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Couple of table saw questions...

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Forum topic by Beuford posted 03-08-2021 12:22 PM 636 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beuford

19 posts in 44 days


03-08-2021 12:22 PM

Any help would be appreciated. Questions are in relation to an older 10” (circa 2000?) Delta table saw marked 36-670, but manual says 36-649:

1) How tight should I tighten the blade nut? My saw has a thick stamped steel flange, but it seems to distort if I tighten it until it gets difficult.

2) My blade is ~ 0.003 – 0.004 inch off of parallel to the miter slot from the front to rear of the blade. Is this “close enough” for most work?

Thanks!

Beuford


25 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#1 posted 03-08-2021 12:32 PM

You can get better “washers” for the arbor. 5/8 arbor, so all the flange washers will work. Get one from machined steel. I tighten “snug”. Right or wrong I have no idea, but works for me.

I would adjust for no more than .002 parallel to blade. You must have the arbor sorted first. Use the same tooth etc. One suggestion was cutting a sheet of 1/2 phenolic that was very flat into an oblong that hung over on the table top giving you a strait, but further distance measuring point. The straighter, the less likely kick-back, cleaner cut, lower effort etc. .003 is not bad though. Most blades have .001 or so runout, or at least the good ones. Cheap places may be a lot more. So the same tooth suggestion.

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Robert

4519 posts in 2531 days


#2 posted 03-08-2021 12:35 PM

No need to torque it down, just moderately tight. The rotation goes opposite direction if tightening.

I wouldn’t mess with adjusting .003 out, the arbor runout and/or blade wobble is probably as much or more.

You can mic the width of a kerf and figure that out.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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OldBull

347 posts in 346 days


#3 posted 03-08-2021 12:52 PM

Beuford I hope you don’t mind me asking some questions about the same thing.

How/where do you get better washers? I know the standard 5/8 but is the outside diameter the same?

How easy does the OEM inside washer come off? I am trying to replace mine, thanks.

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JIMMIEM

189 posts in 1892 days


#4 posted 03-08-2021 01:47 PM

For getting good blade alignment check out PALS (Precision Alignment System) from InLine Industries. Cost about $20 and will help align the blade. I’ve got an old Craftsman contractor saw and the PALS have made a big difference..best $20 I’ve ever spent.

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SMP

3773 posts in 956 days


#5 posted 03-08-2021 04:20 PM

On the stamped steel nuts, i usually flatten on a flat surface with wet dry paper to get all of the stamped imperfections off. Alternatively you can buy the machined upgrades and balancers.

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Beuford

19 posts in 44 days


#6 posted 03-09-2021 09:48 AM



Beuford I hope you don t mind me asking some questions about the same thing.

How/where do you get better washers? I know the standard 5/8 but is the outside diameter the same?

How easy does the OEM inside washer come off? I am trying to replace mine, thanks.

It’s really not simply a “washer”. The outer arbor flange, which I’ve described for my saw as a heavy stamped steel affair, is a precise fit and so takes a bit of wiggling to remove. The inner flange is part of the drive shaft and is not removable.

Beuford

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Beuford

19 posts in 44 days


#7 posted 03-09-2021 09:57 AM



On the stamped steel nuts, i usually flatten on a flat surface with wet dry paper to get all of the stamped imperfections off. Alternatively you can buy the machined upgrades and balancers.

- SMP

Where?!? Maybe I’m using the wrong search terms but I can’t find an aftermarket machined replacement like you describe…

Beuford

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tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#8 posted 03-09-2021 10:03 AM

Look for the part as a replacement from any “serious” saw. Jet, Griz, PM, Harvey…
My Harvey has a machined washer and nut that fit as a pair.
Trying to remember, but I think even my Ridgid contractor was machined.

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Nubsnstubs

1774 posts in 2780 days


#9 posted 03-09-2021 02:03 PM

Beuford, when tightening the nut , all you need to do is hand tighten the nut onto the arbor, then set the wrench on the nut, and let it rest on the infeed side of the throat. Grab the blade, and pull towards yourself. All you need is about 3-4 teeth movement to lock the blade onto the shaft. When you want to remove the blade, get a piece of scrap wood. Put it up against the front of the blade. Put your wrench onto the nut and pull towards yourself. If the blade starts to cut the wood, push in harder. If it still cuts, then you need to use another wrench on the backside of the inner flange.
I’ve been in the woodworking business for over 40 years, and have only had one blade over tighten itself to where I had to use a second wrench to loosen it. As far as the outside flange, just sand it on a flat surface. If the sanding marks are a line in the middle of the flange seat, sand until it is completely flat. If you aren’t happy with it, try this place, [email protected] located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ................ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

189 posts in 1892 days


#10 posted 03-09-2021 03:49 PM



Beuford, when tightening the nut , all you need to do is hand tighten the nut onto the arbor, then set the wrench on the nut, and let it rest on the infeed side of the throat. Grab the blade, and pull towards yourself. All you need is about 3-4 teeth movement to lock the blade onto the shaft. When you want to remove the blade, get a piece of scrap wood. Put it up against the front of the blade. Put your wrench onto the nut and pull towards yourself. If the blade starts to cut the wood, push in harder. If it still cuts, then you need to use another wrench on the backside of the inner flange.
I ve been in the woodworking business for over 40 years, and have only had one blade over tighten itself to where I had to use a second wrench to loosen it. As far as the outside flange, just sand it on a flat surface. If the sanding marks are a line in the middle of the flange seat, sand until it is completely flat. If you aren t happy with it, try this place, [email protected] located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ................ Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs


@Nubsnstubs
Good info. Thanks for posting. I’ve never been quite sure how much to tighten a table saw blade.

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Beuford

19 posts in 44 days


#11 posted 03-09-2021 08:50 PM



Beuford, when tightening the nut , all you need to do is hand tighten the nut onto the arbor, then set the wrench on the nut, and let it rest on the infeed side of the throat. Grab the blade, and pull towards yourself. All you need is about 3-4 teeth movement to lock the blade onto the shaft. When you want to remove the blade, get a piece of scrap wood. Put it up against the front of the blade. Put your wrench onto the nut and pull towards yourself. If the blade starts to cut the wood, push in harder. If it still cuts, then you need to use another wrench on the backside of the inner flange.
I ve been in the woodworking business for over 40 years, and have only had one blade over tighten itself to where I had to use a second wrench to loosen it. As far as the outside flange, just sand it on a flat surface. If the sanding marks are a line in the middle of the flange seat, sand until it is completely flat. If you aren t happy with it, try this place, [email protected] located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ................ Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

I’m afraid that my outside flange washer might be unsalvageable. It is severely cupped from overtightening. The outside edge is no longer flat, and so it does not line up properly with the arbor flange edge; instead it contacts the saw blade inside of the arbor flange edge. The result is that even light tightening of the flange nut causes the saw blade to cup as well. This is confirmed by the marks made on a new saw blade: The mark on the arbor side is a circle 2.5” in diameter (matching the arbor flange); the marks on the nut side are a circle of only 2” in diameter – even though the flange washer is 2.5” in diameter.

Fortunately, the arbor flange is in good shape; only the flange outer flange washer needs to be replaced/fixed.


Arbor flange


Flange washer

I’ll either need to flatten the outside edge of the flange washer or find a new one…

Beuford

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MrUnix

8502 posts in 3249 days


#12 posted 03-09-2021 09:02 PM

You might find this Matthias Wandel (woodgears.ca) article/video helpful:

Fixing the wobble in a table saw arbor

Easy fix. Straighten it out and then stop going gorilla on a nut that only needs to be slightly more than hand tight.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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splintergroup

4963 posts in 2273 days


#13 posted 03-09-2021 09:03 PM

I’d do as you are thinking, flatten the outer surface and flip it over. Even if temporary to get the saw in use again while you try and source a replacement, you’ll prevent damage to your blades.

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fivecodys

1728 posts in 2687 days


#14 posted 03-09-2021 09:50 PM



For getting good blade alignment check out PALS (Precision Alignment System) from InLine Industries. Cost about $20 and will help align the blade. I ve got an old Craftsman contractor saw and the PALS have made a big difference..best $20 I ve ever spent.

- JIMMIEM

Yep. I put them on my PM 64A. Worked great!

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

189 posts in 1892 days


#15 posted 03-09-2021 10:04 PM


For getting good blade alignment check out PALS (Precision Alignment System) from InLine Industries. Cost about $20 and will help align the blade. I ve got an old Craftsman contractor saw and the PALS have made a big difference..best $20 I ve ever spent.

- JIMMIEM

Yep. I put them on my PM 64A. Worked great!

- fivecodys


I still can’t believe I followed the instructions in the Sears manual that said to use a hammer and block of wood to get the blade aligned.

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