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Grizzly G0771Z owners - do you use the blade guard?

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Forum topic by frankhagan posted 03-10-2021 10:50 PM 956 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


03-10-2021 10:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw grizzly blade guard riving knife question

I have a 1999 Jet JWTS-10JF saw that has served me well since I bought it new but now that I’m on blood thinners, I’m a bit more concerned about safety. The blade guard assembly is hard to use, and takes 20 minutes or so (plus banged up hands) to remove for sled use and reinstall. It doesn’t include a riving knife. So I don’t use it. But I want to have a blade guard I can use and a riving knife.

My options are a Shark Guard retrofit kit with two riving knives (thin and regular kerf) for about $300. Or buy a saw with a workable blade guard and riving knife. The Grizzly G0771Z would be a step up from my Jet saw. and the blade guard looks like it removes easily enough for sled use. At $1,200 delivered it’s at the top of what I would want to pay for what I do. (And before anyone asks, I have looked at the $3,000 Saw Stop and they are really very nice, worth the money if you have it, etc., but I’m not going to spend 3k on a table saw).

So, Grizzly G0771Z owners, do you use the included blade guard? Have you found it easy to remove and reinstall for using a crosscut sled, etc? (I did read the other reviews here of the saw, but haven’t seen this addressed specifically).


12 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3155 posts in 1873 days


#1 posted 03-11-2021 03:21 AM

I’ve never bothered with a blade guard. I find a ZCI a much better safety device. I’ve never had kickback issues but I have stalled a single belt saw in a wrestling match with an over stressed 2×4.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


#2 posted 03-11-2021 08:15 PM

My issue is with the blood thinners. I cut my finger with a chisel and you would have thought I cut my hand off with the amount of blood it produced. My hematologist said I could bleed quite a bit with a significant cut. I can die from minor car accidents, have internal bleeding from my bouts of diverticulitis (I get a CT scan with every episode), etc.

Many injuries are from reaching for the cutoff, or a brief distraction and you put your hand right into the spinning blade. Hasn’t happened to me in the 20 years I’ve owned this saw, but I’m smart enough to realize it could. And the stakes are higher for me now. So I’m making a different choice about safety now than I did before. No offense to anyone who doesn’t share my view on it.

I went ahead and ordered the Shark Guard and will post a review of it. I’ll re-do my cross cut sled because I think I’ll try to keep the guard on as much as possible.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5361 posts in 5246 days


#3 posted 03-11-2021 09:17 PM

I have a contractor’s saw, and use every safety feature it has. Blade guard and splitter is in use unless I use the sled.
I value my fingers, and view the TS as if it were a bucket of snakes (bad ones).

-- [email protected]

View MattB43's profile

MattB43

13 posts in 2736 days


#4 posted 03-12-2021 02:50 AM

I have a G0771, use it several times a week since I got it maybe a year ago. I have tried to use the blade guard, but I feel like it’s in the way and I can’t see what’s going on with the cut.
The riving knife always gets used though unless I’m using a dado stack. If you get the Grizzly zero clearance insert for that saw, it’s got a slot in the back so the riving knife will work with the zero clearance.

The blade guard and riving knife do come on and off pretty quickly though. There is one lever under the insert that you flip up and the riving knife comes up and out. It’s harder to get back in than it is to get out.

If you want to see close up pictures of the blade guard assembly or how it goes together or anything let me know.
FYI I think that saw does go on sale every once in awhile. I found my invoice and it shows I paid $895 in late 2019. It was $1230 with shipping, tax, the lift gate service, a mobile base, and dust collector hose.

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frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


#5 posted 03-12-2021 02:37 PM


I have a G0771, use it several times a week since I got it maybe a year ago. I have tried to use the blade guard, but I feel like it s in the way and I can t see what s going on with the cut.

Thanks for the info! I have the same problem with the stock blade guard on the saw I have. It not only obscures the cut, but also snags the work piece so it’s uncomfortable to use (It’s a 1999 saw, made before they were required to include riving knives on table saws). I actually feel less safe using it.

I have the Shark Guard on order so I’ll see how well that works.

View Jim2020's profile

Jim2020

92 posts in 524 days


#6 posted 03-12-2021 05:29 PM

Just my 2 cents. I’d like to use my blade guard so much that I made a new one for dust collection, but I have to say, even with clear polycarbonate, it’s difficult to see exactly what you’re doing. Mine collects dust good, but it’s in the way a lot of the time. The couple OEM guards I’ve had on my two table saws were worthless. Never felt safer using them than not using them. Jim

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frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


#7 posted 03-12-2021 05:46 PM


Just my 2 cents. I d like to use my blade guard so much that I made a new one for dust collection, but I have to say, even with clear polycarbonate, it s difficult to see exactly what you re doing. Mine collects dust good, but it s in the way a lot of the time. The couple OEM guards I ve had on my two table saws were worthless. Never felt safer using them than not using them.

That’s been my experience too; even if the guard is clear, dust tends to collect on the plastic and obscure what you are doing. It will take 4 to 6+ weeks for my Shark Guard to arrive with the backlog they have on the Jet kits, but I’m hoping it’s better than the stock guards.

Meanwhile, experienced guys like this having accidents because of a momentary distraction are keeping me on my toes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NjPklErvrI

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frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


#8 posted 03-12-2021 05:47 PM

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3055 posts in 886 days


#9 posted 03-12-2021 06:08 PM

Here is the crazy thing. I had a crappy Kobalt job site saw and and never once used the guard or pawls but it did have a riving knife. Something about it I just didn’t like. Out of safety concerns I moved to a Saw Stop job site saw and always use the blade guard except where the type of cut makes it not possible. I really like the above and below dust collection ports and my shop stays much cleaner now.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3155 posts in 1873 days


#10 posted 03-12-2021 06:11 PM

I was taught to keep my eyes locked on the leading edge of the cutter. Unless its a “hands free” feeder, its unsafe not to be able to clearly see the cutter.

Most blade guards, esp those with “anti kickback” pawls, are worthless.

Making a simple two piece half lapped cross requires the following cuts & blade changes:
  1. rough crosscut
  2. width rip — change to rip blade (guard removal?)
  3. thickness resaw —R&R guard
  4. final crosscuts — change to crosscut blade (guard removal?)
  5. half lap — R&R guard


Even a simple project chews up setup and teardown time.

So five operations require the guard to be removed & replaced at least twice! If time is a factor, it ain’t going to stay on for long. The two blade changes are why I use a good combo blade.

Time is $$$. Blade and guard change times are dead overhead.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View frankhagan's profile

frankhagan

9 posts in 2117 days


#11 posted 03-13-2021 04:28 AM



Time is $$$. Blade and guard change times are dead overhead.

Fair comment, and we all balance risks differently. I’m a hobbyist and don’t care about time as much as a production shop would. That being said, the OEM guard on my Jet saw takes about 20 minutes for me to remove and put back on, so I don’t put it back on (and it can’t be used for many cuts since it has a high splitter that holds the guard in place). So I do understand the hassle factor. The newer designs are reportedly much easier to remove and reinstall, plus the riving knife designs that move with the blade can stay on with sleds and other cuts. We’ll see.

If I can’t find a solution that’s safe, I’ll give up the hobby. While I’m looking forward to heaven I don’t want to go just yet.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1451 posts in 1196 days


#12 posted 03-14-2021 07:20 AM

On the Grizzly G0771Z, The riving knife has two height settings. The upper adjustment setting is about 1/2” taller than the blade. The lower adjustment setting is about the height of the blade. Or you can remove the riving knife, all by a flip of a lever.

It only takes a couple seconds to remove or attach the blade guard from the riving knife. The upper adjustment setting is for use with the blade guard. But you can make your cuts with the riving knife in the upper position without the blade guard. But not able to do rabbit or dado cuts with the riving knife in the upper adjustment setting. You then need to change the riving knife to the lower adjustment setting. By a flip of a lever, move the riving knife up or down, and flip back the lever to lock in the riving knife. Same as removal of the riving knife. Flip the lever and remove or reinstall the riving knife.

If I’m using a zero clearance throat plate, I put the riving knife in the lower adjustment setting. If I’m using a sled, I’ll have the riving knife in the lower adjustment setting.

When I’m not using the table saw, I’ll remove the blade guard and lower the blade down and out of the way. Incase I set something on the table saw. I don’t want to hit the blade.

The lever that loosens and tightens the riving knife, has a adjustment nut that regulates how much securement tension is on the riving knife. If tension is too tight, then the lever is more difficult to flip up and down. Also, if you get saw dust packed in the riving knife securement area, that could cause the lever to secure the riving knife be harder to flip. Just clean the saw dust off the riving knife attachment.

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