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best way to fix chair?

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Forum topic by bordercommunity posted 03-08-2021 01:09 PM 364 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bordercommunity

3 posts in 35 days


03-08-2021 01:09 PM

Hello, wondering best way to fix this tenon that snapped off inside the stile. Do I just glue and clamp? If so, Titebond or epoxy?

I was also thinking maybe glue and then drive a couple screws from underneath the seat into the stile. Thanks for the help.


9 replies so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3809 posts in 4488 days


#1 posted 03-08-2021 01:52 PM

Hmmm. I don’t think just glue will do it. Lots of tension there. I’d put glue in for sure, or epoxy, but then I’d get a long screw, maybe a desk screw and put it in from the bottom of where your hand is into the leg at a 45% angle. Drill it first and put a countersink in so it won’t stick out. Underneath it won’t show. Be sure to use a long one and angle it so that it goes through a lot of wood and not just a little bit in the corner. You’ll be drilling upwards right through the tenon and into the leg so It’s got to be long enough to reach a ways beyond the tenon into the solid wood.

I’ve used these deck screws (home depot) on stuff like this. They hide well and they have thinner threads near the head that tend to pull things together. But, any good screw should be fine.
Good luck with it…

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17269 posts in 3669 days


#2 posted 03-08-2021 02:31 PM

Another option depends on getting the parts separated enough to drill out what I’ll call a domino (from stile and seat) and replace it entirely. That’d be optimal, but may not be practical.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1345 posts in 2153 days


#3 posted 03-08-2021 03:21 PM

I’m assuming that you can’t spread the joint apart more than what you have shown. If so, I tend to agree with Craftsman. However, you can make it a bit stronger by using similar but longer screws (and glue) putting them in horizontally through the leg into the seat member. Counter sink the screw on the back and then put in a plug or button. extra length is needed because you are putting the screws into end grain. Two screws would work best. You could then put in faux plugs or buttons on the other leg so they look like they match.

Since, as Craftsman says, there is a lot of stress on those joints and the one joint has already failed, you might consider putting similar screws in the other leg whether it looks broken or not. It may already be cracked internally and a couple of screws will, perhaps, keep it from totally failing.

View bordercommunity's profile

bordercommunity

3 posts in 35 days


#4 posted 03-08-2021 04:30 PM

Thanks guys, do you have any thoughts on Titebond vs epoxy?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3809 posts in 4488 days


#5 posted 03-08-2021 04:53 PM



Thanks guys, do you have any thoughts on Titebond vs epoxy?

- bordercommunity

Titebond is wonderful for wood but the smoother the surface the better. Some people rough wood up a bit thinking that it will make a better glue-up. But, in actuality the smoother the surface the better. That splintering wouldn’t do a good joint I don’t think. My choice would be epoxy.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6768 posts in 1640 days


#6 posted 03-08-2021 05:02 PM

Keep in mind that PVA glue doesn’t adhere to PVA glue. You’ll need to clean off the old glue first.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1345 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 03-09-2021 04:22 AM

I don’t know first hand, but I’m told that epoxy adheres well to PVA. If so, I would use epoxy. You will not be able to clean up that joint without taking it apart.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

8743 posts in 3459 days


#8 posted 03-09-2021 05:21 AM



Keep in mind that PVA glue doesn t adhere to PVA glue. You ll need to clean off the old glue first.

- Rich

Very true. Had to have a helper in the shop for 3 weeks after an accident at work. Not much experience so he was all questions. We addressed this so I had him try it. Didn’t stick for anything, broke with little effort at all.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View bordercommunity's profile

bordercommunity

3 posts in 35 days


#9 posted 03-09-2021 02:06 PM

Epoxy it is—-thanks for all the comments.

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