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Forum topic by KvG posted 03-08-2021 04:29 PM 442 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KvG

31 posts in 79 days


03-08-2021 04:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cabinets built-ins

I’m nearing the stage where I need to make a decision on the countertop. These are for the family room, so the top will get very little if any, use. The dimension of the top will be approximately 85 long” x 26” deep.

I’m planning on using birch plywood – but, I had originally designed it for two 3/4” pieces laminated with hardwood trim, giving it a 1 1/2-ish thickness. Now, I’m wondering if I just go with 1”, or a single 3/4” and use the trim to add the additional dimension. Maybe MDF instead?

FYI…There will be 50”+ high shelves resting on it.

All cabinet casings 3/4” birch ply, and plan to use that on the shelving units, too.

Thoughts?

-- What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive. -Arnold Palmer


7 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1363 posts in 2180 days


#1 posted 03-09-2021 03:28 PM

The 3/4” birch ply with edging to provide extra apparent thickness is the way it is usually done and should be perfectly adequate assuming you have proper support underneath.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7653 posts in 1651 days


#2 posted 03-09-2021 04:01 PM

I too would say the 1 1/2” of plywood, edged, will provide your thickness, and support. Will likely be adequate.

This program the Sagulator is a good way to figure what any load could do as far as sag estimate. Note on the slider for material used the sheet goods are on the bottom, and Fir Ply is as close as you can get to BB ply.

https://woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

It works very well if you keep one thing in mind. You could just use the actual weight of the upper cabinets, but that would be inaccurate, unless you kept those 50” + tall cabinets empty. You need to do a strong estimate of combined weight of the cabs, and the load they will hold.

Therein lies the real question of bilyo’s final words. “assuming you have proper support underneath.”

So the next question would be how much of the 85 long” x 26” deep is to have 50” + cabinets sitting on it, and how will that be spaced? Here a picture, or drawing of what you want could be helpful.

-- Think safe, be safe

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KvG

31 posts in 79 days


#3 posted 03-09-2021 04:25 PM



The 3/4” birch ply with edging to provide extra apparent thickness is the way it is usually done and should be perfectly adequate assuming you have proper support underneath.

- bilyo


Thank you.

-- What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive. -Arnold Palmer

View KvG's profile

KvG

31 posts in 79 days


#4 posted 03-09-2021 04:27 PM


I too would say the 1 1/2” of plywood, edged, will provide your thickness, and support. Will likely be adequate.

This program the Sagulator is a good way to figure what any load could do as far as sag estimate. Note on the slider for material used the sheet goods are on the bottom, and Fir Ply is as close as you can get to BB ply.

https://woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

It works very well if you keep one thing in mind. You could just use the actual weight of the upper cabinets, but that would be inaccurate, unless you kept those 50” + tall cabinets empty. You need to do a strong estimate of combined weight of the cabs, and the load they will hold.

Therein lies the real question of bilyo s final words. “assuming you have proper support underneath.”

So the next question would be how much of the 85 long” x 26” deep is to have 50” + cabinets sitting on it, and how will that be spaced? Here a picture, or drawing of what you want could be helpful.

- therealSteveN


Thank you. One side will the similar to the first pic, but will have two 17” units flanking a wider unit in the middle. The TV will be hanging on the wall, and won’t be on the cabinet.

The other side will be closer to the second pic with two 24” units flanking a 36” unit in the center.

-- What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive. -Arnold Palmer

View Robert's profile

Robert

4553 posts in 2558 days


#5 posted 03-09-2021 07:35 PM

The way a coutertop is normally made – build up the edges with strips of 3” wide ply, and do the same over the cab sides, which hopefully coincide with the vertical.

This also keeps your countertop bottom flush with the top of the cabs. Not a big deal until you find out the overhang hides the face frame and looks funny.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View KvG's profile

KvG

31 posts in 79 days


#6 posted 03-09-2021 08:16 PM


The way a coutertop is normally made – build up the edges with strips of 3” wide ply, and do the same over the cab sides, which hopefully coincide with the vertical.

This also keeps your countertop bottom flush with the top of the cabs. Not a big deal until you find out the overhang hides the face frame and looks funny.

- Robert


Thanks…I’m using a wider top face frame to hopefully avoid that. The top will overhang the cabinet front some by about 1 1/2”.

-- What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive. -Arnold Palmer

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3534 posts in 4021 days


#7 posted 03-10-2021 05:56 AM

I’m in the “stay with 3/4” and use 1-1/2” facings” camp. Either the base will support everything above, or it won’t. If it won’t, obviously, there shouldn’t be anything on top of it.

Think of kitchen cabinets. Gals stack five thousand pounds of Feista Ware on them, and they don’t fall of the wall or collapse.

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