days


#8 posted 03-13-2021 04:16 AM

Looks like when you cut down a tree, but it doesn’t want to die and keeps growing despite you. My dad had a couple trees he would cut down in the orchard and they wouldn’t die. He even tried boring holes into the stump and putting a special poison in the holes. One tree still wouldn’t die so he hired a couple guys to dig out the roots.

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Kelly

3794 posts in 4183 days


#9 posted 03-13-2021 05:03 AM

At first, I presumed it was a graft, but grafts aren’t done square. Too, if it were a graft, the growth would be on the end opposite the square end. It isn’t.

Working in the other direction, so to speak, the square end is the end that grew. That is, a branch was cut off and a burl formed around it (Leafherder gets the stuffed animal), so the [limited] growth was on the end where the straight, square piece is.

BACKGROUND RAMBLING:

We used props [by the thousands] to hold crop laden branches up, but the props were always put up only after the crop was well advanced, then they were taken down during or after harvest.

A broken branch might be propped long enough to get the crop off, but commercial orchards have to be mowed and otherwise cared for – a prop to hold a branch up would complicate the process of grooming a hundred acre section of orchard.

The cut end (the squared end) could be from a broken branch, or it could be from a grooming process. Over time, new growing techniques are adopted. If you took a drive around my area, you’d see major changes done to fruit trees, as more is learned about getting the most yield out of an acre. Sometimes, it looks like they’ve destroyed most the tree.

All the cherry I’m cutting is from before modern (e.g/. the last thirty or so years) planting methods, which produces more fruit by planting dwarf trees, planting them closer together, and using wire systems to tie to, rather than using props to hold fruit laden branches up.

Grafting one apple variety to another variety root stock is the norm here in the Northwest. Most apple varieties could not survive the winter, so Galas, Honey Crisp, Red Delicious and so on are grafted to a hardy root stock.

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