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Tinting minwax antique oil

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Forum topic by Twdmar posted 03-09-2021 01:59 AM 302 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Twdmar

10 posts in 779 days


03-09-2021 01:59 AM

I am ready to finish a maple baby crib. It has some quilted bits, some tiger stripe and a lot of plain grain. I want a slight amber/honey finish. I was thinking of using the minwax antique oil because it’s a finish I like and finishing goes fast. When I tested it on maple, it seemed to dry pretty much clear which is not what I want. I think I can tint it with some minwax oilbased stain but I did get a bit of blotching on plain wood. I could do a golden oak danish oil or dye/shellac/oil it too. I don’t really feel like getting out the sprayer and making a booth to spray so I would prefer a wipe on finish. Is the tinted antique oil a good idea or should I look elsewhere?


12 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6932 posts in 2443 days


#1 posted 03-09-2021 02:44 AM

You might want to look at using an amber dye or dye stain before the top coat. If you use a dye stain, you may need to use a reducer to the get a lighter shade but you can probably sand it back if the color is too intense. And if you really want to pop the grain of the figured wood, check out trace coating with a darker dye first. Charles Neal has a good video where he demonstrates the process. Whatever you do, try it on some scraps first.

My preference for wipe on finish are Tried and True Varnish oil or wipe on poly if I want a little more protection. Both take some time to build up a finish though.

Note, since this is for a crib, make sure that the stain is baby safe.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SMP

3811 posts in 961 days


#2 posted 03-09-2021 03:23 AM

Have you tried Waterlox? Its a little bit more honey, just a tad. Or just use a dye/stain first them use the antique oil. I actually really like the look of the antique oil myself. I apply it with wet/dry paper starting with 220, 320, then 400.

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Twdmar

10 posts in 779 days


#3 posted 03-09-2021 03:48 AM

I don’t plan to dye and sand back, mostly with all the little spindles I concerned about getting everything the same. Also, since the little bugger is gonna chew on it etc, repairs would be tougher. I have not tried waterlox or tried and true varnish. I have not seen them locally. I like putting the antique oil on with sandpaper with walnut and it looks great. My concern with sanding the antique oil on over dye is sanding out the dye. That was the reason for my question about tinting it. I have gotten nice color on maple with just shellac. I may try an amber shellac and put the antique oil over it for a test

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Twdmar

10 posts in 779 days


#4 posted 03-09-2021 03:51 AM

I don’t plan to dye and sand back, mostly with all the little spindles I concerned about getting everything the same. Also, since the little bugger is gonna chew on it etc, repairs would be tougher. I have not tried waterlox or tried and true varnish. I have not seen them locally. I like putting the antique oil on with sandpaper with walnut and it looks great. My concern with sanding the antique oil on over dye is sanding out the dye. That was the reason for my question about tinting it. I have gotten nice color on maple with just shellac. I may try an amber shellac and put the antique oil over it for a test. I don’t do a ton of work with maple.

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SMP

3811 posts in 961 days


#5 posted 03-09-2021 04:00 AM

Just make sure to get dewaxed amber shellac, or mix your own from dewaxed flakes if you are gonna topcoat it

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CaptainKlutz

4349 posts in 2550 days


#6 posted 03-09-2021 04:26 AM

Baby crib? Wood figure? Simple?
Dewaxed Shellac
Will bring out figure, add some color, easy to sand/repair, and kid can eat as much they want.

If you want to bring out figure, might test a coat of darker amber shellac, then use Blonde for remaing top coats.
If want more color, couple drops of brown dye in 1st coat will pop grain too.

IMHO – Would be whole lot easier to spray than wipe those spindles too?

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1345 posts in 2158 days


#7 posted 03-09-2021 04:34 AM

You might also try adding a dye to the Antique Oil. Or use one of the tinted Watco Oils. I think they are similar.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6926 posts in 3549 days


#8 posted 03-09-2021 11:26 AM

I think a better option would be to use a Watco finish already tinted, or you could just dye (no shellac needed. The use of shellac is to seal the dye from coming in contact with something that will re-dissolve it….the Antique Finish shouldn’t do that. It’s mostly a waterborne finish issue. But to me te best approach would be to go with what you have, after all it will darken over time….and probably get darker than you want (no way around that).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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OSU55

2774 posts in 3045 days


#9 posted 03-09-2021 04:46 PM

I use oil soluable dyes in poly thinned for wipe on a lot. Can be used in mw antique oil as well. Much better than tinted watco, which uses pigment and shows all your defects/scratches. I use WD Lockwood dyes from here https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/dept/CLWO. Read my blog on finishing with “oil”. If you use solvent finish make sure it passes the smell test before letting the rugrat chew on it. Once cured these finishes are just plastic that will pass right through.

View Twdmar's profile

Twdmar

10 posts in 779 days


#10 posted 03-09-2021 06:51 PM

Straight shellac doesn’t sound too bad, I always thought it was pretty fragile but apparently not so much. I will have to search out an oil based dye and try that too. The antique oil with stain mixed and the watco were blotchy. Thank you everyone for the suggestions, time to try a few of them out.

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OSU55

2774 posts in 3045 days


#11 posted 03-09-2021 08:47 PM

Well, maple is typically gonna blotch. The darker, and more intense, the color the more it shows. Some like it some not, personal preference. Here is how to control it.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6932 posts in 2443 days


#12 posted 03-09-2021 10:09 PM

Quilting and tiger ear figure are basically extreme types of blotching which is why I mentioned the trace coating. Accent the figure and it could look pretty amazing.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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